Chickweed Uses and Benefits

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses chickweed uses and benefits!

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses chickweed uses and benefits. Find out how this common plant has been used for centuries to help with many health issues.

Some Facts About Chickweed

History

Not much is written about Stellaria media, or chickweed. We know it originated in Europe because archeologists found it in pre-Neolithic dig sites in Great Britain. The ancient Greeks also wrote about it and it was commonly eaten in Ireland. From Europe, it spread throughout the world, including North America, where it’s mentioned a few times in Native American tales. Listen to the podcast to hear some interesting beliefs about chickweed from ancient times.

What does it look like?

Well, first of all, chickweed is very common all over yards and fields across Europe and North America. It seems to like cooler, temperate climates and you can find it at most times of the year. It is a low-growing, weedy plant with small white flowers in a star-like formation around the tiny center. The long pinkish stems can grow up to eighteen inches long and have a line of fine hairs along them. The small, pointed, oval-shaped leaves grow in pairs along the stem. It’s rather non-descript appearance gets confused with other plants sometimes.

But, chickweed has no milky sap. If you’re not sure if it’s chickweed, try pulling the stem apart. It not only lacks sap, but the inner stem is rather elastic. These features should help you distinguish chickweed from other similar looking plants. Don’t forget that it also has a line of hairs along the stem, too. Another interesting feature of chickweed is that it undergoes the “sleep of plants” each night. That is, it folds up its leaves over the tender buds and new shoots.

Chickweed Uses and Benefits

Like many other weedy plants, chickweed makes a great salad green. It’s also a favorite among foraging animals. However, it spoils easily, so always eat it fresh. Eating chickweed in salads can give you a boost of the following nutrients: Ascorbic-acid, Beta-carotene, Calcium, GLA (Gamma-linolenic-acid), Flavonoids, Magnesium, Niacin, Potassium, Riboflavin, Selenium, Thiamine, and Zinc. And even though, spinach is the most mineral rich green in grocery stores, chickweed boasts 12 times more calcium, 5 times more magnesium, 83 times more iron, and 6 times more vitamin C! But, you’ll never see chickweed in grocery stores. It wouldn’t survive the transit. And besides, you can probably find plenty of it in your backyard!

Chickweed has many uses and benefits. Traditionally, chickweed uses and benefits have mostly been associated with skin afflictions like acne, eczema, psoriasis, rashes, minor burns, boils, cuts, insect bites, and even splinters. It’s also good as a compress for soothing hemorrhoids and varicose veins. But, it’s steroidal saponin content – compounds that foam when water is present—accounts for its use in other applications. It acts like a type of soap and increases the permeability of many membranes in the body through partially dissolving them. That’s why it’s been used for digestive and intestinal support and to relieve inflammation. This helps us understand chickweed’s traditional uses in dissolving congested tissue including cysts, tumors, swollen glands, and thickened mucus membranes.  Because of this, chickweed also increases our ability to absorb nutrients across our intestines. Listen to the podcast to hear how saponins add to chickweed uses and benefits.

This herb has traditionally been prepared as a tea or salve. It can be eaten in salads every day if you wish, as long as you aren’t allergic.

Warning

Generally considered safe. Be careful of possible allergies, although this is uncommon.

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Best Homeschool Scheduling Advice

best homeschool scheduling | The Best homeschool scheduling advice I ever received actually came from my daughter, do not duplicate the school at home. I looked at the way I scheduled my homeschool year. #homeschool #homeschooling #podcast #homeschoolscheduleBest Homeschool Scheduling Advice Episode 285

The Best homeschool scheduling advice I ever received actually came from my daughter. She said, “Mom if we are going to duplicate the school system then why homeschool?” With that in mind, I looked at the way I scheduled my homeschool year. I made time for those special events that make homeschooling stand out from the conventional school cuWhetherum. Whether it is a field trip, a family trip that is planned or one-to-one mentoring with a talented person. In this episode of Vintage Homeschool Moms, I’ll explain the best homeschool scheduling advice, ever!

Thanks to our sponsor – The Well Planned Gal!! 

Questions to ask yourself before you begin scheduling!

  1. What are your state laws — are you compliant?
  2. Are you part of a support group? This network IS part of your support!
  3. What are your goals and objectives for the year?
  4.  What method of homeschooling do you lean toward? If you don’t know listen to this podcast on the topic HERE PUT LINK
  5. How long are you planning to homeschool? 4, 5, or 6 hours or more per day? Check out your homeschool laws here if you don’t already know them: https://hslda.org/content/laws/
  6. Are you flexible?
  7. Do you like check off lists? For you? For the kids?

These questions will set the groundwork for how you’d like to set up your homeschool year. What I might consider best homeschool scheduling advice may not allign with your homeschool philosophy. However I hope you can take what you need and make it work for you! With this clearly in mind, here is some of the best advice I can share with you about homeschool schedules and ways to have a stress-free year.

Best Homeschool Scheduling Tips:

  1. Keep your eyes focused on your family needs. What Sally Jo uses for her kids may not work for yours.
  2. Look at your goals. What do you hope to accomplish this year? What subjects do you want to cover this year?
  3. Is it important to develop your child’s creativity and imagination and encourage them to think?
  4. What character qualities do you want to work on? If you want to strengthen family relationships, select reading materials or read aloud the books that will do just that. Read the Little House on the Prarie (younger) or Anne of Green Gables (older).
  5. Each child is unique, consider your child’s needs.
  6. Never recreate the public/private classroom at home.
  7. Don’t forget about you. Do you have help scheduled, whether that is a chore chart so everyone can pitch in, or a park day so you can visit with friends.
  8. Never – and that means never answer the phone while you are homeschooling. Set special ring tones for important people – others go to voice mail. This goes for checking Facebook or social media in general.
  9. Never and that means never -unless it is absolutely impossible go on an errand during school time. No grocery store shopping, doctor appointments – until after school or on a day off if you take one, etc.

Best Homeschool Scheduling Advice — Ever! 

Tools & Supplies:

  1. Three Inch Binder: Use a three-ring binder. I began a master homeschool binder when I first began homeschooling and it contains ALL the must haves… First, copies of their schedules, important information: everything from blanks I could duplicate to things I always had to look up previously. I have the children’s evaluations in this binder from the beginning of our homeschooling in Kindergarten through twelfth grade! I also keep a copy of their evaluations in their grade/year notebook.
  2. Master Lists: Subjects, books, reading books, grade level goals, etc. I think through this once, add to it if a particular child needs more information and then file it in my book. I also have a file in a Word Doc. in my computer that corresponds. Master lists can include a supply list for school, birthdays, and a calendar of events.
  3. File cabinet. Throughout the years I kept files on each of the kids and work. As we ended a year, the binder was emptied, the information for the year filed under the child’s name (and grade labeled), and the binder was then ready for the next year.
  4. School Supplies: Notebooks: Look for sales. We get lined, spiral notebooks for less than 20 cents during back to school sales. I buy enough for all year. Use a sharpie (or a nice label from the computer) to label the subject. Notebook paper: This is one of those things we always ran out of when the children were younger. Wide-ruled notebook paper for the little kids and college ruled for older ones. Pencils: We prefer the #2 pencils and some of the kids liked the mechanical pencils, but there was one brand, in particular, they liked best that we could only purchase at an office supply store. Yes, friends, this was “pre-Amazon” days! Of course, depending on your child’s needs there are crayons, markers, erasers (the ones that fit on the pencil and the bigger ones), colored pencils, pens and sharpie and highlighters. Don’t forget the 110 lb paper to make your own dividers.
  5. Best Purchases: Large Dry Erase Boards and erasable markers, an electric three-hole punch, a laminator, laminating sheets, a stapler, a heavy duty stapler (to make those books kids love to make), and a heavy duty tape dispenser. I loved sticky notes and tabs to create my own dividers with 110 lb paper.

Best Homeschool Scheduling Advice:

  1. Know Your Kids: Do you know or have you evaluated your children? Our sponsor has these wonderful books for Placement and Evaluation.
  2. Organized: Get your books organized. Half the battle if finding the books you need when you need them. School supplies and additional resources. Everything has a place!
  3. Freebies: There are lots of sites that say you can get free curriculum, downloads, printables, etc. If you have these – organize them!
  4. Scope and Sequence: This states what your kids need to know and as homeschoolers you can be flexible. Here is a scope and sequence from Abeka as well as Bob Jones that goes from K-12. I’m not endorsing this one way or the other, you have to make your own determination.
  5. Flexibility: Build flexibility into your schedule – how can you do this? (Listen to the podcast for tips)
  6. Input: Get input from your older children. One year my kids wanted to study oceanography and space. Talk about diverse! Yet those became their favorite subjects.
  7. Routine or Schedule? What works for you a routine or schedule? The best homeschool scheduling takes into mind your lifestyle and only you can decide if you want to do things daily with a set schedule or perhaps have a routine that includes daily activities but more loosely scheduled.
  8. Rotate your schedule – doing the same thing all the time can be boring and cause kids to zone out. Maybe you do math every day, but what about history or science? You can do history two times a week and science two times for 6 weeks, and then change it to history three times and science two.
  9. 180 Homeschool Days: Get a year’s calendar and circle the days you will school each month. Yes, this can change but it is nice to have it set out before you – so you can plan. 180 days of homeschooling is what my state requires. Check your state information here: https://hslda.org/content/laws/
  10. Homeschool Planner: Well Planned Gal planners are my favorite – there are digital, printed and even a prayer planner.  There is also a smaller size to keep in your purse or backpack!
  11. Use Checklists: Checklist with pictures for little kids and a checklist for you. It is an easy way to keep records.
  12. Breaks: Be sure to highlight birthday’s, events, holidays, and field trips. Do you have a catch-up/ planning day? If you can’t have one every week, try for one a month.
  13. Field Trips: Be sure to use the resources available to homeschool families in your area.
  14. Plan your week: Look at your books and divide the number of homeschool days or weeks by chapters. If there are 30 chapters you may need to do one per week. Etc. Some books you can take two weeks to complete one chapter.
  15. Teach Kids Together: Group ages and books/subjects as much as possible. Kids like working together or if they are competitive use it to their advantage.
  16. Projects: Plan early. Science fair ideas begin in the summer, papers signed as soon as school starts (grades six and up). I wrote the book, “An Insider’s Guide to Successful Science Fair Projects available on Media Angels Membership or Amazon here.
  17. High School: Planning for high school? Plan a 4-year schedule of required subjects for graduation. The scale is different for a high school diploma vs. a high school diploma with college in mind. Also if your kids are planning to attend college listen to College Prep Genius for ways to ace the SAT and ACT as well as get scholarships. If your kids play sports – know the rules. If your kids are approaching high school and have an eye to playing sports in college read up on the NCAA.org eligibility information about classes that count for high school for college play.

Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor – Well Planned Gal

Rebecca from the Well Planned Gal understands the challenges of working within a budget, managing multiple children, and trying to keep up with a variety of information. That is why she created popular planner bundles!

Combine organizational tools with year long encouragement by bundling Well Planned Day planners with the popular Family Magazine. For a limited time, Save 30% with one of her  popular planner bundles. Each bundle contains 2 planner products with a one-year subscription to Family Magazine.  

Click Here to Go to Well Planned Gal

Special Replay: 5 Secret Revealed – SAT and ACT

5 Secrets Revealed SAT ACTSpecial Replay:  5 Insider’s Top Secret Tips About the SAT and ACT

College Prep – #56 with Jean Burke

Are you ready for a series of podcasts that crack wide open the SAT and ACT myth. No, these tests do not evaluate what you know, they are standardized LOGIC tests. Do you understand what to look for? Can you answer some sections in less then one minute a question? In this series, podcast 56, 57, 58 and 59 Jean shares the information you need to crack open the code and score well. This information is something the test makers do not want you to know!

Visit our sponsor – College Prep Genius

Show Notes: 5 Secrets Revealed SAT – ACT

  1. Redesigned SAT is designed by ACT writers

One third rule – did better on ACT one better to SAT and one third do equally well on both.

The difference in the tests have been changed.

Some students didn’t like to sit longer – or on some tests they couldn’t switch their brain fast enough or found it more difficult

SAT changing began with – David Colman – he was the architect of common core – he was put in charge of testing and he decided he didn’t like the fact that more student s were taking the ACT over the SAT – the difference was close approx. 1.8 million vs. 1..7 million

David Colman hired the best ACT writer’s to improve the SAT and they did – they set up– patterns similar on both tests almost 99 percent the same

4-long sections on both test – students of any age common strategies now – on both tests

12 states including Texas – pulled out of Common Core – private and homeschoolers have not adopted CC – college board isn’t going to get sued…

influences and philosophies – testing reading, writing and math …. More on the podcast.

  1. There is now an August SAT – rising Junior – extra practice before PSAT before it counts for national merit scholar –26

College board – profile – links –College Board

CollegePrepGenius.com/SATdates

CollegePrepGenius.com/SATScores

 

  1. SAT – costs six figures to write – that alone tells you that when the college board writes this test – they have to follow the same rules all the time. Once you learn the patterns you can study those.

Change had to do with money – they wanted more people to take the SAT –

XYZ company got sued by college board – this particular company got caught cheating had the real tests and used those tests to teach their students

This is a beatable test – learning the patterns is the key –– cost to write each SAT – 625K for one test…

 

  1. SAT and ACT makers use similar misleading remarks – it is so discouraging and wrong advice… these tests do use high school content – these are filled with logic, and reasoning… but that alone is not enough. You have to approach it with a critical eye.

You can not study for the content –but you can study for how the questions are written. The only fair way to compare is with a standardized tests…

CollegePrepGenius.com/actcontent

CollegePrepGenius.com/Satcontent

 

  1. You can get your SAT and ACT detailed scores back – you can determine your weaknesses and how to combat these

There are 3 times a year you can get your test back for a small fee – clean test booklet…

CollegeBoard.org

Gives you very specific results –

ACT – CollegePrepGenius.com/acttir

SAT – CollegePrepGenius.com/satqas

Special Replay: Best Last Minute Summer DIY Tips

Best Last Minute Summer | What are the best last minute summer DIY Tips? In this episode of Vintage Homeschool MomsThe Absolute BEST Last Minute Summer DIY Tips with Felice Gerwitz

What are the best last minute summer DIY Tips? In this episode of Vintage Homeschool Moms, Felice Gerwitz shares her passion for all things DIY and some quick gift ideas to make for the holidays that are just around the corner. Use recyclables you have on hand or with a minimum of cost, create beautiful items you will treasure. The best thing? The kids can help!

Visit our podcast sponsor! Get all these books from our Media Angels Membership website.

 

Show Notes: The Best Last Minute Summer DIY Tips

  1. Get Organized.
    • Now is the time to just relax – for me that means doing something creative. If you or your children love to create crafts for gifts make a list of some people on your list.
    • Look around the house. From the podcast I created on getting organized fast here,  you may have things you were going to throw away that you can recycle. What about an old frame, some mason jars or a plastic bin that can be recovered or painted?
    • Trash day. My kids use to ride bikes up and down the road to see what neighbors were throwing away and sometimes came home with treasures. The awesome wrought iron and wood bench (my son refinished with new wood) that sits in front of my pond is one of those treasures. Look around on trash day.
  2. Gift Making
    • Useful items. Picture frames with a treasured memory, hand painted to match any decor specifically for a family member.
    • Tool holders: kitchen utensils, pencils, crayons, etc.
    • Shelves. Floating shelves are all the rage. Ask dad, mom, grandpa or even grandma (not me–but some of my friends are really handy!) to help. Here are some directions on how to make floating shelves.
    • Mixes. A great help for when you begin homeschooling again. Make muffin mixes, sour dough, cookie mix, biscuit mix from healthy alternatives. Use organic ingredients, make them vegan or gluten free. There are many great recipes.
    • Painted pots. Hanging pots with an inexpensive fern or recycled wood look great.
  3. The Best DIY Ideas For Families
    • Gift Cards. My favorite ideas revolve around hand rubs, neck rubs, car washes, etc. When kids were younger it was “watch the baby” for 30 minutes, etc. Give in a homemade envelope or box.
    • Create Job Calendar: These involve paper and clothes pin. Listen to the podcast for specific directions.
    • Meal Schedule
    • Vacation planning
    • Pizza night
    • Last minute getaways or field trip ideas

 

Special Replay: Caution – Career Path Ahead

caution career choice aheadSpecial Replay:  After High School-Caution, Career Path Ahead with Jean Burke

Podcast #49

It’s time to think about college and now is the time to think about the different career paths. While there are many different paths, the main ones will be covered in this podcast with Jean Burk – “Caution – Career Path Ahead.”

Visit today’s sponsor – College Prep Genius

CPG Logo

Three main career paths after high school are discussed in this podcast on selecting a career path and planning.

  1. College
    • Internships – opportunities before high school
    • Costs can vary a few thousand to several hundred thousand for four years
    • Basic degree- BA in Business you should take on another degree.
    • Two Year Degree –Jr. College
    • Different types of jobs requiring 4-Year Degrees
    • Different types of jobs requiring a Master’s Degrees
  2.  Workforce: Vocational Degrees
    • Costs approx.: – $1 to 12-15K
    • After high school may have a job lined up.
  3.  Military: Different branches in the armed forces
    • GI Bill – pay college
    • Officers – for law or medical
    • Top Military school – West Point or Annapolis
    • Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines
    • Enter ROTC program in college

FisherHouse.org | Feea.org/programs/scholarships

Special Replay: Homeopathy for Bugs, Bites and Stings – Part 2

Tune in as Sue Meyer talks about homeopathic remedies to use to protect insects and what to do if you get stung in this podcast.Special replay time of this favorite episode series on bugs, bites and stings, it’s a two part series and it’s FREE!  Enjoy part 2 of this summer-time series!  Sue gives remedies for bites from Mosquitoes, Certain Flies, Fleas, Bedbugs, Gnats, Midges, Spiders, Ticks, and Chiggers … all are a concern this time of year as we get outdoors and enjoy the warm weather after a long winter.  All these insects have the chance of carrying diseases that can be transmitted to humans or animals.  Tune in as Sue Meyer talks about homeopathic remedies to use to protect ourselves and our families from these insects and what to do if you get stung in this two-part series.

Click Here to get the FREE Handout to go with this two part series!

 

Visit our website at:  http://homeopathyformommies.com

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer:

This audio is for educational purposes and is not intended in any way to be a replacement for, or as a substitute to qualified medical advice. If you think you are suffering from a medical condition consult your doctor or other qualified persons.

The content of the Homeopathy for Mommies Radio post or page, including text, graphics, images, or information contained in text or audio, or other content, is offered on an informational basis only. No content is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should always seek the advice and guidance of a qualified health professional before changing or making any adjustment to any medication or treatment protocol you are currently using.

Stopping any medication or treatment protocol you are currently using.
Starting any new medication or treatment protocol, whether or not it was discussed on the Homeopathy For Mommies Radio show, page or post on this website.
Information on this site is informational and not as specifically applicable to any individual’s medical problem(s), concerns and/or needs.
These products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to treat or prevent disease.
In each audio remedies are recommended. We are not claiming that the product will cure any of these problems or disorders. We are merely reporting that people have used the product to aid these conditions.

Special Summer Replay: Homeopathy for Bugs, Bites and Stings – Part 1

How to prevent and treat Bug Bites and Stings with homeopathySpecial Replay from Homeopathy for Mommies for all the moms out there who have been emailing me about those pesky bug bites!  Bites, Stings, and all the things that come with summer fun … let’s get a refresher on how homeopathy can help!  Here’s part 2 of this series too – in case you missed it.

It’s summertime and now is the time when all those creepy crawly things come out! Mosquitoes, Certain Flies, Fleas, Bedbugs, Gnats, Midges, Spiders, Ticks, and Chiggers … all are a concern this time of year as we get outdoors and enjoy the warm weather after a long winter.  All these insects have the chance of carrying diseases that can be transmitted to humans or animals.  Tune in as Sue Meyer talks about homeopathic remedies to use to protect ourselves and our families from these insects and what to do if you get stung in this two-part series.

Click Here to get the FREE Handout to go with this two part series!



Disclaimer:

This audio is for educational purposes and is not intended in any way to be a replacement for, or as a substitute to qualified medical advice. If you think you are suffering from a medical condition consult your doctor or other qualified persons.

The content of the Homeopathy for Mommies Radio post or page, including text, graphics, images, or information contained in text or audio, or other content, is offered on an informational basis only. No content is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should always seek the advice and guidance of a qualified health professional before changing or making any adjustment to any medication or treatment protocol you are currently using.

  • Stopping any medication or treatment protocol you are currently using.
  • Starting any new medication or treatment protocol, whether or not it was discussed on the Homeopathy For Mommies Radio show, page or post on this website.
  • Information on this site is informational and not as specifically applicable to any individual’s medical problem(s), concerns and/or needs.
  • These products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to treat or prevent disease.

In each audio remedies are recommended. We are not claiming that the product will cure any of these problems or disorders. We are merely reporting that people have used the product to aid these conditions.


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


Special Replay – Let’s Talk About Teaching History

History

History is about a bunch of dead people and stuff that happened long ago or so I thought when I was a kid. As a homeschool parent, I found that history is actually “HIS” story and when it is revealed we find so many wonderful lessons to learn. In this session, you’ll hear some of the ways that both Meredith & Felice have taught history to their children from the zany to the classes Felice asked her brother-in-law to teach to homeschool kids!

Meredith and Felice discuss their favorite resources – here is a list of their combined books, below the audio player.

American History Online Course 

World History Reading List  – All rights reserved Media Angels, Inc. 2014

September History Reading Books

  1. In the Days of Noah by Gloria Clanin
  2. Life in the Great Ice Age by Michael and Beverly Oard
  3. The Mystery of the Ark by Paul Thomsen
  4. The Lost Kingdom (Reg Danson Adventure #2) by Clint Kelly
  5. Adam and His Kin: The Lost History of Their Lives and Times by Ruth Beechick
  6. Genesis: Finding Our Roots by Ruth Beechick
  7. Dinosaurs in God’s World Long Ago by Henrietta Gambill
  8. What Really Happened to the Dinosaurs? (DJ and Tracker John) by John Morris and Ken Ham
  9. Priceless Jewel at the Well: The Diary of Rebekah’s Nursemaid, Canaan, 1986-1985 B.C. (Promised Land Diaries)
  10. The Magic School Bus Shows and Tells: A Book About Archaeology by Jackie Posner
  11. Exploring Ancient Cities of the Bible by Michael and Caroline Carroll

October Reading Books

  1. Tutankhamun by Robert Green
  2. Tirzah by Lucille Travis
  3. Mummies, Tombs, and Treasure: Secrets of Ancient Egypt by Lila Perl
  4. Miriam’s Cup, a Passover Story by Fran Manushkin
  5. Learning About Passover by Barbara Soloff Levy
  6. Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton
  7. Adventures in Ancient Egypt by Linda Bailey
  8. The Golden Goblet by Eloise Jarvis McGraw
  9. The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt by Elizabeth Payne
  10. The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone: Key to Ancient Egypt by James Giblin
  11. Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw
  12. Mummies Made in Egypt by Aliki
  13. Kids Discover: Ancient Egypt
  14. The Peaceful Warrior: The Diary of Deborahs Armor Bearer, Israel, 1200 B.C. (Promised Land Diaries)
  15. Hittite Warrior by Joanne Williamson
  16. Journey for Tobiyah by Barbara Morgan
  17. King Solomon’s Navy by Nora Benjamin Kubie
  18. The Temple at Jerusalem by Jacqueline Morley

November Reading Books

  1. The Usborne Story of Music by Simon Mundy
  2. The Usborne Story of Painting by Anthea Peppin
  3. The Usborne Book of Living Long Ago: Everyday life through the Ages, by Felicity Brooks and Helen Edom
  4. God-King: A Story in the Days of King Hezekiah by Joanne Williamson
  5. Aesop’s Fables for Children
  6. Hour of the Olympics (Magic Tree House #16) by Mary Pope Osborne
  7. The Seven Voyages of Sinbad (and Other Tales from the Arabian Nights) retold by Gladys Davidson
  8. King Solomon’s Mines (Puffin Classics) by H Rider Haggard

December Reading Books

  1. The Odyssey for Boys and Girls by AJ Church
  2. Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  3. Famous Men of Greece by John Haaren and AB Poland
  4. The Librarian Who Measured the Earth by Kathryn Lasky
  5. Usborne: The Greeks by Susan Peach & Anne Millard
  6. Adventures in Ancient Greece by Linda Bailey
  7. Cyrus the Persian by Sherman A Nagel
  8. Shadow Spinner by Susan Fletcher
  9. Within the Palace Gates: The King’s Cupbearer by Anna P. Siviter
  10. The Greek and Roman Eras: (Journey Through History) by Carme Peris and Gloria & Oriol Verges
  11. Hand Me Another Brick by Charles Swindoll
  12. Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights

January Reading Books

  1. Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile, Egypt, 57 B.C. (The Royal Diaries) by Kristiana Gregory
  2. About the History of the Calendar by AE Evenson
  3. Battle of Actium (Great Battles Through the Ages) by David Califf
  4. The Runaway by Patricia St. John
  5. Fountain of Life by Rebecca Martin
  6. Adventures in Ancient China by Linda Bailey
  7. A Grain of Rice by Helena Clare Pittman
  8. Archimedes and the Door of Science by Jeanne Bendick
  9. The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare
  10. Ben-Hur by Lew Wallace
  11. Titus: A Comrade of the Cross by Florence Morse Kingsley
  12. Augustus Caesar’s World by Genevieve Foster
  13. Famous Men of Rome by John Haaren & A.B. Poland
  14. Rome and Romans (Usborne Time Traveler) by Heather Amery and Patricia Vanags
  15. I and II Maccabees from the Apocrypha (available in Bibles that include the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical books)
  16. Life Stories Of Men Who Shaped History, From Plutarch’s Lives
  17. Pompeii…Buried Alive! by Edith Kunhardt
  18. The Robe by Lloyd C Douglas
  19. Masada by Tim McNeese (Sieges That Changed the World)

February Reading Books

  1. Devil’s Island by John Hagee
  2. Outcast by Rosemary Sutcliff[
  3. See You Later, Gladiator (Time Warp Trio) by Jon Scieszka
  4. Detectives in Togas by Henry Winterfeld
  5. The Eagle (previously published as The Eagle of the Ninth) by Rosemary Sutcliff
  6. The Story of Valentine by Wilma Pitchford Hays
  7. Augustine, the Farmer’s Boy of Tagaste by P. De Zeeuw
  8. The City of God by Augustine
  9. Ancient Rome: How It Affects You Today by Richard J. Maybury
  10. The Ides of April by Mary Ray
  11. Beyond the Desert Gate by Mary Ray
  12. Jesus Freaks: Martyrs by dc Talk
  13. Foxe’s Book Of Martyrs by John Foxe (many different editions of this work are available)
  14. Saint George and the Dragon retold by Margaret Hodges
  15. Saint Patrick: Pioneer Missionary to Ireland by Michael McHugh

March Reading Books

  1. Anna of Byzantium by Tracy Barrett
  2. Famous Men of the Middle Ages by Haaren and Poland
  3. Augustine Came to Kent by Barbara Willard
  4. Beowulf
  5. The Shining Company by Rosemary Sutcliff
  6. Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People
  7. The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck
  8. Against the World: The Odyssey of Athanasius by Henry W. Coray
  9. Saladin: Noble Prince of Islam by Diane Stanley
  10. The Story of Rolf and the Viking Bow by Allen French
  11. Le Morte D’Arthur by Sir Thomas Mallory
  12. The Sword in the Tree by Clyde Robert Bulla
  13. The Book of Pastoral Rule (also published as Pastoral Care) by St. Gregory the Great
  14. The Song of Roland (an epic poem)
  15. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain
  16. Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle
  17. Idylls of the King by Alfred Lord Tennyson
  18. Camelot by AJ Lerner (script for the Broadway play)
  19. Viking Raiders (Usborne Time Traveler) by Civardi, Graham-Campbell, & Wingate

April Reading Books

  1. Famous Men of the Middle Ages by Haaren and Poland
  2. Son of Charlemagne by Barbara Willard
  3. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
  4. A Chaucer Reader edited by Charles W. Dunn
  5. Leif Eriksson: First Voyager to America by Katherine B. Shippen
  6. In His Name by Edward E Hale
  7. Paula the Waldensian by Eva Lecomte
  8. Lost Baron: A Story of England in the Year 1200 by Allen French
  9. Macbeth by Shakespeare
  10. Hamlet by Shakespeare
  11. El Cid, retold by Geraldine McCaughrean
  12. Don Quixote (also published as Don Quijote) by Cervantes
  13. A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver by E. L. Konigsburg
  14. The Hidden Treasure of Glaston by Eleanore M. Jewett
  15. Castle by David Macaulay
  16. Cathedral by David Macaulay
  17. The Door in the Wall by Marguerite De Angeli
  18. The Midwife’s Apprentice by Karen Cushman
  19. Knights and Castles (Usborne Time Traveler) by Judy Hindley
  20. The Striped Ships by Eloise McGraw ***
  21. The Third Crusade: Richard the Lionhearted vs Saladin (Great Battles Through the Ages) by Samuel Willard Crompton
  22. The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle (who also drew original illustrations for this book)[
  23. The King’s Shadow by Elizabeth Alder

May Reading Books

  1. Men of Iron by Howard Pyle
  2. If All the Swords in England: A Story of Thomas Becket by Barbara Willard
  3. Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott
  4. Genghis Khan and the Mongol Horde by Harold Lamb
  5. A Morbid Taste for Bones (Brother Cadfael Chronicles–we recommend this series) by Ellis Peters)
  6. Adam of the Road by Elizabeth Janet Gray
  7. The Dragon and the Raven (The Days of King Alfred) by G. A. Henty
  8. The Magna Charta by James Daugherty
  9. The Inferno of Dante: A New Verse Translation by Robert Pinsky
  10. The Life and Words of St. Francis of Assisi by Ira Peck
  11. In Freedom’s Cause: A Story of Wallace and Bruce by G. A. Henty
  12. The Beggars’ Bible by Louise Vernon
  13. Ink on His Fingers by Louise A. Vernon
  14. Morning Star of the Reformation by Andy Thomson
  15. Henry V by Shakespeare
  16. Joan of Arc by Mark Twain
  17. The Pied Piper of Hamlin by Robert Browning
  18. The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric Kelly
  19. Constantinople (Sieges That Changed the World) by Tim McNeese[/easyazon_link]
    [easyazon_link asin=”0374457433″ locale=”US” new_window=”default” nofollow=”default” tag=”ultihomeradin-20″ add_to_cart=”default” cloaking=”default” localization=”default” popups=”default”]A Parcel of Patterns by Jill Paton Walsh[/easyazon_link]
    [easyazon_link asin=”0375802320″ locale=”US” new_window=”default” nofollow=”default” tag=”ultihomeradin-20″ add_to_cart=”default” cloaking=”default” localization=”default” popups=”default”]Joan of Arc by Nancy Wilson Ross[/easyazon_link]
    [easyazon_link asin=”0891076026″ locale=”US” new_window=”default” nofollow=”default” tag=”ultihomeradin-20″ add_to_cart=”default” cloaking=”default” localization=”default” popups=”default”]The Hawk and the Dove by Penelope Wilcock[/easyazon_link]

Best Of HomeschoolCPA: Can We Collect Money Now That’s For Next Year?

Can My Homeschool Group Collect Money Now That's For Next Year?Can My Homeschool Group Collect Money Now That’s For Next Year?

Many homeschool groups collect deposits in the spring for next fall’s programs. This helps with determining how many families will be returning. But how should these early deposits be recorded in a homeschool group’s bookkeeping. Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA offers some ideas.

In the podcast Carol mentioned a handout that explains how to record early deposits in accounting software like QuickBooks. Here it is:

Deferred Revenue in QuickBooks (pdf)

Visit Carol’s website here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURED PRODUCT from HomeschoolCPA:

 

 

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group manage their money well? Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent? Do you know how to prevent fraud? This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Click Here to request more information!

 

 

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Special Replay: Caution – Career Path Ahead

caution career choice aheadSpecial Replay:  After High School – Caution, Career Path Ahead with Jean Burke

Podcast #49

It’s time to think about college and now is the time to think about the different career paths. While there are many different paths, the main ones will be covered in this podcast with Jean Burke – “Caution – Career Path Ahead.”

Visit today’s sponsor – College Prep Genius

CPG Logo

Three main career paths after high school are discussed in this podcast on selecting a career path and planning.

  1. College
    • Internships – opportunities before high school
    • Costs can vary a few thousand to several hundred thousand for four years
    • Basic degree- BA in Business you should take on another degree.
    • Two Year Degree –Jr. College
    • Different types of jobs requiring 4-Year Degrees
    • Different types of jobs requiring a Master’s Degrees
  2.  Workforce: Vocational Degrees
    • Costs approx.: – $1 to 12-15K
    • After high school may have a job lined up.
  3.  Military: Different branches in the armed forces
    • GI Bill – pay college
    • Officers – for law or medical
    • Top Military school – West Point or Annapolis
    • Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines
    • Enter ROTC program in college

FisherHouse.org | Feea.org/programs/scholarships