Search Results for: critical thinking skills

Teaching Critical Thinking Skills through Literature

In this episode of Soft Skills 101, we interview Adam Pruzan, teacher extraordinaire at True North Homeschool Acaedemy, who shares with us how to use literature to teach Critical Thinking Skills.In this episode of Soft Skills 101, we interview Adam Pruzan, teacher extraordinaire at True North Homeschool Acaedemy, who shares with us how to use literature to teach Critical Thinking Skills.

Proverbs 4:6-7 Do not forsake wisdom, and she will protect you; love her, and she will watch over you. The beginning of wisdom is this: Get wisdom. Though it cost all you have, get understanding.

“Literature is the thought of thinking souls.” Thomas Carlyle

Classes taught by Adam Pruzan

World Religions, taught by Adam Pruzan

World History, taught by Adam Pruzan

Links to articles, podcasts, blogposts and places mentioned

Saint John’s College in NM

Founders Academy of Las Vegas

Sophecles

Plato

Clouds by Aristophanes

What is classical Christian Education 

Integration: The Benefits are Enormous blog post by Martin Detweiler, founder of Veritas Press.

Humor and Homeschooling

Wholesome Humor and Homeschooling

Active Listening Skills and Critical Thinking

Today I am joined by Dr. David Nehring to talk about Active Listening Skills. This is a simple formula that will build Critical Thinking Skills.Today I am joined by Dr. David Nehring to talk about Active Listening Skills. This is a simple formula that will build Critical Thinking Skills, as it requires attention to detail, empathy and understanding feelings, as well as empathy and compassion.

As you sit with someone to really listen to them by using Active Listening Skills:

  1. Be aware of yourself
  2. Clarify the goal of the conversation in your own head:
    • Are you wanting to just hear the person?
    • Gain mutual understanding?
    • Negotiate shared action?
    • Understand how much pain the other person is in?

Given what I am feeling and wanting, can I set that aside long enough to hear the other person?

  1. Gauge what the other person is wanting
  2. Clarify to the other person that what you are doing right now is “just listening”
  3. Say back some of what the person is saying
    1. The words they are saying
    2. The emotions behind what they are saying
    3. If all is going well, ask about the meaning of what they are saying
    4. Offer your understanding of what is being said as a question.
  4. Continue listening stance until either they say they’ve feel heard or you are saturated and need to pause the conversations in order to absorb what they are saying. Ask for a break as needed but commit to re-engage later.
  5. Continue the above until the person feels listened to and understood.
  6. After thinking about what is said, ask to reverse roles when the other person is ready.

Both sides probably need to go back and forth a few times before everyone is sufficiently heard.

The Goal is for the other person to hear you hearing them, see you seeing them, experience you experiencing them.

Recommended Reading:

Crucial Conversations 

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey 

Communication Challenges for Struggling Learners

5 Communication Strategies for Struggling Learners 

Celebrate Sukkot! ebook

Career Exploration Courses

As always we appreciate your listening, sharing and downloading this podcast!

Special Needs & Critical Thinking Skills

In this Podcast, we’ll continue our discussion of Critical Thinking Skills as I interview Amy Vickrey, Director of Special Needs Department at True North Homeschool Academy. We’ll be talking about how to help kids develop time and self-management techniques, talk about Meta-Cognition and so much more!In this Podcast, we’ll continue our discussion of Critical Thinking Skills as I interview Amy Vickrey, Director of Special Needs Department at True North Homeschool Academy. We’ll be talking about how to help kids develop time and self-management techniques, talk about Meta-Cognition and so much more!

Critical Thinking Skills are important for success, and might be of especial importance to those whose kids struggle with special needs, processing disorders, ADD or ADHD.

We’d love to hear your feed back, and of course, please listen, download, share and subscribe to this Podcast!

 

Live on-line courses, Academic Advising and Testing for Struggling Learners and Special Needs

TNHA Special Needs/ Struggling Learners Program

Informal Logic 

 

Websites

SPED Homeschool 

Diane Craft  

Articles, Book Reviews & Ted Talk

ADHA as a Difference in Cognition, Not a Disorder: Stephen Tonit  a TED Talk

Meta Cognition article explaining what it is

Career Readiness article and the importance of Critical Thinking Skills

Employability Skills article and the importance of Critical Thinking Skills

The Jr. High Brain article on developing brains and Critical Thinking Skills

Smart But Scattered Book Review

Dyslexia Outside the Box Book Review

Special Needs or Struggling Learner- What’s the Difference ? article explaining the difference between the Struggling Learner and the Special Needs Student

Tips for Creating Routines and Teaching Independence  help your kids learn to help themselves!

Creative Methods to Helping Special Needs Children Achieve their Goals Special Needs Kids can meet their goals!

Find more episodes from Soft Skills 101 Podcast here!

Non-tech skills students learn from coding

Non-techSkills Students Learn From Coding

144: Non-tech skills students learn from coding

There are many non-tech skills students learn from coding. This means learning to program is useful even when students don’t decide to pursue a degree where programming is core to it. These are the skills i talk about in this episode:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Logic
  • Problem Solving
  • Project Planning
  • Perseverance
  • Attention to detail
  • Creativity

Students will also learn humility.

Show sponsor FundaFunda offers the following programming classes:

Special offer for August 2021:

Share about this podcast on any of your social media accounts, or in online forums, Google groups etc OR leave a rating and review on the podcast player you use, then take a photo or screenshot and email it to meryl@fundafunda.com. Everyone who does that can select ANY $20 web-based unit study from sponsor FundaFunda Academy.

————————————————————————————————–
Take a look at show sponsor, FundaFunda Aademy to see what they offer for online classes and web-based unit studies.

Join our Facebook Group especially for the listeners of this podcast! You can ask questions and get advice as you try integrating technology in your homeschool.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and give a rating and maybe even a review! Subscribing will help you make sure you never miss an episode.

Non-techSkills Students Learn From Coding

Rethinking College

But whether you and/or your student have a clear plan or not, CLEP-ing out of their gen-eds is always the wisest way to go. Rethinking College

Welcome to this episode of Life Skills 101! This week the topic of this podcast is Rethinking College.

With the rising cost of college, it’s important for parents to take time to evaluate with their students, the academic, financial and world view Return on their Investment (ROI) of college costs and debt. The average college graduate (does not include students who do not graduate but still have debt), takes 6 years, not 4 to graduate, with an average of over $35,000 in debt

A college degree is no longer necessary for a rewarding career or to ensure an upwardly mobile life-style. In fact, crippling college debt can make the American Dream an impossibility!

As parents, how do we guide and direct our young adults as they plan for the future?

In this episode, we explore ways that students can get a head start on college, by starting by taking CLEP or  Dual Enrollment courses, specifically targeting Gen Ed Courses.

General Education Requirements:

    • 6 credits of English.
    • 3-6 of Math
    • 3-9 of Science
    • 3-6 of Social Science
    • 3-6 of Diversity
    • You can get an associates, or even a bachelors from the Big Three of the CLEP world. These are
      • Thomas Edison
      • Excelsior
      • Charter Oaks

It makes good sense for young adults to learn how to navigate the digital world. Starting an online business in high school can set them up for future success, setting up an online educational business is even better as the online education market is estimated to be between an over $350 billion dollar market by 2025.

Students should consider what kind of life-style do they want to have as adults and work backwards from there. What kind of training, income and skills will they need to attain that? The future will demand that our young adults have Critical Thinking Skills, Adaptability and Flexibility and the ability to Collaborate.

Below are resources offered by True North to help families navigate the rapidly changing world of college.

Special Replay: Life Skills For Kids

Life Skills | With the advance in technology many major, must-know life skills are forgotten. In this episode, we roll up our sleeves and discuss the important life skills you kids must learn. | #podcast #homeschoolpodcast #lifeskillsSpecial Replay:  Must Know Life Skills – Episode 343

With the advance in technology many major, must-know life skills are forgotten. In this episode, we roll up our sleeves and discuss the important life skills you kids must learn.

With smartphones, there is ready to access information on any imaginable topic – yet our children are at a disadvantage without this handy tool. By life skills, I don’t mean foraging in the forest to hunt and gather, better known as survival skills.

Here is my list and please add to this with your own ideas:

Personal Life Skills

Faith

  1. Convictions – Why you believe what you do
  2. Can you articulate your belief to others
  3. Can you defend your beliefs
  4. A hard look at your faith – and your relationship with Jesus

 

Communication – Verbal and Non-Verbal

    1. The ability to explain what you mean in a few words
    2. To be respectful and allow others to speak
    3. To listen when others talk and answer the question
    4. Cell phone etiquette – and oral communication
    5. The eyes and posture tell what you think

Critical thinking

    1. To realize that we must think for ourselves – but our parents have our best interests at heart!
    2. To realize that everything we read online is not a truth
    3. The ability to make decisions and solve problems
    4. How to resolve a bad decision
    5. Consequence

Control of Self and Opinion

      1. Everyone does not have to agree with you
      2. Everyone who does not agree with you is not wrong
      3. Allow others to have an opinion however know the difference between opinion and fact
      4. Anger management
      5. Stand by your convictions and know that “your own truth” or “he that defines the term wins” is just talk to make you doubt that you can have convictions.
      6. Self-awareness
      7. Empathy for others

Coping with Stress

    1. Daily stress happens how do you handle it?
    2. What are good ways to cope?
    3. What are bad ways to cope?
    4. How can you have less stress in your life?

 

Practical Life Skills

    1. Cooking, cleaning, hygiene and taking care of yourself.
      1. Make a sandwich or an entire meal.
      2. Do laundry.
      3. Plan a grocery trip and meals – comparing prices
      4. Clothing shopping and sales!
      5. Personal hygiene and why
      6. How to clean a house – a room!
      7. How to change a light bulb or do simple home repairs
      8. Order at a restaurant
    2. Money management
      1. (Allowance or earn money) – Save – Spend – Tithe
      2. Checking or savings accounts
      3. Understanding credit and why it should be avoided
      4. The difference between credit and debit
      5. Planning for the future
      6. Understanding household budgets
      7. Cost of goods – home, car, food, clothing, etc.
    3. Education and Learning
      1. Are you self motivated?
      2. Where do you find your information?
      3. Do you know about primary sources and what this means?
      4. Can you teach yourself? How?
    4. Writing
      1. Communication in the written form
      2. How to address an envelope
      3. How to write a nice email – or what should be in an email.
    5. Directions
      1. Can you follow a GPS
      2. Can you use a map?
      3. Do you know your general directions (N – S- E – W)
    6. Transportation
      1. How do you go from place to place
      2. Do you understand busses, subways, etc. if you are in a big city?
      3. Do you know how to maintain a car?
      4. Change the oil – or the tires?
      1. Insurance
      2. Social security cards
      3. Medication and things that do not mix
      4. Drinking / Driving etc.
      5. What doesn’t go in the microwave
      6. Cars and carbon monoxide

 

 

 

 

Teaching kids soft skills for digital communication

Teaching Kids Soft Skills for Digital Communication

Episode 60: Teaching Kids Soft Skills for Digital Communication – interview with Lisa Nehring

Lisa Nehring from True North Homeschool Academy and the Soft Skills 101 podcast is the guest on today’s show. She shares with us some of the soft skills for digital communication we need to teach our children.

Learn more about the importance of soft skills in this article by Lisa Nehring.

Some of the topics covered in this episode that you should be talking to your children about are:

1) checking and responding to emails/messages in a reasonable time frame
2) using good grammar in online communication
3) considering tone in emails, and knowing when to speak to a person rather than use digital communication
4) digital communication lasts forever
5) integrity in online communication

Don’t assume your children understand these things. I encourage you to listen to the full episode to hear all the wisdom Lisa shares with us as we discuss this important topic.

For more on this topic, read Lisa’s blog post on teaching effective online communication.

In this episode we highlight show sponsor, FundaFunda Academy’s, Art of Argument online class for teens. In this class they will learn about logical fallacies and pratice writing argumentative essays.

Subscribe to the podcast so you don’t miss future episodes.

And be sure to join our Facebook group where we can talk about this together.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and give a rating and maybe even a review!

Contact Meryl via email on meryl@mediaangels.com or connect with her on Pinterest, Instagram, and Facebook


Thank you to our Sponsor – A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Movie!

Tom Hanks portrays Mister Rogers in A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD, a timely story of kindness triumphing over cynicism, based on the true story of a real-life friendship between Fred Rogers and journalist Tom Junod. After a jaded magazine writer (Emmy winner Matthew Rhys) is assigned a profile of Fred Rogers, he overcomes his skepticism, learning about kindness, love and forgiveness from America’s most beloved neighbor.

Critical Thinking with Lisa Nehring

In this episode we’ll define Critical Thinking skills, examine why they are necessary and begin to talk about how to teach them.Critical Thinking skills are “An ability to use reason to move beyond the acquisition of facts to uncover deep meaning,” according to Robert Weissberg.

 

In this episode we’ll define Critical Thinking skills, examine why they are necessary and begin to talk about how to teach them.

 

Word Study: Critical Thinking Skills come from the Greek word “Kriticos” (meaning discerning judgement) and “criterion” (meaning standards). Critical Thinking Skills mean the word implies the development of “discerning judgment based on standards.”

 

A critical thinker can deduce as well as infer- they are both an information gathering and a problem solver.

Someone with critical thinking skills is able to do the following:

  • Solve problems systematically and sequentially with the ability to communicate them clearly
  • Understand and identify important ideas and to whom they are relevant
  • Make logical connections between ideas, across subject matter and time
  • Create, organize, deliver and evaluate arguments
  • Identify inconsistencies, errors and fallacies in reasoning
  • Reflect on, identify and offer an apologetic for one’s own core beliefs and values

Critical thinkers are constantly building upon their knowledge and experience. They are able to integrate how data and information can be used to develop, recognize and predict patterns of knowledge and behavior.

How do we teach Critical Thinking?

 

“Critical thinking skills are far more predictive of making positive life decisions than raw intelligence.” ~ Heather Butler

Resources for Teaching Critical Thinking

Fall Freebie- Bucket List! 

Perpeloxors (deductive reasoning puzzles) 

Tropes –figures of speech, such as simile, metaphor, alliteration, etc.

Logic- formal and informal

Scientific Method 

Brainchallenges 

https://www.facebook.com/LegendaryShots/videos/377986663112031/

Using Propoganda to teach critical thinking skills 

Laughter and Critical Thinking 

 

 

 

 

http://www.jamesbowman.me/post/socratic-questions-infographic.pdf

http://www.rotmanithink.ca/

 

 

Life Skills For Kids

Life Skills | With the advance in technology many major, must-know life skills are forgotten. In this episode, we roll up our sleeves and discuss the important life skills you kids must learn. | #podcast #homeschoolpodcast #lifeskillsMust Know Life Skills – Episode 343

With the advance in technology many major, must-know life skills are forgotten. In this episode, we roll up our sleeves and discuss the important life skills you kids must learn.

With smartphones, there is ready to access information on any imaginable topic – yet our children are at a disadvantage without this handy tool. By life skills, I don’t mean foraging in the forest to hunt and gather, better known as survival skills.

Here is my list and please add to this with your own ideas:

Personal Life Skills

Faith

  1. Convictions – Why you believe what you do
  2. Can you articulate your belief to others
  3. Can you defend your beliefs
  4. A hard look at your faith – and your relationship with Jesus

 

Communication – Verbal and Non-Verbal

    1. The ability to explain what you mean in a few words
    2. To be respectful and allow others to speak
    3. To listen when others talk and answer the question
    4. Cell phone etiquette – and oral communication
    5. The eyes and posture tell what you think

Critical thinking

    1. To realize that we must think for ourselves – but our parents have our best interests at heart!
    2. To realize that everything we read online is not a truth
    3. The ability to make decisions and solve problems
    4. How to resolve a bad decision
    5. Consequence

Control of Self and Opinion

      1. Everyone does not have to agree with you
      2. Everyone who does not agree with you is not wrong
      3. Allow others to have an opinion however know the difference between opinion and fact
      4. Anger management
      5. Stand by your convictions and know that “your own truth” or “he that defines the term wins” is just talk to make you doubt that you can have convictions.
      6. Self-awareness
      7. Empathy for others

Coping with Stress

    1. Daily stress happens how do you handle it?
    2. What are good ways to cope?
    3. What are bad ways to cope?
    4. How can you have less stress in your life?

 

Practical Life Skills

    1. Cooking, cleaning, hygiene and taking care of yourself.
      1. Make a sandwich or an entire meal.
      2. Do laundry.
      3. Plan a grocery trip and meals – comparing prices
      4. Clothing shopping and sales!
      5. Personal hygiene and why
      6. How to clean a house – a room!
      7. How to change a light bulb or do simple home repairs
      8. Order at a restaurant
    2. Money management
      1. (Allowance or earn money) – Save – Spend – Tithe
      2. Checking or savings accounts
      3. Understanding credit and why it should be avoided
      4. The difference between credit and debit
      5. Planning for the future
      6. Understanding household budgets
      7. Cost of goods – home, car, food, clothing, etc.
    3. Education and Learning
      1. Are you self motivated?
      2. Where do you find your information?
      3. Do you know about primary sources and what this means?
      4. Can you teach yourself? How?
    4. Writing
      1. Communication in the written form
      2. How to address an envelope
      3. How to write a nice email – or what should be in an email.
    5. Directions
      1. Can you follow a GPS
      2. Can you use a map?
      3. Do you know your general directions (N – S- E – W)
    6. Transportation
      1. How do you go from place to place
      2. Do you understand busses, subways, etc. if you are in a big city?
      3. Do you know how to maintain a car?
      4. Change the oil – or the tires?
      1. Insurance
      2. Social security cards
      3. Medication and things that do not mix
      4. Drinking / Driving etc.
      5. What doesn’t go in the microwave
      6. Cars and carbon monoxide

 

 

 

 

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading

LCP Ep 12: Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading

 

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading with Literary Cafe Podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reading #higherorderthinkingskills #criticalthinkingskills #languageartsAre you wondering what we mean by “higher order thinking skills” or “critical thinking skills”?

And what do you do with them and how do you teach them to your children? And how are you supposed to do that with reading?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she explains what higher order thinking skills are, why they are important, and how you can practice them with your children in fun and easy ways.

 

Show Notes

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills with Your Reading

Different Levels and Kinds of Higher Order Thinking Skills

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Thinking skills can be organized in a hierarchy of difficulty (and also according to stage of child and learning development). In other words, from least to most difficult and acquired as a child ages.

For a detailed description of these thinking skills, what they look like in your child, why they are important, and how to practice using them in easy and fun ways, you will want to listen to the podcast.

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a method of labeling and describing the different levels of thinking skills and what they entail.

Knowledge or Remembering – This thinking skill is the ability to recall information and details or memorize facts or words.

Comprehension or Understanding – This skill requires the need to understand the meanings of the words and what they mean when used together in phrases or sentences to express an idea. Your child needs to have the vocabulary knowledge and the capacity to understand the concept being presented.

Application or Applying – Not only does this skill require understanding and comprehension of something, but also the ability to take that learned and understood information and apply it to a similar situation.

Analysis or Analyzing – This skill requires understanding something and making connections in what is being read or studied because the connections are not spelled out or clearly identified for the learner. The learner has to make the connections on his or her own.

Synthesis or Revising – This thinking skill allows your child to make a leap or build new thoughts based on the connections they’ve made using the other thinking skills we’ve been discussing – formulating what they are comprehending, learning, and connecting from the reading and making something new or forming new thoughts from all of this.

Evaluation – This is where your child learns to make a judgment about something, form an opinion or make a decision.

Question Starters to Practice Different Levels of Thinking Skills

Bloom’s Question Starters Handout

Higher Order Thinking Question Stems Handout

Suggested Activities to Practice Using Different Levels of Thinking Skills

Recalling and retelling information through retelling what your learner has heard during a read aloud of a short story or chapter.

Graphic Organizers or Mind Mapping – Use these to practice thinking skills and organize and use different concepts or ideas.

Graphic Organizers to Print

Mind Map Examples for Different Topics

Activities and Projects Related to a Book (Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literature Study) – using different kinds of thinking skills and learning styles

Podcast and Show Notes with Handout for Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literature Study

Have your learner create his or her own assessment to either give to another learner or themselves – a quiz, test, paper, project – and have them write it to include different levels of thinking skills. They would also need an answer key or something to evaluate the outcome of the assessment, requiring them to use even more thinking skills.

Have your learner create a lesson plan around your book, maybe literary devices or techniques, story elements used in the book, or character analysis. Have him or her include a lesson to present with created visual aides, guided practice opportunity with the class like an activity, game, or class practice, and an assessment like a quiz, practice worksheet, or other assignment.

Consciously making the effort and taking time to incorporate different levels of questions or activities or projects not only can make reading more interesting but definitely expands your learner’s thinking abilities and prepares them for knowing how to think – and not just answer questions only requiring recall.

This helps to develop our problem solvers, innovators, creators, and leaders of tomorrow.

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share about using and practicing thinking skills  that your family has found helpful! Or, if you found any ideas here helpful or have any questions! I would love to hear from you!

Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for March’s topic when we discuss developing language skills in your younger learners. I have all kinds of practical and fun ways to get your early learners reading and writing and loving it! We are also going to be tying it to Dr. Seuss’ birthday which is also celebrated in March!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page! And make sure you share this page with other homeschoolers with middle and high schoolers and are wondering how to get started writing in these grade levels!

 

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading with Literary Cafe Podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reading #higherorderthinkingskills #criticalthinkingskills #languagearts