The Benefits of Read Alouds in Your Homeschool

I wasn’t homeschooled, but I can remember loving library time in elementary school. It wasn’t just the books or the break away from the regular classroom. It was sitting on the big round rug listening to the librarian read aloud.

Benefits of read alouds in your homeschool

The Benefits of Read Alouds in Your Homeschool

There are studies that demonstrate that read alouds can improve pronunciation, reading speed, and a student’s ability to make connections while reading. Further, “Reading aloud to young children, particularly in an engaging manner, promotes emerging literacy and language development and supports the relationship between child and parent.”1

Beyond studies, as homeschooling parents, we understand that adding read alouds to our homeschool can foster much more than an improvement in reading and a love for it, it can foster relationship. Relationship is fundamental to a successful homeschooling experience for our families.

[easy-tweet tweet=”Relationship is fundamental to successful homeschooling. @HSRadioNetwork ” user=”@keeperGina ” hashtags=”#homeschool #readaloud “]

Through relationship we reach the souls of our children and through this relationship God shows us Himself.

How to Read Aloud

This might seem obvious. You choose a book and you begin reading aloud. Couldn’t be simpler, right? There are some tips and techniques that can make your read aloud time a better experience for everyone.

  1. Practice reading aloud. Vary your cadence. Use fun voices for certain characters if that seems fun to you!
  2. Pick a book YOU love when you first begin. If your favorite book is a longer one, try reading just a few chapters at a time, finding a stopping point that leaves them wanting more. This also teaches your child the art of savoring a book for themselves in their own reading.
  3. Keep a list of lists. Books lists will help you know the classics, the tried-and-true, the most-loved books. Suggestions: Caldecott winners, homeschooling read aloud lists, the 1,000 Good Books List, and the Vintage Homeschool Mom reading list podcast. 
  4. Take turns! You don’t have to be the only reader! Even the littlest of your children can take a turn in the read aloud seat!
  5. Make use of audio books and let the narrator take the role of teacher. This works wonderfully during long drives and the dinner making routine. You can find a wide selection at your library or even Audible.com. Our all-time favorite family read aloud was Where The Red Fern Grows. Other favorites include: The Courage of Sarah Noble, Heidi, and David Copperfield.

What if I don’t Like Reading Aloud?

If you don’t like reading aloud, it’s likely due to one of the following:

  • it’s a new concept to you and the learning curve seems too great
  • you’ve never developed a love of reading
  • you’re scared of failing
  • you’re tired after a day of homeschooling and homemaking or working and you don’t need to add one more thing to your list

I understand! You don’t have to be perfect at reading aloud, you just have to begin! It’ll be an adventure! Make use of some of the techniques above and master the new skill or allow others (your own children and audio books) to help you!

Happy reading!

1 Archives of Disease in Childhood.

 

Read alouds by Media Angels: (available on Kindle)

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