Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural remedies for sunburn. She talks about both protecting your skin and helping your skin heal.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural remedies for sunburn. She talks about both protecting your skin and helping your skin heal.

Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Conditioning the Skin

There are ways to prevent sunburn besides avoiding the sun. In fact, we shouldn’t avoid sunlight altogether since we need it so much for good health. However, we don’t want to burn the skin. Sunburn is linked to skin cancer and premature aging.  So, the best way to get enough sun without burning the skin is to spend only 20 minutes at a time out in bright sunlight. If you want to be able to spend more time in the sun, start with 20 minutes a day and gradually add more time each day.

It’s best if you start doing this in late spring. This gradual conditioning will help prevent burning as your skin gets used to more sun exposure. It will release more melanin, causing you to tan instead. If you are very light skinned, you might want to start with only 10 minutes a day and add 5 minutes daily starting in mid-spring. This can be a tedious process, but it will help you avoid sun burn and it gets you outside! It will not help you avoid pre-mature aging, though.

Get the free report for this episode for some ideas on how to pretreat skin to counter aging. You can also wear a wide brimmed hat and loose, thin, white clothing to both stay cool and cover your skin. In addition, stay indoors in the hottest hours of the day, usually 12pm-2pm. But, what are some natural remedies for sunburn when you stay a bit too long out there enjoying the summer sun?

Essential Oils That Are Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Lavender

Lavender essential oil is one of the most popular oils because it is so versatile and gentle. Most of the time we use it to help calm down and sleep. But, it’s also good for calming the skin and helping sunburn to heal. It can be used in dilution with children.

Moroccan Chamomile

Chamomile is another favorite with families because it, too, is gentle enough for children and also has a calming, healing effect. Just make sure you have the right chamomile. Not all of them work the same.

Geranium

Geranium essential oil has long been used in natural skincare formulas and helps rejuvenate skin and protect against aging. It nourishes, heals, and promotes healthy, radiant skin.

Everlasting

Helichrysum, or everlasting, oil is the premier oil for growing new skin. Adding it to a sunburn formula will help the skin heal faster and look younger.

Herbs/Plants

Aloe vera Gel

Everyone knows about aloe vera gel for burns. It cools and moisturizes the skin as it brings down inflammation. Best used immediately after burning and check the label for added ingredients. Sometimes, store bought aloe products include other ingredients.

Calendula Ointment with Carrot Seed Oil

Did you know that Calendula is the scientific name for marigolds? That means that you can make this ointment yourself at home without any special equipment. This combination works great for household burns, too. On the podcast, Julie tells a story of incredible healing using this formula.

St. John’s Wort Oil

Did you know that St. John’s Wort not only helps with emotional and mental health, but can also help with burns and viral infections as well?

Other Natural Remedies for Sunburn

On the podcast, Julie also talks about using cucumber, vitamin A and E, shea butter, coconut oil to help heal burned skin.

Get your short report, Natural Sunscreen and Sunburn Protection, by clicking HERE. Once you put in your email and get to the downloads page, just scroll down to episode 10 and grab your freebie.

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Natural Ways to Fight Inflammation

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural ways to fight inflammation that makes our noses, ears, and throats all itchy during allergy season.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural ways to fight inflammation that makes our noses, ears, and throats all itchy during allergy season.

Natural Ways to Fight Inflammation

A bit about histamines

Since the sneezing and itching associated with seasonal allergies are caused by histamines, this episode is about reducing histamines. When your body releases histamines, a chain reaction occurs. Histamine affects your heart and blood vessels, lungs, eyes and nose, and digestive system.   It also increases swelling and inflammation (which can cause headaches, sleep issues, and other problems) and causes an adrenaline rush. Normally, your immune system releases histamines in response to an invader to mobilize the body to get rid of it. In the case of seasonal allergies, the body sees the allergens as invaders. So, the body ends up chronically inflamed and revved up.

Eliminate or reduce foods high in histamines

Did you know that one of the natural ways to fight inflammation is to reduce your intake of foods containing histamines? On the podcast, Julie talks about these foods. To reduce the histamine load in your body, you will need try to eat less of these foods. In addition, it helps to eat more of the foods that fight inflammation, particularly those high in B vitamins and vitamin C. Julie talks about those, too, in the podcast.

Eliminate other inflammatory foods

Besides foods high in histamines, it also helps to reduce or eliminate foods that promote inflammation in your body. These foods work against your efforts to reduce seasonal allergies symptoms. In the podcast, Julie discusses these problematic foods, one of the biggest culprits being white sugar. If you want to use natural ways to fight inflammation, reducing sugar intake needs to be near the top of the list.

Is it histamine intolerance?

There is no known test for histamine intolerance, but it is a genetic condition. Doctors think that people with this condition produce low amounts of the enzymes that break down histamines. So, to prevent flare-ups, people who suffer with histamine intolerance need to eliminate high histamine foods from their diets. Check out the link below for more information on that.

Other natural ways to fight inflammation

Histamine release is not just associated with invaders or pseudo-invaders, like allergens. It is also associated with certain medications, such as antibiotics, and with stress. Reducing stress can help with lowering inflammation. Try some of the suggestions Julie makes on the podcast. Another way to reduce histamine levels is through increasing your Omega-3 fatty acid intake by eating more grass-fed butter, wild caught salmon, avocados, olive oil, and pastured chicken. It also helps to eat foods high in calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, B12, and iron. For some examples of these, listen to the podcast!

Don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

 

Fight Allergies Naturally with Herbs and Essential Oils

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses how to fight allergies naturally with herbs and essential oils.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses how to fight allergies naturally with herbs and essential oils.

Fight Allergies Naturally!

Before talking about herbs and essential oils, please remember that all information shared is for educational purposes only. This discussion about the historical and personal uses of herbs and essential oils does not constitute medical advice. Herbs and oils don’t cure anything. They simply provide the raw materials for your body to heal itself the way God intended it to do. So, if you choose to fight allergies naturally, keep this in mind.

Fight Allergies Naturally with Herbs

As mentioned in previous episodes, herbs and oils work best as part of a wholistic approach to wellness. Diet, habits, and herbs/oils work together to heal your body. In the podcast, Julie covers a few herbs and oils, but they aren’t the only ones that help! The ones discussed are safer and more readily available than some other plants.

A note about children: rarely do children under age 5 show signs of seasonal allergies unless they have severe allergies to other things as well. Julie’s sons showed seasonal allergy symptoms at age 4, but they also tested positive for more than fifteen total allergens. These other allergens included foods and animals. It is imperative that the food allergens are addressed even while using herbal remedies. The sooner, the better. Otherwise, they could face a lifetime of misery and eventually, autoimmune conditions as well!

Nettles

Nettles can be found all over the world and tends to live in wooded areas. The leaves are most often used even though they have stinging hairs all along the edges of them. If you trigger any of these hairs, you will develop the characteristic red, itchy, inflamed rash. In the podcast, Julie tells about the antidote to the venom and some unusual historical uses of this plant.

Nettles can be prepared as an extract or as an infusion. It is the most frequently used herb to fight allergies naturally because of its astringent and anti-asthmatic properties. It tends to dry up mucus and improve air flow. It is also widely available compared to some other herbs and in many places, can be wild-harvested or grown in your yard.

Horseradish

Yes, this is that pungent vegetable root from the grocery store! Grate it and inhale the aroma of it or eat it. The strong antiseptic and stimulant properties clear mucus in the sinuses and nasal passages in a hurry. But, don’t use too often or with children. The effect is too strong.

Reishi Mushroom

This mushroom, found primarily in China, is sometimes called the “queen of mushrooms.” It has many effects on the body, but when we fight allergies naturally, reishi works by boosting and stabilizing the immune system to work at its best. And, it inhibits histamine response which helps the allergy sufferer.

Astragalus

This root is well known to the Chinese and can be prepared as a decoction. It is often paired with others because of its tonic effects on the immune system and vital organs. It has shown anti-inflammatory, soothing, and repairing properties. A study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research in 2010 showed that an herbal mineral supplement containing Astragalus root significantly decreased seasonal allergy symptoms compared to placebo.

Marshmallow

Marshmallow is found in most parts of Europe and the U.S. along marshes and banks. It is said that its use goes as far back as the Romans. While most parts of the plant can be used, the root is most often used in a decoction. It has demulcent and emollient properties that soothe inflammation and irritation of the urinary and respiratory tracts. Paired with Astragalus, it helps soothe the irritated nose and throat of the allergy sufferer.

Fight Allergies Naturally with Essential Oils

On the podcast, Julie also talks about three oils that help reduce or eliminate seasonal allergy symptoms—Peppermint, Chamomile, and Niaouli. Want to know more? Discover more herbs and oils that can help you fight allergies naturally. Click HERE to get access to a short e-book on Essential Oils for Allergies when you scroll down to episode 8.

Don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

Help with Seasonal Allergies

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.

Help with Seasonal Allergies

Last week, Julie discussed the importance of addressing food allergies to recover from seasonal allergies. In addition to dietary changes, you can reduce seasonal allergy symptoms with some other simple strategies.

Home environment

Air filters

The first thing that Julie mentions is the positive effect that using room air filters can have. Also, keeping the windows closed or at most, cracked, also goes a long way toward reducing exposure. That’s the key. Reduce exposure to pollen, mold, and other allergens. In addition to room air filters, using a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter is a must.

Furniture and cleaners

Furniture with lots of cushions (such as couches) and rooms with wall-to-wall carpeting harbor more allergens. Stuffed animals also contribute. They are harder to clean thoroughly and it’s easy for allergens to get trapped. If you have many of these in your home, you will need to vacuum very thoroughly more often. You may also need to consider deep cleaning with a shampoo carpet cleaner (these can be used on couches) more often, too.

Be careful with the cleaners you choose so they are sanitizing, but non-irritating and safe for children and pets.

Steam inhalation

Neti pot

This was Julie’s best friend for a while! If you are not familiar with the neti pot, it looks like a small genie lamp. You fill it with a warm saltwater solution, tip your head, and slowly pour the solution into one nostril. The solution should come running out the other nostril. If not, you need to adjust the tilt of your head. You don’t want it running down your throat. The neti pot helps wash away inhaled allergens. It tends to be very calming and soothing to the nose and sinuses. This can be safely used when you have a cold, too.

Salt inhaler

For children, it’s hard to use a neti pot. Many adults also have a hard time using it. It can be uncomfortable. A salt inhaler is much easier to use, but each person needs to have their own. The idea is to breathe in the salt air through your mouth. Then, breathe out through your nose. After doing this for about ten to fifteen minutes, it clears the nasal passages and the lungs. It, too, can be helpful during times of illness and is safe for children.

Other Help with Seasonal Allergies

Honey and bee pollen

Eating locally grown honey or bee pollen before the allergy season starts can be helpful in teaching the body not to react to the local allergens. Some people swear by honey, but Julie has not found it to be effective on it’s own.

Quercitin

Another help with seasonal allergies is quercitin. Quercitin is a natural supplement that acts as an anti-histamine in the body. It is usually included in herbal remedies and is quite effective when coupled with one or more of the above helps. Julie used this in conjunction with other natural remedies that she will discuss next week!

Probiotics

Many people with seasonal allergies also have candida and gut issues. These gut issues are often caused by diet, as discussed in the last episode. They also stem from candida overgrowth and bacterial imbalances in the gut flora. Probiotics can be helpful in restoring the correct balance of good bacteria in the gut. I t can also keep candida (which is a fungus, just like mold is a fungus) in check. Again, it is best used as part of a complete program, not alone.

Julie will discuss using herbs and essential oils for seasonal allergies next week. So, don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

How to Treat Children’s Allergies Naturally

The Link Between Diet and Seasonal Allergies

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares her personal story and lessons about the link between diet and seasonal allergies.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares her personal story and lessons about the link between diet and seasonal allergies.

The Link Between Diet and Seasonal Allergies

Julie’s Personal Story

First, Julie shares her long struggle to overcome allergies, including seasonal ones. Julie’s journey began with undiagnosed food allergies when she was a little girl. As she got older, she suffered from seasonal allergies as well. Eventually, she became allergic to more 50 different foods and environmental allergens, and she also developed chemical sensitivities. In her mid-20’s she learned of the link between diet and seasonal allergies. Once she discovered this, her journey to health began.

Diet and Seasonal Allergies: What’s food got to do with it?

As Julie discusses on the podcast, certain foods irritate the gut lining, causing damage. For some people, this microscopic damage heals quickly and for others, it doesn’t. When it doesn’t heal quickly, food proteins can get into the blood stream. The immune system sees these proteins as foreign invaders and attacks them. This eventually leads the immune system to become hypersensitive and react to other, similar proteins. That’s how one allergy can become many allergies. If this goes on for too long, the body may even come to see itself as an invader. That’s where autoimmune conditions come from. Sounds crazy, but it’s true.

How Do You Heal?

For Julie, the answers came as she avoided certain foods and detoxified her body of all the allergens and other toxins. It wasn’t easy or quick, but took many months. As her body healed, she regained health and her symptoms faded. Some important steps:

  • Avoid all allergens. This often means an elimination diet and then a rotation diet. That’s what Julie did for the first year.
  • Do a detox. Just following the elimination diet puts the body into detox, but doing some type of fast speeds up the process. If you are weak or unhealthy, never do a fast without consulting a medical professional.
  • Nourish the body with nutrient-dense food, certain supplements, and specific herbs.
  • Heal the gut, but know that you may be part of the population that cannot ever eat certain foods. Julie discovered that she is one of them and this is genetic. All of her children showed the same issue very early in their lives.

Julie did beat seasonal allergies and even now doesn’t suffer from them, even in the worst years. It was simple, but it wasn’t easy.

To get a seasonal allergies report, click HERE. Once you’re in, click on the link for episode 6. This report will help you decide if your symptoms are allergies or an ongoing cold. It will also give you more information about causes and possible treatment options, including non-drug ones.

And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

Four Ways for Food to Grow Indoors

Today, on Crunchy Christian Podcast, Julie talks about four ways for food to grow indoors. Check out these methods and see if one of them might work for you!Today, on Crunchy Christian Podcast, Julie talks about four ways for food to grow indoors. Maybe you live in an apartment, have a small yard or patio, or your region allows for only a short growing season. Here are some ways to maximize your ability to grow your own food. You may not be able to grow squash indoors, but you can still grow many other plants, including lettuces; kale, spinach, and other greens; strawberries; peas and green beans; onions, garlic, and herbs; and others. Check out these methods and see if one of them might work for you.

Four Ways for Food to Grow Indoors

Grow Herbs

Growing herbs indoors in a greenhouse window in your kitchen or in small pots. Herbs are a great way to get started growing your own food. They smell good, add flavor and variety to cooking, and can be dried for year-round use. On the podcast, Julie shares the best herbs to grow indoors. And, don’t forget that culinary herbs are not the only herbs you can grow!

Grow sprouts and microgreens

Microgreens are the young plants of wheat, barley, broccoli, radish, watercress, beans, and a few others. The plants are generally less than 3 inches tall when eaten, thus the name “micro.” There are special trays for growing microgreens or you can use a sprouting jar. These are easy and quick to grow and are super nutritious! Listen in to find out more about the benefits of growing and eating them, as well as some tips for using a sprouting jar.

Try hydroponics for food to grow indoors

This system uses a special water solution and no soil. It often the water solution with a clear lid to capture the plants’ respiration and to create a greenhouse effect. This is best for smaller garden plants, like lettuces and other greens. It also requires a bit more work and special equipment.

A vertical garden works well indoors

A vertical garden uses some hydroponics technology and some composting to grow food vertically indoors in controlled environments. You can purchase a ready-made one or build your own using old gutters, PVC pipe, or other materials. This is probably the most involved, expensive way of growing food indoors, but it also produces the highest yields. It is possible to provide a small family with fresh vegetables year-round with a vertical farm system. Cities all over the world have converted old warehouses into vertical farms to help meet growing food needs.

Resources

All You Ever Wanted to Know About Microgreens

What is hydroponics? Learn the six types of hydroponics

How to Build Your Own DIY Vertical Farm: This offers a supplies list and step-by-step instructions. The finished vertical garden can live indoors or outdoors. An alternative to building your own is a product called Tower Garden (no affiliation).

How to Start Composting

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to start composting. Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to start composting. Composting is a great way to recycle the way that God recycles!

How to start composting

What is compost? What are the types?

Compost is basically decomposed waste matter from animals or plants. It is a major component of soil and returns nutrients to the earth so that new life can grow. Insects, earthworms, microbes, and fungi all feed on compost. Through their activities, they fix nitrogen, produce vitamins, and make minerals available to plants, who in turn, provide things that these organisms need. We usually think of compost as animal compost from rabbits, chickens, or cows. But, there’s also worm compost (also known as vermicomposting) and vegetable compost.

Why you should try it over fertilizers

Briefly, fertilizers only feed the plant and only for one season. Fertilizers also tend to promote above ground growth while the roots remain shallow and underdeveloped. In contrast, compost offers long-term benefits for plants and the soil. It is cheap, anyone with a yard can do it, and by enriching the soil, compost insures healthy plants for years. Julie discusses additional reasons on the podcast.

Worm composting versus vegetable composting

If you need compost right away, worm composting is the way to go. But, make sure you have the right worms and the right equipment! On the podcast, Julie shares her story of what happens when you try to cut corners. Don’t do what she did. If you want to know how to start composting this year in preparation for next year’s garden, then vegetable composting is for you. Vegetable composting is easy! Let Julie tell you how easy it is.

When you start composting, what do you put in the bin?

On the podcast, Julie talks about the two types of vegetable matter you can add to your bin—browns and greens. Never add animal products to your bin, except eggshells! But, even though you only add vegetable waste, a few things should be excluded from your bin. Those include weeds, diseased plants, seeds, and tough flower stalks. You don’t want to contaminate your garden or have unwanted plants growing in your bin!

To get a handy printable to keep the browns and greens straight, click HERE. Once you’re in, click on the link for episode 4. Post it up on your corkboard or refrigerator to help you remember how to properly compost.

Listen to Crunchy Christian Podcast to get the scoop on how start composting.

And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

 

Get Started on Square Foot Gardening

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to get started with square foot gardening.

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to get started with square foot gardening. This method is one of the most popular ways for beginning gardeners to grow food successfully. Square foot gardening can be customized to suit any size yard and any type of plant.

How to get started with square foot gardening: the basics

What is square foot gardening? How is it different from other types?

Instead of planting in rows, seeds are planted in square foot mini-plots. These one foot by one foot squares lie side by side, creating larger squares or a grid arrangement. Julie discusses some advantages of this arrangement in the show.

Why you should try it

On the show, Julie discusses several reasons why she feels square foot gardening is superior to other methods. Overall, it is the most organized way to garden that reduces waste and takes less work to maintain. When you get started with square foot gardening, you set yourself up for an enjoyable gardening experience for years to come. And, if you couple this method with raised beds, it allows you to continue to garden even as you age.

How much space do you want to devote to growing food?

Do you have eight square feet to work with or sixteen square feet? This method is for an outdoor garden only, but it doesn’t matter how small or large your yard is. Any size will work. And, you can split up the squares. Maybe you have a two foot by sixteen-foot space along the side of your house. But, you also have an eight foot by eight foot space next to your garage. You can use both spaces. As you get started with square foot gardening, you can get creative with your garden!

How you set up your square foot garden

Once you’ve decided how much space you have, it’s time to start marking off your squares, getting the soil ready, and planting your seeds. On the show, Julie discusses a couple of ways to set up your squares. Once you have that done, get the download she mentions by clicking HERE. The printable you receive through this link will help you decide what to grow in your squares. Some vegetables need more space than others or will require a trellis.

Listen to Crunchy Christian Podcast to get the scoop on how get started with square foot gardening.

And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

  • All New Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew. Now part of a set of six books, one of them about gardening with kids
  • Square Foot Gardening: How to Grow Healthy Organic Vegetables the Easy Way by James Paris
  • Vertical Gardening: Grow Up, Not Out, for More Vegetables and Flowers in Much Less Space by Derek Fell
  • The official site of Square Foot Gardening

How to Start Your Garden in a Small Space: 5 Easy Tips

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to start a garden in a small space.

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares how to start a garden in a small space. Growing food in a small space brings special challenges that owners of larger pieces of land don’t have to deal with. What if you live in an apartment, townhouse, or condo? What if you own a small city lot, like Julie does? How can you still enjoy the benefits of growing your own food?

And most of all, what if you’ve never grown anything in your life?

Now’s the time to get started!

 How to start a garden in a small space: 5 considerations

How much space do you want to devote to growing food?

The first thing to think about is where you will grow your food. Do you have space outdoors or will you grow food in pots on your apartment balcony? The amount of space you have will determine what you will grow and how much.

What vegetables does your family enjoy and which ones will you grow?

Julie offers a few ideas on how to decide which vegetables to grow.

Get the download she mentions by clicking HERE. The printable you receive through this link will help you decide what to grow in your small space. Some vegetables need more space than others or will require a trellis and others grow well in smaller spaces or in pots.

Where do you get quality seeds?

In this episode, Julie mentions a few different ways to get quality seeds for your garden. If you cannot get them from a local source, here are a few mail order sources:

Seed Savers Exchange

Harvesting History

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Grow Organic

Gardens Alive!

Julie has no affiliation with any of these companies and does not endorse one over the other. These sites are provided for your convenience.

How do you prepare the plot/pots where you will plant your garden?

Offer your vegetables and herbs the best chance of sprouting by optimizing the soil in your plot or pot. You do not want to use tons of compost or fertilizer. But, you also don’t want to just throw some seeds on your unprepared backyard soil. Julie gives some simple tips for getting your area ready before you plant any seeds.

What are the indoor/outdoor requirements for starting your seeds?

Some seeds need to be started indoors and some are direct seed. Some vegetables need lots of water in order to sprout and some need cold weather. When you receive your seed packets, pay special attention to this. Generally, delicate leafy vegetables do not do as well in direct, hot sun (think lettuce and spinach). Brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussel sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, and collards) like cooler weather also. However, tomatoes and peppers do best in the hot summer sun. Another example is carrots. Carrots need consistently moist soil to sprout, but other vegetable seeds drown with too much water. So, it’s important to check on the specific recommendations for the vegetables you’re growing.

Listen to Crunchy Christian Podcast to get the full scoop on how to start your garden in a small space.

And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

What is Crunchy Christian Podcast About?

Join Julie Polanco as she shares what Crunchy Christian Podcast is all about. Find out how the Vine of the Gospel of John beautifully wove plants into Julie’s story and what you can expect each week on the new Crunchy Christian Podcast.Join Julie Polanco as she shares what Crunchy Christian Podcast is all about. It all started in a vacant lot down the street where common weeds became her sanctuary. Find out how the Vine of the Gospel of John beautifully wove plants into Julie’s story and what you can expect each week on the new Crunchy Christian Podcast.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Julie Naturally. You can receive a FREE Healthy Living Tracker by clicking on this link: Click HERE

 

 


Welcome to Crunchy Christian Podcast with Julie Polanco, MH!

Every Friday, Master Herbalist and veteran Christian unschooler, Julie Polanco, shares hope, how-to’s, and a bit of humor from her unschooling family’s adventures as city homesteaders pursuing God’s best naturally.

Become more self-reliant as you listen to Julie share lessons from her years of growing and preserving all things green.

Learn historic uses and preparations of roots, seeds, stems, bark, leaves, and flowers from across God’s Creation.

Laugh with Julie as she remembers mistakes and mishaps her family experienced over the past two decades seeking the natural, crunchy Christian life.

Listen to more Crunchy Christian Podcasts here!