Favorite Homeschooling Books – Philosophy

favorite homeschooling booksThere’s just something about winter that lends itself to reading. It’s that time of year for comfort food, a favorite hot drink, and curling up by a fire with a good book. There are even cultural traditions centered around reading during the winter months.

In Iceland, they celebrate something called Jolabokaflod, or “Christmas Book Flood.” Everyone exchanges books and on Christmas Eve and the whole family stays up all night reading their new tomes and nibbling on chocolate. Oh yes…I could adopt such a tradition!

I think it is important for us to encourage in ourselves the habit of reading, and perhaps more so with being lifeschoolers, as our children will naturally follow in our footsteps. The old phrase, “more is caught than is taught,” has much truth to it and lately I have been more focused on trying to improve such areas of weakness that I see mirrored in my own children!

Despite my love for reading, I could definitely work to be more intentional about it. And as a busy lifeschooling mom, I imagine you could use some work here, too! I also believe it is important to stay sharp in our “profession,” so in the spirit of continuing education, I thought I would take the next two episodes to introduce to you some of my favorite homeschooling books in the hopes that they may become yours, as well. They have made an impact on my lifeschooling journey, as I am sure they will for yours.

I’ve decided to divide the books up into two sections, and subsequently two separate podcast episodes. I’m sure I could further subdivide them, but I’ve found that when reading about homeschooling, there are generally two categories that everything falls into: Educational Philosophy and Practical Methods.

In order to know how to teach, you must first know why to teach it. You have to first come to a fundamental understanding about what education actually is. But all philosophy and no methodology can leave a teacher feeling a bit lost. So once the philosophy is firmly established, it’s important to also have some practical books on how to carry out the educational process.

I encourage you to check these books out and commit to reading some new books this year! While I have read parts of all of these books, there are some that I have not yet finished. But I want to recommend them because I have read enough to infer their value and usefulness.

Educational Philosophy

The following are books that have helped shape my educational philosophy of “lifeschooling.”

Gifted: Raising Children Intentionally by Chris Davis

Pioneer homeschooler Chris Davis is most responsible for solidifying my personal educational philosophy. Years ago, I read a blog post he wrote about education and finding our children’s gifts and I excitedly read it aloud to my husband and shared it with just about everyone I knew! It was just the validation I needed that what I felt deep in my heart was true and would, in fact, work in reality. Chris started homeschooling in the 70s and 80s before it was even legal. He graduated three boys who, despite a very different educational philosophy and practice, have all gone on to be successful.

It is impossible to narrow it down to one, but one of my favorite parts of the book is where he talks about the importance of blessing our children and calling out the gifts we see in them. We have a responsibility, as parents, to help identify and name those gifts we see in our children.

Once we have done this, we must do two things in order to help our child develop these gifts. 1. We must resource what that child needs and 2. We must gift the child “sufficient time to become eminently qualified in the field of his giftings.” Davis did this by purchasing a large amount of computer programming books for his son, who had an interest in learning “all the computer programs currently in use.” Today he is a very successful computer programmer and owns his own business.

Upgrade: 10 Secrets to the Best Education for Your Child by Kevin Swanson

This is one of the simplest, yet profound books on education that I have ever read. It succinctly breaks down the idea of education and what makes it a “good” one. This would be a book that I could hand to another parent without “offending” them and I believe it would have them convinced to homeschool by the first or second chapter. The reason why is that it takes such a practical, logical approach that is hard to argue with.

Here are the 10 secrets laid out in the book:

  1. The preeminence of character
  2. Quality one-on-one instruction
  3. The principle of protection
  4. The principle of individuality
  5. The rooting in relationships
  6. The principle of doing the basics well
  7. The principle of life integration
  8. Maintaining the honor and mystique of learning
  9. Build on the right foundation
  10. The principle of wise, sequential progression

I had the opportunity a couple years ago to be interviewed by Kevin Swanson at his home studio for one of his podcast episodes, Why Most Schooling is a Waste of Time, and it was funny to see how many similarities we had in our educational philosophy. He thought I had read his book. . . but it turned out that we had both just read another Book the had helped shape our thinking into something very similar!

Dumbing Us Down by John Taylor Gatto

This was another book that profoundly impacted my belief in homeschooling as not only a valid form of education, but the best form. John Taylor Gatto was an educator in the public school system of New York City for more than 30 years and even won the Teacher of the Year award. But his methods and beliefs were far from typical or conformist. Sadly, he passed away just last year, but he left a huge impact on the field of education. . . to those wise enough to listen.

In this book, Gatto starts by telling us “what he does wrong” as a school teacher. In his words, what he does that is right is simple to understand, “I get out of kids’ way, I give them space and time and respect.” But in carrying out his expected duties as a public educator, he instead teaches:

  1. Confusion
  2. Class position
  3. Indifference
  4. Emotional dependency
  5. Intellectual dependency
  6. Provisional self-esteem
  7. One can’t hide

These may seem like radical assertions. However, when you understand the history of public education and why it was instituted, they become obvious and self-explanatory. Gatto does a good job going into this background information so that the reader can better grasp his seemingly-radical propositions.

What makes such assertions even more shockingly ironic is that fact that this entire section is a direct copy of his acceptance speech for the award of 1991 New York State Teacher of the Year! I wonder if anyone clapped?

Einstein Never Used Flash Cards by Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D., and Roberta Michick Golinkoff, Ph.D.

Life got in the way and I never completed this book, but it is one I hope to pick up again in the new year. I enjoyed the authors’ perspectives as scientists because they were able to counter some popular myths by showing how scientific studies on learning have often been manipulated and misinterpreted. One such myth is the “Mozart Effect”: the idea that if you expose your child to classical music at a young age will help them become smarter. They are also strong proponents of allowing children to learn through play, including one chapter called “Play: The Crucible of Learning.”

The Joy of Relationship Homeschooling: When the One Anothers Come Home by Karen Campbell

I am currently thoroughly enjoying reading a book called “The Joy of Relationship Homeschooling.” Though we didn’t interact much, I actually went to college with the author’s daughter and had no idea she was homeschooled, let alone the daughter of a homeschool pioneer who wrote books and spoke at conventions. I didn’t discover that until just recently!

This is another book that would be beneficial not just to homeschooling moms, but to moms everywhere. Karen’s goal is to help us see that the most important aspect of homeschooling is not academics, but relationships. It is about practicing the “one anothers” of Scripture: Love one another, submit to one another, etc.

I love this quote: “Typically, the first question asked by new homeschoolers is, ‘What curriculum should we use?’ assuming that academic success ought to be the first priority. And yet, if happiness in life is most fully measured by the success of our relationships, why is it so rare to hear someone talk about the dynamics involved in building sound relationships, especially those based on the commands given in Scripture?”

Karen drives home the point of the importance of relationships in homeschooling with a story about a “famous” homeschool veteran in her town with whom she was excited to have the opportunity to chat. She was surprised, however, when this revered leader asked her, “Karen, can you tell me how to have a relationship with my grown children?” With tears in her eyes, she asked, “Why are we not friends?” This woman had missed out on the greatest opportunity that homeschooling affords us: the chance to build deeply-rooted relationships with our children.

 

I hope this overview has given you a good place to start with planning your 2019 reading list! We often work hard to plan our children’s curricula, but forget that learning never stops and we are as much in need of continuing education as they are. Be sure you set aside time this year for your own learning! Next time, we will talk about some great homeschooling books to help with the practical aspects of choosing curricula, planning, and organizing. That’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Subscribe to our podcast so you never miss an episode!

Lifeschooling with Boys – Hal and Melanie Young

Hal and Melanie Young - boysOn this episode of Life as a Lifeschooler, I talk with Hal and Melanie Young about their homeschooling/lifeschooling journey and about what that looked like with boys.

Hal & Melanie are the award-winning authors of Raising Real Men, My Beloved and My Friend: How to Be Married to Your Best Friend Without Changing Spouses, and several other books. They are publishers, writers, bloggers, and popular conference speakers internationally, known for their Christ-centered focus and practical, real-life stories. They are the parents of six real boys (four grown!) and two real girls and live in noisy, messy happiness in North Carolina.

Here are some of the questions I asked in our interview:

I’m sure many of my listeners have heard you both speak, but tell us about your background. How did you start homeschooling?

Many homeschoolers bring the school model home because we all tend to just do what we know. Is there anything in particular that helped shape your educational philosophy?

The definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents primarily through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” In your family, I know that mission aspect plays a large part. Can you share with us how your mission in encouraging homeschoolers played a part in your homeschooling? (In particular, with regard to technical skills, etc. that were learned in that context.)

How has homeschooling strengthened your relationships with your children?

What has been one of the most difficult times of homeschooling in your family?

What are some of the gifts that you saw early on in your children and how were you able to tailor their education around the development of those gifts?

When it comes to raising boys, tell us some practical tips, especially for those of us with very active young boys who can be hard to homeschool.

Hal and Melanie Young can be found at HalAndMelanie.com and their podcast can be heard at HalAndMelanie.com/radio. You can purchase their books and also find many other wonderful homeschooling books and resources, as well as gifts especially for boys in their online store at RaisingRealMen.com/shop.  Or if you need ideas, check out their special gift guide for boys at RaisingRealMen.com/giftguideforboys. (I mentioned Christmas gifts in the podcast, as this was recorded earlier, but there’s always time to shop for next year, right?!)

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!

Lifeschooling and The Arts (Part 2) – Lorina Harris

Lifeschooling and the arts part 2(There is a bit of an echo in this recording. Apologies!)

In part 2 of my interview with Lorina Harris, we focus more on what their own homeschool looks like.

We start with a discussion of the importance of art with regard to academics. Studies have shown that involvement in the arts actually boosts test scores among students. There is something to be said for exercising both the left and right sides of our brains. As Lorina points out, all the various arts–music, acting, visual arts–help us learn to study detail and see things we are not used to looking for. There are subtle nuances we miss as mere observers that are gleaned when actually studying these creative disciplines as students. This skill of observation is transferable to many other subjects and areas, including business and entrepreneurship.

Lorina and I also talk a bit about the connection between music and math and how that has helped her son, in particular. We talk also about their family’s methods and philosophy of homeschooling. Lorina has always tried to expose her children to many different types of experiences and field trips, showing them how learning relates to real life and developing a love for learning in her children. Even during the fun times, there has always been a focus on learning. Video games are educational-based, for example, and not just mindless entertainment.

She relies heavily on “living books” and doing what works for their family rather than relying on rigid curriculum or highly structured co-ops and classes. As she puts it, “I don’t believe there’s a curriculum out there you could follow fully 100% and get everything you need for your particular family.” With such an emphasis on books, her daughter in particular has grown to love reading and we talk about some of the challenges of a voracious reader who needs to be constantly “fed”!

I ask Lorina how homeschooling has strengthened the relationships she has with her children. “We have a different kind of connection. We’re closer. My daughter considers me her best friend and I’m thrilled that she says that out loud to her friends.” She talks about the importance of talking to our children and being honest about our mistakes and weaknesses.

We talk at the end about Lorina’s art studio and her plans to begin offering online art classes. She also currently offers sketch excursions in the D.C. area and around the world. And in January, she will be launching a podcast called “Be Inspired Now” available on iTunes. You can find Lorina on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheArtSmartstudio and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/theartsmartlady.

Did you miss part 1 of this interview? Go here to listen now!

Lifeschooling and The Arts (Part 1) – Lorina Harris

lifeschooling and the artsEpisode 23

Lorina Harris is married to her husband, Cornelis, and they have two children that they have homeschooled for 18 years. Originally from Queens New York, Lorina has had the pleasure of being raised seeing great art in the museums and galleries, of NYC. Lorina started and completed her baseline year at the University Of Hartford Art School, but ended up studying and graduating from the Amsterdam School of the Arts with a degree in fine arts, teaching art, and art history at the highest level in the Netherlands. She has had the honor of participating in numerous solo, and group exhibitions, both in Europe and in the United States. Lorina now owns and operates a small art studio in MD where she works, holds Visual Art Parties, teaches art classes and private lessons, in addition to lifeschooling her two amazing children.

Here are some questions I asked Lorina:

You and I met at one of Rhea Perry’s Educating for Success conferences several years ago and clicked because we’re both artists and I know you do school in a more lifeschooling manner.

First of all, I just have to ask… Do you do art with your children? I am horrible about that! But I know you have a business with your art, so I’m wondering if that makes it more of a natural part of your homeschooling?

Tell us more about your family’s homeschooling journey.

Many homeschoolers bring the school model home because we all tend to just do what we know. Is there anything in particular that helped shape your educational philosophy?

Do you think art is an important part of education for our children?

I know that being in Rhea’s inner circle group, your family is really focused on entrepreneurship. Tell us how your children have pursued their gifts and used them to create businesses that bring in an income.

How has homeschooling strengthened your relationships with your children?

How do you fit homeschooling with your family’s unique situation and responsibilities?

Has your family ever been tempted to quit homeschooling and how did you navigate through that time?

If you wold like to learn more about Lorina’s online or in-studio art classes, you can visit her at www.theartsmartlady.com or her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/TheArtSmartstudio/

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Be sure to subscribe to this podcast so you never miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!

Missions, Movies, and Lifeschooling (Part 2) – David Cook

Missions, Movies, Lifeschooling - David Cook part 2

On this episode of Life as a Lifeschooler, Danielle wraps up her interview with David Cook, a former MK who was homeschooled and now works in the Christian movie industry.

David grew up on the mission field in Spain. A homeschool graduate, in 2001 he started working in media, both radio and television in Spain. In 2009 God placed it on his heart to get involved with feature filmmaking. Moving back to the United States, David started working with Advent Film Group to start the learning process and get hands on experience on film sets. Since that point, David has worked on 18 feature films in various capacities, including The Screenwriters, Polycarp, Princess Cut, Beyond the Mask, Badge of Faith, War Room, Like Arrows, and most recently the upcoming films Overcomer and Once Upon a Time in Mongolia.  David also helps with the annual Christian Worldview Film Festival in Franklin, TN, where he enjoys sharing with others what he has learned and encouraging them to follow what God has placed on their hearts to do.

Here are some of the questions I asked David on this second part of the interview:

Tell us about your journey into the Christian film industry.

When did you start to develop an interest in Christian film and did your parents tailor the education around the development of your gifts and interest in film?

What has been the most exciting thing about being in film? What has been the biggest challenge?

What was your favorite film set to work on?

I know you do a lot of traveling with your work. How many countries have you traveled to while working in film?

For those who may have children interested in getting into film, what would you suggest?

If you want to find out more about the Christian Worldview Film Festival, you can visit their site here.

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Subscribe to our podcast so you never miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!

 

Missions, Movies, and Lifeschooling (Part 1) – David Cook

Missions, Movies, and Lifeschooling - David CookOn this episode of Life as a Lifeschooler, Danielle talks to David Cook, a former MK who was homeschooled and now works on many of the Christian film sets.

David grew up on the mission field in Spain. A homeschool graduate, in 2001 he started working in media, both radio and television in Spain. In 2009 God placed it on his heart to get involved with feature filmmaking. Moving back to the United States, David started working with Advent Film Group to start the learning process and get hands on experience on film sets. Since that point, David has worked on 18 feature films in various capacities, including The Screenwriters, Polycarp, Princess Cut, Beyond the Mask, Badge of Faith, War Room, Like Arrows, and most recently the upcoming films Overcomer and Once Upon a Time in Mongolia.  David also helps with the annual Christian Worldview Film Festival in Franklin, TN, where he enjoys sharing with others what he has learned and encouraging them to follow what God has placed on their hearts to do.

Here are the some of the questions I ask David on this first part of the interview:

Tell us about what your homeschooling situation looked like.

The definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents primarily through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” Is there a part of that definition that particularly speaks to you in light of how your family homeschooled?

How did homeschooling strengthen your relationships with your siblings? I know you now work with your siblings on set quite often. Tell us about that.

How did your parents fit homeschooling with mission work and all the responsibilities that came with that?

Were there any particularly rough patches with homeschooling and how did your family navigate through that time?

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Be sure to subscribe to the podcast so you don’t miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!

Mentorship and Lifeschooling – Craig and Deana Thompson

Mentorship and Lifeschooling - Craig and Deana Thompson

One of the most inspiring and impactful ways to help educate our children is through mentorship. On this episode of Life as a Lifeschooler, I had the opportunity to talk with Craig and Deana Thompson, who have helped each of their children through an intense and amazing mentorship program that Craig designed for them.

Craig and Deana reside in Tennessee. Craig is the owner of an internet company and is the editor of Preaching through Proverbs and is also currently writing a mentoring curriculum and related books. Craig and Deana have successfully graduated two children and are currently homeschooling four. They believe in a global education for their children and have participated in numerous mission trips throughout the world, both before and after having their children.

Here are some of the questions I asked Craig and Deana on this episode:

  • Craig, I met you at Rhea Perry’s Educating for Success conference and we didn’t get to talk much, but I was just so impressed with your daughter, who was actually one of the speakers that year. She gave an amazing presentation about her year of mentorship that you set up for her, and I just remember being blown away by her level of maturity and her ability to engage the audience at her young age.
  • I know she attributed much of her personal growth and maturity to the mentorship program you created. Tell us more about that.
  • What was your purpose in creating this program and who do you think it’s suited for?
  • Did you always homeschool this way? Tell us a bit about your homeschooling/lifeschooling journey.
  • Deana, how did you fit this mentorship program in with the homeschooling that you were already doing?
  • As you know, the definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents primarily through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” Is there a part of that definition that particularly speaks to you and share with us a bit more about how your family lifeschools?
  • What are some of the gifts that you have seen in your children and how did mentorship help with the development of those gifts?

You can purchase Craig’s mentorship program at www.52GodlyMen.com and you can see some of his daughter’s videos on her mentorship experiences at www.52GodlyWomen.com.

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Subscribe so you never miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!


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Living Books and Lifeschooling – Michelle Miller Howard

Living books and lifeschoolingToday we are talking to Michelle Miller Howard, author of TruthQuest History.

For over 20 years, Michelle has been a librarian, home-education consultant, author, columnist, and speaker, specializing in top-quality living books, educational vision, and history instruction.  It began in 1985, when she pioneered, funded, and acquired a library of such rare children’s literature, which has been thriving ever since; her Children’s Preservation Library (in Michigan) now houses over 20,000 valuable volumes, serving patrons in several counties.  A second library, Living Learning Libraries, is underway in Florida, with plans for additional libraries, and thousands more rare books already acquired.

Michelle is considered a national leader/expert on living books libraries and literature, and helps others around the nation found and operate such libraries as well. She has also developed a massive database on specialized youth literature.  She is a regular contributing columnist to various national magazines and educational websites, as well as a sought-after speaker and consultant.

Michelle wrote the multiple award-winning TruthQuest History curriculum, which steers families through American and world history with deep, engaging, spiritually-probing commentary, and which embeds her vast knowledge of topic-specific living book recommendations throughout.

Here is what I asked Michelle on this episode:

  • So, you and I have never met personally, but we’ve interacted online as part of Rhea Perry’s Educating for Success group. I love all the books you recommend and you have so much knowledge in this area! Have you always loved books? Tell us why good books are so foundational to education.
  • What are some of your favorite books and how did you incorporate them into your homeschooling?
  • Tell us more about your homeschooling journey and how did you come to write TruthQuest History?
  • Is there anything in particular that helped shape your educational philosophy?
  • The definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents primarily through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” Is there a part of that definition that particularly speaks to you and share with us a bit more about how your family lifeschooled?
  • How did homeschooling strengthen your relationships with your children?
  • How did you fit homeschooling with your family’s unique situation and responsibilities?
  • Was your family ever tempted to quit homeschooling and how did you navigate through that time?
  • What are some of the gifts that you saw in your children and how did you tailor their education around the development of those gifts?

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Be sure to subscribe to the podcast so you don’t miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!


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Cancer and Lifeschooling – Barbara McCoskey

Cancer and Lifeschooling - Barbara McCoskeyRecently I had the lovely opportunity to combine our kids’ movie planning meeting along with a podcast recording session with my dear friend and cancer survivor, Barbara McCoskey! What fun lifeschooling as we all worked together on our projects (and the little kids played in the pool as we watched from the window)!

Barbara and I talked about field trips to the end of the driveway (yes…you’ll hear what that was all about) and lessons on T-helper cells, among other things. Barbara’s cancer journey eight years ago gave their family a wonderful opportunity to lifeschool! Listen to hear how.

Barbara McCoskey treasures being married to Todd for over 17 years. They have four children, two before her 2010 cancer diagnosis and two adopted after her cancer treatments ended. She and her family are featured in the documentary, the 5-Day Adoption, a movie demonstrating absolute faith and the power of God in answering prayer, released in 2016. She is also the author of Dear God, Please Heal Mommy’s Cancer: One Family’s Journey through the Eyes of a Child and is currently working on her second book, I Will Not Die, but Live. 

Barbara has a passion to encourage others to embrace God’s calling on their lives and to persevere through life’s challenges and started CreatedToProclaim.com to share that passion. She and her family live in Charlotte, NC, where they have been lifeschooling for over 15 years.

Here is what I ask Barbara on this episode:

  • Tell us about your lifeschooling journey.
  • To remind our listeners, the definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” Is there a part of that definition that particularly speaks to you and share with us a bit more about how your family lifeschool?
  • I sometimes ask my guests if they have ever been tempted to quit homeschooling. It would certainly be understandable for you to struggle during this time when you had cancer. Were you tempted to quit?
  • What are some of the gifts that you have seen early on in your children and how have you tailored their education around the development of those gifts? Were you able to do this through your cancer journey?
  • Tell us a bit about your books and let our listeners know where they can find a copy.

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Hope you’ll join us next time!

The Best Option: Homeschooling – Sam Sorbo

The Best Option: Homeschooling - Sam SorboAt the recent International Christian Film Festival in Orlando, FL, I sat down with actor and model Sam Sorbo, whose book on homeschooling, They’re YOUR Kids: An inspirational Journey from Self-Doubter to Home School Advocate, has had a positive influence in encouraging moms that not only can they homeschool, but that it is, in fact, the best option when it comes to education. Not afraid of offending if she must, Sam Sorbo tells it like it is. You will be encouraged by her boldness in sharing the truth about education and homeschooling!

Sam Sorbo is known for her quick wit, fun personality, voracious work ethic, and strong commitment to principle. She holds many titles including radio host, actress, international model, activist, author, wife, mother, and home schooling advocate.

Sam’s new book, They’re YOUR Kids: An inspirational Journey from Self-Doubter to Home School Advocate, recently released to rave reviews. Of course, the Sorbos home school their three children.

Sam and Kevin released a movie around Christmas, 2017, written by Dan Gordon and Sam Sorbo, and Directed by Kevin Sorbo. The film, “Let There Be Light,” stars Kevin and Sam with their two boys, Braeden and Shane, and features Dionne Warwick, Michale Franzese, Travis Tritt, Daniel Roebuck, Gary Grubbs, and Donielle Artese. Executive Producer Sean Hannity also plays himself in the movie. (Bio taken in part from https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-sam-sorbo-show-affirming-feminine-convictions/id1140303542?mt=2.)

Here is what I asked Sam during our interview:

(Note: The surrounding crowd was a little noisy, but it gets quieter after about 10 minutes into the podcast.)

  • So, I’m sure most of our listeners are really curious about how you ended up homeschooling and how you came to believe it is the best option. Why don’t you share a bit of your story with us.
  • Relationship is a foundational principle in lifeschooling and is one of the main reasons why the pioneer homeschoolers started this movement…to build relationships with their children. I know that was a big part of your decision to homeschool. How has homeschooling strengthened your relationships with your children? What changes did you see?
  • Many homeschoolers bring the school model home because we all tend to just do what we know. What experiences shaped and influenced your educational philosophy?
  • Given that both you and your husband are actors, how has travel fit into your children’s educational experiences? Do you study and integrate subjects related to places you visit?
  • To remind our listeners, the definition of lifeschooling is “the individualized process of discovering your child’s God-given gifts and talents primarily through real life experiences that happen within the context of your family’s unique situations and missions.” Is there a part of that definition that particularly speaks to you and can you share with us a bit more about how your family lifeschools?
  • Tell us your biggest struggle in homeschooling and have you ever been tempted to quit, despite believing it is the best option?
  • What are some of the gifts that you have seen early on in your children (I know they are currently pursuing acting) and how have you tailored their education around the development of those gifts?
  • A thought struck me as I was reading a section in your book where you talk about preschool and how distraught many children are. My heart really broke for the little girl in your son’s preschool that you described as crying every single day and I thought, doesn’t the Bible say to “do to others as you would have them do to you”? If we really put ourselves into the shoes of our little child who is experiencing something that truly feels traumatic to her, then I don’t think we would do something that really is not necessary. Why do you think parents do this, especially with young children? Are they just not seeing things from the child’s perspective or are they just so conditioned to think that it IS the best option?
  • I am so thankful for someone like you who already has such a prominent platform writing a book advocating homeschooling and showing parents that they can do this. Tell us a bit about your book and let our listeners know where they can find a copy.

You can check out Sam’s site at www.SamSorbo.com and follow her on Facebook, and Instagram.

And that’s Life as a Lifeschooler! Subscribe to our podcast so you never miss an episode. Hope you’ll join us next time!