Search Results for: HSHSP Ep 51

HSHSP Ep 51: Career Exploration for Teens who Don’t Have a Clue

HSHSP Ep 51: Career Exploration with Teens Who Don't Have a ClueHSHSP Ep 51: Career Exploration for Teens who Don’t Have a Clue

“SO, what are you going to do after graduation?”

That’s the dreaded question for many teens. They simply don’t have a clue what they want to do.

How do you help a teen find direction in life? How do you help them get to know themselves or get to know God’s leading?

Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for decades have been mentoring, coaching and teaching homeschool highschoolers about Career Exploration. Join them for an expert discussion on helping teens who don’t have a clue.

Resources:

Case Study: Teen Doesn’t Have a Clue

HSHSP Ep 23: Career Exploration for Homeschool Highschoolers

My Next Move Career Interest Survey

Career One Stop (US Dept of Labor)

 

 

HSHSP Ep 51: Career Exploration With Teens Who Don’t Have a Clue

How to help teens who don’t have a clue think about and prepare for the future.

HSHSP EP 151: Approaches to Teaching Literature in Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP EP 151: Approaches to Teaching Literature in Homeschool High School.

Different Approaches to Teaching Literature. There's not ONE right way to homeschool high school Literature. Here are some approaches.

HSHSP EP 151: Approaches to Teaching Literature in Homeschool High School

Is there ONE right way to homeschool high school Literature? Of course not! Sabrina and Vicki want to encourage you to have fun with right way for your homeschool high schoolers!

If your teens LOVE reading, you’ll approach Literature with them in a different way from for your teens that HATE reading. Each homeschool high schooler has their own abilities and interests. Not only that, moms have their own interests and abilities (some of us LOVE reading, some don’t like to read anything more than Facebook)!

Here are some approaches to teaching Literature. Hopefully one of the approaches will help you out.

Traditional textbooks.

Covers themes and analysis skills with snippets of novels, short stories and poetry. It is a skills approach, not a literature appreciation or in-depth approach. Textbooks are sometimes a good fit for more literal learners because the reading selections are more short and the instructions are more concrete. However, teens who like to delve into a book will hate this approach (because it tends to kill the book). Teens who don’t like tons of reading comprehension questions or being told the *right way* to interpret a book, this is not a best-fit approach.

Whole books approach for linear thinkers.

This approach is good for literal thinkers or struggling learners. Will BORE a deep-thinking teen. Here’s an HSHSP episode on teaching literature to literal thinkers.

Comprehensive whole-books approach.

This is an in-depth, in-depth comprehension and inferential thinking literature study guide approach. You’ll find these great for teens who like to tear a book to pieces (perhaps future English teachers). However, these HUGE literature guides kill the book for many teens.

The right literature studies for your teens can help them learn to be thinkers, not parrots. Don't turn your homeschool high schoolers off with overkill studies. Here's how to find the right fit.

7Sisters approach.

Our teens tell us that they don’t like to kill the book. They want one or two themes covered per book and mostly inferential questions. The literature study guide should be no-overkill, no-busywork. The guide should also provide suggestions for *leveling-up* if they want more rigor for their homeschool transcript or personal growth. We are hoping to develop our teens’ thinking skills with these guides because we want our teens to become thinkers, not parrots!

And remember: you want your teens, where it comes to literature, to inspired, not tired!

Want more information on choosing the right approach to teaching literature in your homeschool? Check out this post.

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HSHSP EP 151: Approaches to Teaching Literature in Homeschool High School

HSHSP EP 151: Approaches to Teaching Literature in Homeschool High School

There’s more than one approach to teaching literature for high school Language Arts.

HSHSP Ep 186: Careers that Don’t Require College, Interview with Susan Stewart

This week on HSHSP Ep 186: Careers that Don’t Require College, Interview with Susan Stewart.

HSHSP Ep 186: Careers that Don't Require College, Interview with Susan Stewart. Some teens are not college-bound. Help them make the most of career exploration with this discussion of careers that don't require college. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #CareerExploration #CareersThatDontRequireCollege #NonCollegeBoundTeens #SusanStewart

HSHSP Ep 186: Careers that Don’t Require College, Interview with Susan Stewart

God creates all kinds of children. All kinds of children develop all kinds of interests and giftings. We need to make sure that teens are not pressured into going to college if their callings include careers that do not need a college degree. Why waste talent, time and money on that?

One our of favorite topics at 7SistersHomeschool.com is Career Exploration (in fact, our Career Exploration Bundle is one of our top sellers), so Vicki was really excited to be joined for this HSHSP episode by Susan Stewart of Practical Inspirations. Susan serves the homeschool community as advisor and blogger (and now has a book: Harried Homeschoolers). She has three homeschool graduates who are all doing well careers and life. None of them have college degrees.

Here are thoughts from our discussion on careers that don’t require college.

Susan starts off with a little encouragement for homeschool moms:

  • Things aren’t perfect
  • Things fall apart sometimes
  • You are not a failure because of that
  • We are not God, he has simply given you the job of raising his kids
  • God has made you enough for what he has given you

Susan and her husband did not have the homeschool goal of raising kids who go to college. Their goal was training Godly adults. So they concentrated on life skills and teaching to their homeschoolers’ needs and interests.

Susan reminds us: Not all teens are called to go to college!

Redefine success. We can fall into the trap that in order to be successful, our teens must earn a four-year degree. That is not true. Success is growing and fulfilling God’s plans!

Susan reminds us that her three kids learned that their career callings did not need college degrees. Her husband is an electrician and so her kids knew by watching their dad that career satisfaction comes from a satisfactory career, not necessarily a college degree!

  • Her kids were tired of education so graduated and just “got a job”. Her daughter got a job with a tech company and is now in management, climbing the ladder.
  • One son had some learning difficulties. He tried photography but decided he loved repairing mechanical instruments. His trouble shooting skills have made him valuable to his company.
  • One son started out in the Marines. After his stint, he made the most of his love of travel by becoming an over-the-road truck driver. He loves earning a living by doing the thing he loves: seeing America.

Susan says: We homeschoolers need to remember not be snobs about jobs. If a job is honorable and fits a person’s needs, it is a good job.

We homeschoolers need to remember not be snobs about jobs. If a job is honorable and fits a person's needs, it is a good job.

Because her older homeschool high schoolers were not interested in college, Susan invested in her children with some life preparation skills and experiences which included:

  • Part-time jobs (watering plants at a local plan nursery). Began resume building
  • Service opportunities (they did Meals on Wheels, library volunteer)
  • Job application skills (resume, interview skills, filling out application- especially answering short essay questions)
  • Financial Literacy
  • Community involvement (they did theater and other community activities)

Susan’s homeschool graduates have found that these extracurricular activities on the high school transcript can be as important (or even more important) in early employment opportunities.

Sometimes there is some discussion on whether homeschooling families should bother with an official transcript and diploma. Susan felt like it was a good investment for her teens. Vicki pointed out that sometimes employers want to see the transcript and/or diploma. This is also true sometimes when getting a passport or college applications,  if they decide to go to college later.

What are some careers that don’t require college?

Careers that don’t require college: Trades

  • Training can include:
    • Union courses
    • Apprenticeships
    • Classes at local community college
  • Carpenter
  • Welders
  • Surveyors
  • HVAC
  • Mail carriers
  • Railroad workers
  • Masons
  • Heavy equipment operators
  • Truck drivers
  • Painters
  • Steel workers
  • Construction contractors
  • Line workers
  • Electricians

Careers that don’t require college: Service

  • Training can include
    • Apprenticeships
    • Special courses
    • Classes at local community college
  • Cosmetologists
  • Barbers
  • Dog groomers and trainers

Careers that don’t require college: Technology

This field is growing so quickly, there is no way to keep up with the job descriptions. Here’s a try:

  • Training can include
    • Apprenticeships
    • Special courses
    • Classes at local community college
  • Computer-user support
  • Junior data analyst
  • Digital marketer
  • Podcast and digital media editor
  • Web developer

Careers that don’t require college: Arts

  • Training can include
    • Apprenticeships
    • Classes at local community college
  • Photography
  • Local dance teachers

Careers that don’t require college: Retail, Food Service and Banking

  • Training can include:
    • Learning hands-on
    • Avail themselves of free training within the corporation
    • Taking courses on MOOCs such as EdX

Careers that don’t require college: Fitness and Personal Training

  • Training can include:
    • Training schools
    • Apprenticeships

Careers that don’t require college: Real Estate

  • Training can include:
    • Courses from various agencies

Careers that don’t require college: Law Enforcement

  • Training includes:
    • Specialized academies

Careers that don’t require college: Military

  • Here are Susan’s suggestions for the military:
    • Develop a military-attractive transcript like she did for her son who started out in the Marines:
    • Civil Air Patrol in high school.
    • Talk to recruiter. Take the ASVAB military career test (not a test that can be failed, simply identifies best-fits for military careers).
    • Susan suggests for teens who don’t have a clue what they want to do be sure to do after graduation take a GAP year:

Careers that don’t require college: Gap Year

Some teens need a year to transition from homeschooling high school before they settle into seriously thinking about a career. Here are some of Susan’s suggestions for a gap year:

  • Get an entry-level job
  • Travel
  • Do short-term missions
  • Volunteer in a local ministry or organization

Want some more ideas about homeschooling high schoolers who are not called to go to college? Check out these HSHSP episodes:

Join Vicki and Susan for this encouraging episode and check out Susan’s resources.

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  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
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  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
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HSHSP Ep 184: Best Educational Apps and Audits for Homeschool Families, Interview with Leah Nieman

This week on HSHSP Ep 184: Best Educational Apps and Audits for Homeschool Families, Interview with Leah Nieman.

HSHSP Ep 184: Best Educational Apps and Audits for Homeschool Families, Interview with Leah Nieman. Good apps and how to for social media audits. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #LeahNieman #EducationalApps #SocialMediaAudits #HomeschoolTechnology

HSHSP Ep 184: Best Educational Apps and Audits for Homeschool Families, Interview with Leah Nieman

We hear so much bad news about the digital world and various apps. Not all apps are bad! In fact, there are some excellent choices for educational apps that can really be of help to homeschool high schoolers! You will find out about it in this episode where Vicki is joined again today by Leah Nieman of LeahNieman.com. She joins us for two topics today:

  • Best Educational Apps for Teens
  • Social Media Audits for Teens

The first topic we are discussing today is based on Leah’s blog series: Best Educational Apps for Homeschool Families.

Not all apps are bad for teens! In fact, Leah has found some apps that will be marvelous additions to the educational process.

Leah says that the more homeschoolers are on productive education apps, the less they will try to occupy their minds on mindless apps. Parents can feel good about apps that answer these questions:

  • Is it quality content
  • Does it help my child be productive
  • Does it help them develop skills

Leah suggests a number of great apps in her Best apps series, including these apps for homeschool high schoolers.

  • Google Drive: This storage and collaborative project app. Teens can also store photos and files there that they will need later or use it for group projects. Teens will be using Google Drive in college or some job situations.
  • Study Blue: This is a flashcard and quiz app. Teens can find quizzes already made or create their own flashcards. Teens learn a lot by simply creating their own study tools on this app. It is a great time-filler when driving home, waiting for a doctor’s appointment. This is a great way to study for ACT or SAT vocabulary and math skills.
  • Periodic Table apps
  • Graphing Calculator apps: Saves a LOT of money
  • Easy Bib: Formats bibliographies as your teens write their research papers. Properly formats citations for their teens. This is a great resource! This is a highly recommended app by college students.
  • Onenote and Evernote: These are apps that help teens store and organize notes and resources: These keep information and resources organized (and not lost) and can be shared when working on a team.

Not all apps are bad. Good educational apps can help teens prepare for college and career.

Leah also does social media audits

When doing a social media audit, Leah goes through all social media accounts to check the social media footprint to make sure these *speak what you want*. This is a useful process for teens who are applying to a competitive college or a private college who is serious about the kinds of students they admit. Some employers check social media accounts, also.

When conducting a social media audit, Leah:

  • Sends a questionnaire to define goals and dreams
  • Holds a kickoff session to discuss social media audit and strategies
  • Finds unused accounts and close them down.
  • Searches through social media accounts to clean up anything questionable
  • Teaches teens what they should be posting if they are *branding* themselves for college or career:
    • Values
    • Causes and ideas they are passionate about (this is important for teens going to college into majors where this will be a plus)
    • Skills
    • Accomplishments (This is not bragging. Begin to think of your social media as a branding tool and extra resume.)
  • Provides a report.
  • Sends a video with how-to’s and valuable information
  • Gives a 45 minute strategy session on building a social media strategy for building attractiveness to colleges and employers.
  • Sends ollow-up email with strategy notes and videos
  • Later on, follows up to see if there are stuck points or questions

As parents we sometimes we are so concerned about our teens’ social media, but we might need social media audits, too. Parents may have done too much *sharenting* by posting embarrassing information about our kids over the years. Leah ferrets this out and helps parents get rid of it. Vicki points out that many of us digital immigrants do not have the time or skills to be able to do our own social media audits!

Are you starting to believe you need to really increase your knowledge of the digital world with your teens? Check out this interview with Leah on the good and bad of the digital world.

You will also LOVE all the episodes at Homeschooling with Technology, with our friend Meryl van der Merve. (Start with this interview on Homeschool High School Podcast on technology skills all homeschool high schoolers need.)

HSHSP Ep 184: Best Educational Apps and Audits for Homeschool Families, Interview with Leah Nieman

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

This week on HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck.

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck. Informative Career Exploration interview with ideas for homeschool moms to help teens make realistic choices. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolCareerExploration #CareerCoachingIdeasForTeens #HomeschoolHighSchool

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

As many homeschool families know by now, 7Sister Vicki LOVES career exploration. She is joined today by Jamie Beck a homeschooling mom and career coach in California.

Jamie homeschools her 12 year old through a charter school in California. She also has an elementary-aged son in traditional school, which shows that there’s not ONE right way to homeschool…even if it is in a traditional school setting 😉

Jamie decided to homeschool and started teaching Career Education when her daughter was 2 and a half year old. She started by creating a children’s book, which did not do financially well. She felt it was a failure but she used the failure, not as defeat, but to give herself impetus to develop a Career Exploration program for young people. (See links at the end of the post.)

Jamie’s top piece of advice is to tweak how you teach your kids to talk about careers. Teach them to say:

  • “When I grow up I want to work with…” rather than “When I grow up I want to be a… ”
    • Children are conditioned by society to think that career is identity. Jamie feels this limits their options and creative thinking about career. “Working with” keeps options and creativity open.

She wants young people to explore LOTS of careers: Aou can never have a career you don’t know exists.

  • She teaches 5 jobs a day from childhood. She does this informally, through conversation and exposure to different careers.

For Career Exploration Jamie recommends that homeschooling parents help their homeschool high schoolers to be:

  • Involved in interests, at home and in classes or interest groups
  • Explore different practical skills (hands-on and other life skills)
  • Learn networking skills (Download Vicki’s Confidence for Meeting New People Skills freebie)
  • Learn advocacy skills (how to ask for what you want or need)
  • Learn financial and business skills (oh my, don’t miss this! Download 7Sisters popular Financial Literacy course)
  • Teaching teaching experiences, give them experiences in training younger siblings, friends, classes (think preschool at church)
  • Join various groups. (Jamie’s daughter is active in drama and 4H)
  • Volunteer with various career interests
  • Shadow and interview people in various careers
  • Discuss why teens are interested in various careers. Ie, if it is an interest in being a doctor, as you explore you might find that they hate blood but they like to help people. Maybe other helping professions like counseling will help.
  • Build an experiential resume starting 8th or 9th grade. Keep it ongoing. Download 7Sisters How to Write an Experiential Resume and keep it going.
  • Have LOTS of experiences!!
    • Experiences are truly one of the best ways to weed out or strengthen career interests. Jamie tells the story of her daughter wanting to be an archeologist until she spent the day with a group digging for sharks’ teeth. After a day of 101 degree heat, her daughter eliminated that career choice.

Jamie is now a career coach who speaks in libraries doing workshops in libraries. She also gives Brain Sorting Assessment, it helps them sort out their TRUE interests from what they randomly think their interests might be. The Brain Sort asks things like:

  • What’s on internet browser history
  • If they say they want to be an engineer, but they never explore STEM information. It makes you interested?
  • What are the various interests about the setting, skills, training of careers of interest
  • Where would you donate a million dollars?
  • What does that tells your teen?
  • What do you save up money for?
  • What do you buy?
  • What do you collect?
  • What are your habits?

Jamie says: Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job.

Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job. Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job- Jamie Beck during interview on Homeschool Highschool Podcast. How parents can be career coaches for their teens' Career Exploration program.

Vicki was so excited to talk to Jamie because of their shared love of Career Exploration. Jamie’s passion for helping teens understand themselves and truly explore best-fits is a hallmark of a true Career Coach.

As you know, 7SistersHomeschool.com has lots of articles on Career Exploration for homeschool highschoolers as well as our popular Career Exploration course.

To find Jamie, CareerVisionByJamie.com. Check out her resources and her Brain Sort. She helps match teens and colleges. She also hosts Career Vision Minute on Facebook.

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

This week on HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman.

HSHSP Ep 178: What's Good and Bad about Tech for Teens. Interview with Leah Nieman. Tools for parents for keeping teens safe and providing teens with great educational resources. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolAndTechnology #SafeDigialWorld #GreatEducationalTools #LeahNieman

 

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

Many of us homeschool moms are *digital immigrants*, we were around in the days before the internet and always feel like we are a step behind our kids in the things going on in the digital world. Our kids, on the other hand, are *digital natives* and tend to be very comfortable there. We moms worry about the safety of our children and teens when they are online.

That’s why I asked our friend and fellow homeschool mom, Leah Nieman (our favorite technology expert) to join us for a realistic discussion about the world of technology for those of us homeschool moms who are not experts ourselves. She shares with us what’s good and bad about tech for teens.

Leah Nieman

Leah Nieman. Photo used with permission.

The key issues that parents need to know about the online world include:

  • Privacy
  • Education of parents
    • Leah reminds us that where the parents are the teens don’t want to go. When parents are on Facebook, kids go to Instagram, then Snapchat, etc. So we need to stay up to date on information and maintain open communication with our homeschool high schoolers (and youngers).
  • Education of teens
    • Appropriate behavior in online classrooms,
    • Appropriate behavior and company outside the classroom
  • Safety on social platforms

What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens: Social Apps

It’s easy to read bad reports on the internet about social apps that only cover bad news. However, we don’t have to go to extremes and keep our homeschoolers off all social media. Rather, we need to be discerning and wise. When our young people come to us and want to download a new app, do some research and discuss what you find with them.

Parents should research:

  • What are the privacy settings. Can I limit who sees my child’s information?
  • Can I block and eliminate this app if it proves to be a poor choice?
  • Is my child’s location private?
  • Is the app targeted to kids but has *content buckets* (content buckets are sections of the app for different ages, children in one bucket, adults in another bucket). Can adults jump out of their content bucket into your kid’s bucket?
    • An example: Some apps have 2 content buckets. It’s easy for adults to get out of their bucket into the younger people’s bucket. This raises safety concerns because a young person may take at face value that a person is who they say they are. Vicki, in her job as mental health counselor has worked with young teens who thought they were talking with a peer on a social app but found out the hard way they were dealing with a predator.

Parents should keep conversations going:

When we parents are uneducated or overwhelmed we often want to stop the conversation about technology. However, we need to watch out when conversation stops! Kids get their information from peers if it doesn’t come from parents. Although we are uncomfortable we need to lean into uncomfortable topics by:

  • Being curious, ask questions
    • What do you like about it?
    • What is the draw for you?
  • Listening and allowing your kids to educate you. (Also, do your own research at LeahNieman.com)
    • Understand first, then ask questions.
  • Being open about your feelings, listen and be educated
  • Any topic we avoid is an open entry for danger

Some social apps that middle school and high schoolers use (don’t forget, mom, stay in the conversation with your homeschoolers about social apps:

  • Snapchat
  • Yubo (known as tender for teens). Here’s Leah’s informative post on Yubo.
  • Live.ly Live.me
    • These are for live streaming and live broadcasting
      • Live streaming: Like Facebook Lives, a person presents a topic. It is not spontaneous.
      • Live broadcasting is about connecting with peers, it is done in a stream of consciousness fashion, the intent is to connect, to create a social event. This can be a concern: who are your teens connecting with? Teens issue challenges like: Hey, do a dance, sing a song… and that is broadcast to the community. This can put a teen in a vulnerable position because of their lack of experience, discernment and natural impulsivity. Live broadcasting is popular with teens because they are targeted to teens, appeal to teens by connecting them. )
  • Tiktok is a top-ten download in Apple store. It was formerly called Music.ly.
    • Tiktok hass big draw for young kids (guidelines are supposed to be age 13 but many younger kids are on the app).
    • Young people create little videos and skits to music that is provided daily in a challenge. Kids like it because it has interactive community.
    • The concern for parents is the privacy. Adults  (strangers) are present on Tiktok. They can direct message your kids and share out onto other platforms.
    • Kids can create own accounts without parents knowing. They usually don’t know how to set privacy settings.
    • Leah talks about about setting up test account and is immediately asked for follows by young children who are yielding to pressure to grow their audience.

How do you keep kids safe:

The digital world is not all terrifying. There are great apps that are great tools for education. LeahNieman.com provides lots or information on great tools for homeschool families.

The digital world is not all terrifying. There are great apps that are great tools for education. We call it *gamified learning*. Check out Leah’s blog series with LOTS of great educational apps.

Some apps are good for tacking educational progress:

It’s a low pressure way to build skills, remediate and track progress. For example:

  • Spelling apps
  • Coding apps

Some apps are productivity apps.

  • As families with high schoolers, we can benefit with having a coordinated calendar app.
  • Project apps. Break down projects and progress through them.
    • When homeschool high schoolers learn productivity with an app, they can take that skill to college.
    • Leah loves using these apps herself. Google One-note to import her research and break down tasks. Then she puts the tasks on Google Task. She has a whole list of cool organization apps for teens.
    • Companies use Trello and Asana. Teens can benefit from learning how to use these as a resume builder. Team building experience and communication skills building. Digital soft skill building.
    • When information and tasks are gamified or made visually available, they progress better.

Check out this series on real-life, practical apps for homeschool families.

Leah also discussed the popularity of online games for teens. Leah likes online gaming. Here are her guidelines:

  • Know who they are playing with (just like you would never just drop teens off to an activity without knowing anything about it or who they will be with)
  • Make sure the gaming environment is safe.
  • Supervision and guidance is important. In other words, don’t avoid the conversations. Be curious, listen, the guide for safety. Kids like to talk about their online friendships, if we keep the communication doors open. We parents need to be interested and approachable so they feel free to talk.
  • Keep the balanced lifestyle. They need sunshine and exercises as much as they need their games. They need to do their lessons and do their activities of daily living (eating, chores, self-care). This is the modern version of teens only wanting to watch television all day long back in the 1970s.
  • Gaming is a good way to connect with their friends, they are genuinely interacting and helping each other. Digital soft skills development as individuals and teamwork.

Join Vicki and Leah for this enlightening discussion of what’s good and bad about tech for teens.

Visit Leah at:

LeahNieman.com (Sign up for Leah’s newsletter there and get a free set of conversation-starter questions.)

Facebook (lots of up to date information, current issues)

Youtube (SOOO much good information!)

You’ll also love our friend, Meryl’s podcast right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network: Homeschooling with Technology!

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School.

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School. Discussion of the different homeschooling methods for high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolHighschool

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

Sometimes we get questions about the 7SistersHomeschool.com’s philosophy of homeschooling. What is our educational philosophy? Wait for it…

Let’s start with these 2 vital concepts!

If you’ve known Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for any time at all (or our Sisters, Marilyn, Allison and Sara), you know our most important educational philosophy concept: There’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school!

There’s the right way for your child, for this year; for your family, for right now. But needs, goals and interests change. So that leads to a second educational philosophy concept: We have to be flexible if we want a healthy homeschool high school!

Now, let’s look at the different philosophies of homeschooling high school on an *educational philosophy continuum*.

What are the influential philosophies in homeschooling high school? There are a number of educational philosophies, so it helps to visualize them on a continuum from highly structured and rigid to and free-formed and flexible.

The truth is that in practice, most of us homeschooling parents really are *eclectic*. While we might like a certain philosophy, we usually find that in real life we need to mix and match.

  • We might need a teen to take a college class (highly structured) or an online class (usually highly structured)
  • We might want to take some Charlotte Mason approach classes through online programs like Dreaming Spires Home Learning (listen to our friend Kat’s discussions with Vicki about writing research papers, teaching Shakespeare and homeschooling in Britain).
  • We might find that our co-op classes lean toward the Classical model.
  • We might give our teens time each week to explore their own interests and have them log hours to earn an elective or Career Exploration credit.

These are all great ways to homeschool high school with an eclectic educational philosophy.

Back to the continuum: Different homeschool high school educational philosophies live on a continuum from rigid to flexible. Here are a few examples (remembering that there’s not a right or wrong way to homeschool high school).

On the highly-structured end of the continuum there’s School at Home

School at Home is a format that follows a set program (like Keystone or K12), with online classes similar to a classroom format. We sometimes call this *school in a box*.

Good thing: This is a great format for teens who love structure and following formats and rules.

Pitfall: Teens who don’t like lots of structure, or being slowed down by a *classroom setting*, will wrestle with boredom.

Also structured is Classical Education

One concept behind Classical Education is creating an infrastructure of learning. The Classical model of the comes from the ancient philosophers like Aristotle and Socrates and became the standard educational model of the Middle Ages. In Classical education, Latin is the foundation of all education and follows the structure of first learning Latin Grammar, then Rhetoric, then Logic.

Good thing: Homeschoolers who love Latin and critical thinking will LOVE Classical education. It really is a format that develops thinking minds.

Pitfall: For teens who are not linear thinkers (ADHD, creative thinkers), this model might be tougher.

Less structured is Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason’s educational format is based on reading, narrative, writing, beauty, observation and experience. It is a real-book and real-experience type of program. Usually the high-school level course have lots of rigor in the writing and reading components at the minimum.

Good thing: Teens learn to appreciate and notice beauty and become articulate in their communication styles.

Pitfall: For teens who do poorly with dictation and narration, they might feel lost.

Moderately structured is Goal-Driven Homeschooling

This is 7SistersHomeschool.com’s model (although we don’t believe in getting ulcers over anything formattish). When teens learn goal setting in high school, they have an important tool for success. They will need to be able to set goals through college, career, and life in general!

We believe that homeschooling high schoolers benefit by learning to set goals, so we work alongside our teens to help them set 2 types of goals:

Long term goals: What we want for them (and what they want for themselves) by the time they graduate- what kind of person do they want to become and life preparation do they need?

Short term goals: What we need to accomplish each year in order to meet those long-term goals.

Good thing: What our teens like about goal-driven education is that they know where they are going. What do they need for graduation? Career preparation? College preparation? Life-skills preparation? On the other hand, what if teens don’t learn to set goals? It’s like when you get in your car and start driving but don’t know where you’re going, you end up somewhere you don’t know…

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to goal setting might begin to feel pressured by the goals. Remember to be flexible, not perfectionistic.

NOTE: We also have a firm philosophy that homeschool high school curriculum should include no-busywork and be adaptable to different levels of rigor. Here’s a post explaining our curriculum philosophy.

Relaxed Homeschooling, Lifeschooling, Unschooling are on the far-end of the relaxed side of the continuum.

These are the educational philosophies on the relaxed end of the spectrum. The homeschooling high schooler chooses an interest and explores it in an in-depth, student-directed, delight-driven manner. There is not a structure. The idea is that if a teen is busy exploring a gift or interest, education will be an automatic outgrowth of the experience.

Good thing: These teens tend to be all-in, really invested in their interests. They know how to become subject matter experts in their giftings.

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to structure must learn to fit themselves into the box when they get their first jobs, or find a career that fits their learning style.

To wrap things up, here are some words of wisdom and advice:

  • When you think about what your family actually needs, you’ll probably find that you have needs for a bit of several of these styles.
  • No matter which way you homeschool, God is in charge of the outcome. Not you, God is in charge of the outcome. (Our fellow podcasters, Fletch and Kendra of Homeschooling in Real Life, often say this and they are correct.)
  • As our Sister Kym always says: Pray first, last and always.
  • If your homeschool high school philosophy is prayer oriented, your homeschool program is on the right track.
  • No matter what you plan, God might have another idea. Remember: A mom’s mind plans her way but God directs her path.

REMEMBER, there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school. Be happy with what fits your family best! And your teens best! And be ready to trash your method (or curriculum) anytime it is not working for you. We have so many choices!

Here’s a fun episode from our friend Melanie Wilson of Homeschool Sanity Podcast. It’s her Top 40 episodes and you’ll find information there to help empower you for homeschooling success.

Want some more information on Goal Setting?

5 Easy and Important Steps to Goal Setting for Homeschool High School

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

Want some homeschool high school mom community?

Join 7SistersHomeschool.com’s friendly Facebook group.

Like our Homeschool Highschool Podcast page.

Follow 7SistersHomeschool.com on Instagram.

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

HSHSP Ep 159: How to Enjoy Being Mom of a Just-Average Homeschool Teen

This week on HSHSP Ep 159: How to Enjoy Being Mom of a Just-Average Homeschool Teen.

HSHSP Ep 159: How to Enjoy Being Mom of a Just-Average Homeschool Teen. Help and hope for moms whose teens are EXACTLY who God made them to be: average. Then discover that ALL teens are gifted in God's eyes. #HomeschoolHighSchool #AverageHomeschoolTeens #FindingTeensGifts

HSHSP Ep 159: How to Enjoy Being Mom of a Just-Average Homeschool Teen

Your teens don’t have to go to Harvard to be exactly who God created them to be. Most teens are *just-average* in the ways that get big attention like academics, sports or arts! But God has given each teen gifts. Join Sabrina and Vicki for celebration of average homeschool teens with their giftedness from God!

It’s easy to fall into the trap that our homeschool high schoolers must perform extraordinarily in some area that gets big attention…or full-ride scholarships to college. Sometimes moms find themselves almost embarrassed if their teens don’t go to college or don’t do anything news-worthy. It’s an accidental thing in *American mom-ness* that we moms feel that we are failures if our teens aren’t famous.

SO let’s debunk this myth of the idea that only those teens who are gifted in academics, sports or arts are gifted. NO, all teens are gifted in God’s eyes! God gives each person a gift of something in order to bless His kingdom.

GOD makes all teens gifted. God's gifting is whatever God makes special in each teen. These gifts are there to be a blessing to the kingdom of God! #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #AverageHomeschoolTeen

AND let’s debunk the myth that average is bad. If average is bad, then God goofed up because statistically MOST teens are average. That’s what *average* means.

How can you enjoy being a mom of a just-average teen?

Join Vicki and Sabrina for a passionate discussion about enjoying being the mom of an average homeschool teen! We love our average teens. God loves them, too.

HSHSP Ep 159: How to Enjoy Being Mom of a Just-Average Homeschool Teen