HSHSP Ep 101: How to Teach a World Language if You Don’t Know One

This week on HSHSP Ep 101: How to Teach a World Language if You Don’t Know One.

HSHSP Ep 101: How to Teach a World Language When You Don't Know One

HSHSP Ep 101: How to Teach a World Language if You Don’t Know One

What goes into a real homeschool high school World Language credit and how do you handle it if you don’t know one yourself?

World Language credits need 4 components:

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Speaking

In many areas, homeschool highschoolers need 2 years of the same World Language. In some areas, they need 3 years of the same language. For highly competitive colleges, they may need 4 years.

Some World Languages that our local homeschool highschoolers have studied include:

  • Spanish
  • French
  • German
  • Russian
  • Chinese
  • Korean
  • Japanese
  • Latin
  • Greek
  • Gaelic
  • American Sign Language

Check your colleges of interest to see if there is a language that they will not accept.

What are some good ways to for your homeschool highschoolers to learn World Languages?

  • Often it is good to start with a textbook to get a handle on vocabulary, grammar and basic conversations. Check out the publishers’ websites for free resources to enhance the curriculum. For students who are self-directed, they can plug through on their own. Some students will need more help, so you will need to learn along with them.
  • With immersion curriculum like Rosetta Stone, students can more often learn without much adult input. However, make sure you get the homeschool version or they won’t get the necessary grammar.
  • Online courses, like those at Currclick.com, are a great way to let someone else take charge of the language for you.
  • Co-ops and group classes are marvelous ideas because they allow for lots of interaction, conversations and fun.

Here are some valuable resources to add to curriculum (we are not affiliates with any of these):

  • Duolinguo app
  • Tiny Flashcards app
  • Memrise app
  • Babbel app
  • Freerice.com vocabulary game
  • Vocabulary games like good, old-fashioned Hangman
  • Bible verse memorization (In groups you can have games to learn the verses: Fill in the blank competitions, chanting, recitation relays)
  • Nursery rhyme memorization
  • Childrens’ songs singalongs
  • Reports on the countries (in English in years 1 and 2, in the language year 3 and 4). BEWARE: Google translate is not a good tool for writing papers in another language.

Because we are not shackled to a rule on how much curriculum to cover, in the group Language classes that Kym and Vicki have taught, we have generally covered 1/2 textbook each year and spent the rest of the necessary hours in conversation, writing, listening and interactive activities.

For homeschool highschoolers who need more than 2 years, years 3 and 4 should entail much more reading and writing.

  • start with children’s story books in the language
  • read lots of poetry in the language
  • read classic familiar books in English and the chosen language (like The Little Prince or The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe)

Checkout some other fun resources at Vicki’s World Languages Pinterest board.

Remember: Learning happens better if you’re having fun. There’s not one right way but there are many fun ways.

Join Kym and Vicki for a resource-filled discussion on covering a World Language when you don’t know one. In the meantime, enjoy these posts.

How to Homeschool World Languages in High School

HSHSP Ep 21: World Language Credit How-to’s

HSHSP Ep 101: How to Teach a World Language if You Don’t Know One


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HSHSP Ep 100: What are Some Homeschool Graduates Doing?

This week on HSHSP Ep 100: What are Some Homeschool Graduates Doing?

HSHSP Ep 100 What Homeschool Graduates Are Doing Now

 

HSHSP Ep 100: What are Some Homeschool Graduates Doing?

CONGRATULATIONS to us! This is Episode 100!! Thanks for joining us!

To celebrate our 100th episode, we’ve asked homeschool graduates from all around to send us a voice memo telling us their name, year of graduation, and something they are doing now. We are SO very blessed to hear about the many things they are doing for career and interests.

One thing we are excited about is that a number of the contributors were from Mt. Sophia Academy, our local homeschool umbrella school.

Remember, success has little to do with high paying jobs (although there are homeschool graduates that have that).

Success for our homeschool graduates has to do with fulfilling God’s plans for them.

Learning to fulfill their vocations and their avocations, their careers and their services and community involvements: THAT’S what is important!

Join us- Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Quella (the Seeing Eye puppy) as we share this heartwarming montage of the many homeschool graduates’s “what they are doing”. Listen in and find out what success looks like for them at this point in life!

In the meantime, enjoy these links to some of the activities homeschool graduates are doing.

Top 40 Philosophy Podcast

Joanna Tillman Photography

HSHSP Ep 100: What are Some Homeschool Graduates Doing?

HSHSP Ep 99: Being Real and Flexible When Your Teens Become Adults

This week on HSHSP Ep 99: Being Real and Flexible When Your Teens Become Adults.

HSHSP Ep 99: Being Real and Flexible When Your Teens Become Adults

HSHSP Ep 99: Being Real and Flexible When Your Teens Become Adults

What is a realistic look at life after homeschool graduation?

Life for this generation’s graduates looks different when we compare to our lives when we moms graduated!

  • Jobs are different
  • Life expenses are different
  • Expectations are different

Here is an important tip for you and your homeschool graduates to remember: Flexibility!

Also remember: We are NOT in charge of the outcomes. God is in charge of the outcomes. As parents, we must often *let go and let God*.

Sabrina, Vicki and Kym discuss some of the reality of life after graduation:

Sometimes, adult children need to live at home for a while because student loans and other expenses prevent them from living on their own. (As one of our homeschool graduates reminded us, this was common several generations ago.)

  • When our graduates stay at home for a while, how do they move into roommate status (instead of us parents continuing to “baby” them)?

Sometimes, our adult children need to live with multiple roommates to make ends meet. How do they adjust to that lifestyle?

Remember: Jesus said, “In this world you will have tribulation.” Hard times do not equal failure!

Beware of the idea that our homeschool graduates should continue to be “happy, shiny homeschoolers”.

Remember: Life is NOT ever going to be perfect!

Remember: While we are not in charge of the outcome, we are in charge of prayer. Prayer is always necessary no matter HOW old our homeschool graduates are. AND you are where you are because that’s where you are…let God handle it.

These are a few of the thoughts that we share this episode. Listen in! And in the meantime, check out the good advice in these posts:

Omega Moms: Life After Last Kid Graduates

What Retired Homeschool Moms Tell Me

HSHSP Ep 70: What Happens When the Last Kid Graduates?

 

HSHSP Ep 99: Being Real and Flexible When Your Teens Become Adults

HSHSP Ep 98: Assigning Grades for Homeschool Highschool Transcripts

This week on HSHSP Ep 98: Assigning Grades for Homeschool Highschool Transcripts.

HSHSP Ep 98: Assigning Grades for Homeschool Highschool Transcripts

HSHSP Ep 98: Assigning Grades for Homeschool Highschool Transcripts

Many of us homeschooling moms never assigned grades in elementary or middle school. We wanted our kids to learn to love education and not be pressured by grades.

But in homeschool highschool, we need to

  • Training perfectionistic teens on what a stopping point is. What is GOOD ENOUGH.
  • Training kids who don’t care at all about grades to discipline themselves. What is GOOD ENOUGH for them?
  • Training moms who are too soft or too hard on their teens how to stick to guidelines.

Self-discipline is the key for successful grading. AND self-discipline is a necessary life skill.

How can we homeschool moms manage grading homeschool highschoolers?

Follow Sabrina’s Guideline: Good grading comes from goals.

Set goals for each course. Make a formula that takes in the goals for each course for each student, including:

  • Effort
  • Mastery
  • Cooperation with peers (in a group class or co-op class)

Create a rubric for grading. Explain the rubric to the homeschool highschoolers so that they know what is expected and what will be graded.

  • Use rubrics, especially in courses that include writing, projects or labs. (Also, avail your teen of the peer review process if you have a co-op class.)
  • In concrete courses like math, you simply need to explain the grading process.
    • % of grade that comes from tests
    • % of grade that comes from daily assignments
    • % of grade that comes from attitude
    • Explain to teens that they will experience *subjective points* occasionally in co-op classes and in college
  • Homeschool moms have the right to adapt rubrics in textbooks for their goals.

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for an informative chat about grading homeschool highschoolers. In the meantime, have a look at these helpful posts:

 

3 Ways to Assign Grades in Homeschool High School

2 Practical Ways to Figure GPA on the Homeschool Transcript

Writing Papers for History or Science? Here’s a Simple Rubric for Grading

What’s a Rubric and Why Homeschool Moms Should Use One

HSHSP Ep 98: Assigning Grades for Homeschool Highschool Transcripts

HSHSP Ep 97: Having Hard Conversations with Your Homeschool Teen

This week on HSHSP Ep 97: Having Hard Conversations with Your Homeschool Teen.

HSHSP Ep 97: Having Hard Conversations with Your Homeschool Teen

HSHSP Ep 97: Having Hard Conversations with Your Homeschool Teen

Teens these days hear about things that many of us moms never even knew existed when we were teens. There are so many tough topics out there.

It’s hard having hard conversations with you homeschool teen.

It’s even hard talking about having hard conversations with teens.

Have your teens needed to discuss difficult things like:

  • Divorce
  • Abuse
  • Drug and alcohol abuse
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts or self-harm behaviors
  • Existential crises (*What’s life about, anyway?*)
  • Gender identity issues
  • Toxic relationships
  • Bullying
  • Body image
  • Self-esteem
  • Eating disorders
  • Sex trafficking

When teens know someone who is experience one of these topics OR if teens themselves are experiencing something like these topics, they need to talk about it with a safe and loving parent.

  • Remind teens this is a broken world full of broken people and things
  • Relationship between parent and teen is most important
  • Listen until they are through talking first without fixing or correcting
  • Never freak out (recognize and manage your own response and fear)
    • Monitor your own feelings
    • Give them focused attention and eye contact
    • Unconditionally accept your teen
  • Try different locations for talks one-on-one (driving in a car, going out to lunch)
  • Be willing to provide support (counseling, for instance)
  • Help them help their friend, if necessary, but let them know it is not their job to keep their friends safe. If a friend is in danger, you upline (tell parents, etc). Safety is more important than confidentiality.

Even families where none of those topics come up, teens run into tough topics:

  • at youth group
  • on a random website
  • on social media
  • on the televisions at the local department store

Somethings to say:

  • That’s really hard.
  • I really get it.
  • I’m sorry you’ll get though this.
  • You will get through this.
  • What are you going to do? Why will you choose that?
  • How is that working?

Remember: First, last and always…PRAY!

Remember: The strength of a family is in their unconditional love.

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for a tough discussion on tough discussions. In the meantime, enjoy these posts:

How to Help Homeschool Teens in Identity Crisis

Homeschooling Teens with Mental Illness

HSHSP Ep 58: Helping Teens in Crisis Times

Maybe the Number One Tip for Relationship Success: Be Nice!

 

HSHSP Ep 97: Having Hard Conversations with Your Homeschool Teen

HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers

This week on HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers.

HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers

HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers

Some homeschool high schoolers graduate and go to college.

Some homeschool highschoolers graduate and go right into the workforce. It’s NOT WRONG to not go to college! Not all young people are called to go to college.

Some teens need a gap year (or two) before they go to college. They want to work or serve for a time before heading to college.

There are lots of options for homeschool graduates. But FIRST they need to finish senior year. Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers:

July: Plan out the year. What is left of the academic requirements for graduation in your state and/or supervising organization. Think about practical courses like Career Exploration, Financial Literacy and think about Professional Writing. Make sure you include your teen in the process. Order curriculum.

August: Have your teen write an experiential resume. Help them search for an apprenticeship or job. Help them practice interview skills.

September: Teach your career-bound teen networking skills. Teach them how to ask for a reference. See if you can find some training classes for trades at your local community college or unions.

Winter: Work on graduation plans like senior pictures, graduation date and location, announcements while things are more quiet. Schedule backwards through the end of the school year. What academics need to be completed or caught up? Schedule backwards to the end of the year.

Also, throughout the year, you may need to wrestle with these questions:

How do you deal with students who are struggling or have some unrealistic dreams?

  • Help them discover Plan B’s and let them know how long you’ll support them as they try for professional gaming, sports or some other *big dream* career.

Join us this week for encouragement for career-bound seniors and their moms. In the meantime enjoy these posts:

What are “Values” and Why are Values Important in Career Exploration?

Homeschool Graduate and Entrepreneur Talks about Success and Financial Literacy

HSHSP Ep 82: Writing Happens, Make it Useful- Professional Writing Skills

HSHSP Ep 96: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers

HSHSP Ep 95: Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschool Highschoolers

This week on HSHSP Ep 95: Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschool Highschoolers.

HSHSP Ep 95: Senior Year for College Bound Homeschool Highschoolers

HSHSP Ep 95: Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschool Highschoolers

Senior year is different from the earlier years of homeschooling high school. We are getting LOTS of questions about what to expect from senior year for college bound homeschool highschoolers.

What needs to happen and when?

July-June: PRAY! Pray together, pray on your own!

July: Plan the academics for the year, include your teen in the process. Order your curriculum if possible.

August: Have your senior write their college admissions essays. Most of the online applications have the essay topics posted by August.

September: Narrow the college choices down to 3-5. Make sure your teen has visited those schools. If the school gets rolling admissions, your teen can start the application process.

October: If early admissions is open for your teens choice schools, you can apply now. Have them take their time and do a good job.  Get the reference requests done.

November: Wrap up the applications and recommendation letters.

Holidays: Have a nice holiday season. Keep those academics on target.

January: Keep an eye on status on the online essays….IF you are not obsessing. You really can trust God to open and close the right doors. Please don’t share everything with all your social media. Ask you teens first! Remind your teen to be compassionate with their friends who are in different places in the process.

February: Send mid-year grades to colleges. Start working on graduation. Are senior pictures done? Pick graduation date. Start organizing your ideas for graduation party and ceremony.

March: Financial aid packages have arrived. Time for your teen to make that college decision.

April: Plan the schedules to finish off academics and activities to finish in time.

May: Wrap things up.

June: Graduation!!!

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for an encouraging, empowering talk about senior year for college bound homeschool highschoolers. In the meantime, enjoy these posts and resources:

Scheduling Backwards FREEBIE from 7SistersHomeschool.com

Graduation Party Part One: How to Plan Ahead

 

 

How to Request a College Recommendation Letter

 

 

3 Top Priorities for Success in College

 

Guide to College Application Essay Writing 7SistersHomeschool.com

Click here for more information on the College Application Essay Writing Guide.

 

HSHSP Ep 95: Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschool Highschoolers

HSHSP Ep 94: Choosing College Degrees Interview with Dr. Renae Duncan

This week on HSHSP Ep 94: Choosing College Degrees Interview with Dr. Renae Duncan.

HSHSP Ep 94: Choosing College Degrees Interview with Dr. Renae Duncan

HSHSP Ep 94: Choosing College Degrees Interview with Dr. Renae Duncan

How do you help your teen know what kind of college degree they need in order to achieve their goals? That’s an important question!

Join us for an interview with Dr. Renae Duncan, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education at Murray State University. Dr. Duncan has been helping young people along their college journey for many years and can give us some useful tips in understanding the many college degrees that are available.

Dr. Renae Duncan Associate Provost of Undergraduate Affairs Murray State University

Click image for more information about Dr. Duncan and MSU.

Vicki and Renae discuss topic such as:

What’s the difference between?

  • Associates of Arts (differ from 4 year degrees in the numbers of maths and sciences)
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree (often more foreign languages and general education in the degree than BS)
  • Bachelor of Science

Other specialized degrees will vary from college to college, such as:

  • Bachelor of Social Work
  • Bachelor in Nursing
  • Bachelor in Music
  • Bachelor in Fine Arts

What is a Liberal Arts degree? Why can that be better than a straight STEM degree, even if you’re a science major?

  • Why are degrees that promote thinking skills and soft skills valuable in today’s workforce?
  • Remember the college major provides skills for a career specialty but the General Education requirements provides the employability skills.

Here are tips for choosing which degree is best for your homeschool high schooler:

  • Do Career Exploration. No way around it! A comprehensive Career Exploration course will help a teen clarify values, needs, giftings, interests and callings. These are determining factors in choosing which major AND which degree is a best fit.
  • Take college tours: Ask questions like: Why is your BA program better than others? What makes your program BA or BS? There is no substitution for walking onto a campus and talking to the staff there- person to person.
  • Talk to some students or graduates from each college you visit. Ask their opinions on the degree offered.

To sum it all up: What is the best major? The one that fits your goals for life!

Join Dr. Renae Duncan, Associate Provost of Murray State University and Vicki for this enlightening conversation. In the meantime, enjoy these posts.

Why Waste High School Credits on Career Exploration?

 

Homeschool-Friendly College: Murray State University

How to Help Teens Choose a College Major

HSHSP Ep 94: Choosing College Degrees Interview with Dr. Renae Duncan

 

HSHSP Ep 93: How to Start a Homeschool Organization Interview with Carol Topp CPA

This week on HSHSP Ep 93: How to Start a Homeschool Organization, Interview with Carol Topp CPA.

HSHSP Ep 93: How to Start a Homeschool Organization Interview with Carol Topp CPA

 

HSHSP Ep 93: How to Start a Homeschool Organization,  Interview with Carol Topp CPA

Homeschool parents are movers and shakers! If they need something, or their kids need something, and it is not available, they make it happen! Homeschoolers often start organizations: co-ops, support groups and more.

BUT here’s her rub: When we take money for services, we’ve started a business, whether we like it or not.

How do we know when we have a business or a non-profit? We go to the experts! Our favorite expert is Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA.

Carol joins Vicki for tips about starting organizations in a wise and responsible manner. She helps us understand important concepts such as:

  • What is an organization
  • Understanding its operation
  • Creating non-profit status, if you need it
  • Creating a for-profit status, if you need it
  • Forming a board
  • Creating bylaws
  • Communicating with the IRS

Carol gives us her Checklist for Starting a Non-profit Homeschool Organization:

  • Gather a board
  • Appoint officers
  • Create a binder to keep track of records
  • Create bylaws
  • Choose a structure (unincorporated or incorporated)
  • Obtain your EIN from IRS
  • Open a checking account
  • Get tax exempt status from IRS
  • Communicate with the state
  • Send in annual forms to IRS

Feel intimidated? You should probably get in touch with Carol. SHE’S intimidating. (She has great resources, too!) 

In the meantime, catch her podcast here on the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network.

HSHSP Ep 93: How to Start a Homeschool Organization,  Interview with Carol Topp CPA

 

 

HSHSP Ep 92: Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

This week on HSHSP Ep 92: Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis.

HSHSP Ep 92 Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

HSHSP Ep 92: Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

Many teens haven’t reached the developmental stage where they can think symbolically. Those non-symbolic teens are called “literal thinkers”.

There’s nothing wrong with being a literal thinker…except that it can be a BIG challenge where it comes to literature analysis. Literature analysis tends to lean heavily on inferential thinking (reading between the lines) and symbolically (metaphors, similes, analogies). This is difficult for literal thinkers.

Most teens will hit the developmental stage where they are thinking symbolically and inferentially. (In Human Development classes we call these types of thinking part of a process called *metacognition*.)

When they reach this developmental stage, they will also be able to see differing perspectives on a character or plot. But until then, Sabrina, Vicki and Kym share some thoughts about helping teens think in more mature levels.

In HSHSP Ep 92, we discuss:

  • The benefits of study guides in helping ease literal thinkers into symbolic and inferential thinking
  • Ways to use quality movies as literature for analysis
  • The benefits of discussion of analysis with family and/or peers
  • Cinema Studies post with literary devices

Got a teen who thinks concretely? Literature Analysis can be a challenge. Join us for some tips to help. In the meantime, here are some links with more good information.

How about a freebie to find out how helpful study guides can be:

Anne of Green Gables Study Guide FREE!

Here are some other helpful posts:

Literature Analysis, Literal Thinkers and Movies in High School

Cinema Studies for Literature Learning in your High School Homeschool Co-op

10 Great Discussion Questions for Homeschool Literature Co-op

HSHSP Ep 92: Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

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