Natural Summer Foot Care

Learn natural ways to care for your feet during the active summer months.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural summer foot care. Learn how to use natural remedies for warts and athlete’s foot.

Natural Summer Foot Care

Summertime seems to be fraught with foot challenges. After spending some time walking around barefoot at a pool, we often contract warts. If we do a lot of hiking or running, we may develop athlete’s foot. Over the counter conventional remedies are usually effective treatments, but sometimes we have an especially resistant case. That’s happened to me. Listen on the podcast as I tell about these challenging cases and what finally worked.

Natural Summer Foot Care for Warts

People often think that a fungus causes warts. Not true. It’s actually viral. That means that warts can reappear even after you get rid of them. Keeping your immune system strong helps keep the virus that causes warts dormant. Another thing that helps is keeping your skin clean and dry. Always wear flip flops in shared showers (such as dorms, locker rooms, and pools) and wash and dry your feet well. Now, most people have had warts on their feet at some time or other. I encountered a particularly hard case with my son one year. While his warts were all over his hand, they could just as easily have been all over his feet. And, the treatment is the same. I used an essential blend of thuja, ravintsara, tea tree, geranium, and niaouli. After applying after every handwashing over the course of about 36 hours, the warts started falling off!

Helps for Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is caused by a fungus that grows in warm, moist environments, just like other fungi, such as mushrooms. Keeping your feet dry and increasing air circulation around your toes are the first natural summer foot care tips you should follow. You can also help yourself by taking a pro-biotic on a regular basis. This will help your natural flora defend you. It will also complement any other remedies you try.

Apple Cider Vinegar

One summer I contracted a weird foot infection that didn’t look like athlete’s foot, but it sure itched! It wasn’t scaly like the usual fungal infection. Instead, it had these hard, red spots almost like warts. But, I knew my issue wasn’t caused by warts. Anyway, I had tried tea tree oil first. That seemed to keep it from spreading, but the hard, red spots were still there. So, for my natural summer foot care, I decided to soak my feet in apple cider vinegar. I sat there for a while, maybe 20 minutes, with my feet in the vinegar. My feet started to feel tingly and I noticed that there was something different about those hard spots. I repeated this treatment a few more times and the spots dried up and scaled off, leaving my skin smooth.

Essential Oils for Athlete’s Foot

Essential oils effective against athlete’s foot are: tea tree, lavender, oregano, and thyme oils. I mentioned that tea tree oil only kept it from spreading, but that could have been because I waited so long to begin using it. And, I didn’t apply it often enough. I only applied it once or twice a day. If you choose to use essential oils, begin using them as soon as you see symptoms. And, make sure you apply them at least three times and up to five times daily. You can use lavender or tea tree without dilution, but if you choose to use a “hot” oil like oregano or thyme, dilute it in some olive oil or almond oil before applying. You can also add a few drops of one of these oils to some corn starch and use as a medicated foot powder.

Don’t have essential oils? What about herbal treatments? Listen to the podcast to find out about herbal salves you can use as natural summer foot care for athlete’s foot.

 Additional Resources

Alternative Treatments for Warts: A blog post about my adventures with wart treatments.

A Story About Bacterial Infection at the Beach: Don’t expect the lifeguard station to have bandaids, as I discovered. Read more about this adventure by clicking the link.

Dr. Axe talks about Black Walnut: read a super in-depth article about Black Walnut and its properties.

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Natural Hydration Drinks for Summer

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural hydration drinks. Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural hydration drinks. Ditch those sugary electrolyte sports beverages and learn how to properly re-hydrate after hiking, biking, running, swimming, and the like. Nourish your body right!

Natural Hydration Drinks Perfect for Summer

Now that we’re all more active, we run the risk of dehydration and heat exhaustion. Our first instinct is to reach for those grocery store sports drinks. But, those are full of sugar, not to mention synthetically produced electrolytes. What can we do instead? What natural hydration drinks did our ancestors drink, especially since farm labor kept them in the fields for long hours in the hot sun?  They didn’t have those colorful sports drinks we have.

A word about water

Before we talk about natural hydration drinks, we need to talk about your water needs. If your diet is high in fats and fruits and vegetables, you are getting some hydration from the food you eat. A high protein diet may cause you to get dehydrated faster. That’s why the best snack to take on a hike is trail mix. Too much water taxes the kidneys, just like too much protein also taxes the kidneys. How much is recommended? The rule of thumb is men should drink 13-15 cups and women, 9-11 cups, but there are actually no real scientific studies to support that. Each person’s need depends on age, gender, weight, and activity level. Remember what I said about fruit and vegetable intake, which usually accounts for about 20% of your water need. Other sources of water include tea, coffee, milk, juice, and soda.

Signs of dehydration and heat exhaustion

So how do you know if you’re dehydrated? Let’s briefly discuss the signs of dehydration and heat exhaustion. The easiest and most obvious sign of dehydration is dark urine and excreting less urine. If you are also feeling sluggish and tired and craving sugar, you need to get hydrated. If you experience dizziness, fainting, confusion, or heart palpitations, get medical attention immediately. Severe dehydration is an emergency. Don’t let it get that bad!

Heat exhaustion often occurs along with dehydration since it happens because of not getting enough fluids. If the body can’t cool itself in the extreme heat, you may experience many of the severe dehydration symptoms. But with heat exhaustion, you will also experience muscle cramps, headache, lots of sweating and cold clammy skin, and feeling tired. It is very important that you get to a cool place and help the body cool down. Get hydrated, too. Otherwise, it may progress to heat stroke. However, plain water is often not enough. Try these natural hydration drinks instead.

Fruits and Vegetables for Natural Hydration Drinks

On the show, Julie talks about how to use lemon, cucumber, celery, and watermelon to help address hydration needs. She also discusses how to make tasty natural hydration drinks from ginger and oranges. Her family has used traditional fermentation techniques to create healthy inexpensive alternatives to sports drinks.

Other drinks

Julie also briefly discusses kombucha and water kefir as health drinks that can help with keeping hydrated on a hot day. Listen and find out more!

 Additional Resources

Weston Price Foundation: Lots of information about the health benefits of lacto-fermented foods and beverages.

Nourished Kitchen: a post about different types of fermented drinks and needed supplies.

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Herbal First Aid Essentials

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses herbal first aid. Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses herbal first aid. She talks about what you need to keep in your cupboard or take with you on your outdoor adventures. Ready to stock your medicine cabinet with natural helps for scrapes, bruises, and other emergencies? Let’s dig in!

Herbal First Aid Essentials

Before we dig into the herbal first aid and what to stock, let’s talk a bit about first aid. What do we need our remedies to do? We need herbs and essential oils that will soothe and heal burns and scrapes while also keeping infection away. If they can help stop bleeding, that’s great, too. What about muscle sprains and bruising? Headaches? Nausea? Stomach aches? Let’s see what we can keep on hand to address these occasional needs. (If you are experiencing muscle aches, bruising, headaches, nausea, or stomach aches frequently, something more serious may be going on. You need more than herbal first aid).

You can get a FREE PDF, Putting Together a Natural First Aid Kit, by clicking HERE.

Natural Items

These items are not herbs or essential oils, but they are natural items that are very useful in a variety of ways.

Apple Cider Vinegar

As I mentioned in the last episode, apple cider vinegar helps repel mosquitoes. It can also be used for soothing sunburn if diluted and for soothing bug bites. It can also help with poison ivy exposure and minor indigestion. It’s inexpensive and great to have around.

Hydrogen peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide is safer than rubbing alcohol and you may choose to include it for minor wound cleaning, not deep wounds. Use diluted or sparingly, though. It can also be used for sanitizing, too, since it effectively kills yeast and other fungi, bacteria, and viruses, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Bring it along in a small bottle on hikes and it effectively cleans any wildcrafted food you collect. It will also keep your toothbrush and dishes clean on those summer camping trips.

Hear about some additional natural items to include in your herbal first aid kit on the podcast.

Herbal First Aid Kit Essentials

Cayenne Pepper

Believe it or not, sprinkling dried and powdered cayenne pepper directly into bleeding wounds stops the bleeding. It doesn’t sting, either. Cayenne causes the blood to redistribute throughout the body and coagulate at the wound site.

Witch Hazel

This astringent, anti-inflammatory herb helps ward off infection, soothe sore throats, and help with irritated inflamed skin.

Arnica

This herb is essential for muscle aches and pains and helping heal bruises faster. It usually comes in a cream or gel.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil is an absolute must. It is antimicrobial and antiviral and gentle enough to be used on children’s skin. It’s very good at warding off infections and soothing burns and scrapes. Also helpful with warts and other skin issues.

Julie talks about additional herbal helps on the podcast. Tune in and stock up!

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Natural Remedies for Bug Bites

Natural Remedies for Bug BitesJoin Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural remedies for bug bites. She talks about natural repellents, mosquito bites, and bee stings.

Natural Remedies for Bug Bites

Natural Bug Repellent

First, you can minimize your exposure by wearing long, light colored clothing and sealing all “entrances” whenever you are in an environment where there are lots of bugs. That means a white, long-sleeved shirt, white neck kerchief, and tan or other light-colored pants tucked inside your socks or boots. You can also help protect yourself by staying indoors at dusk, the time when most mosquitos come out. Bees are easier to spot and so they are easier to avoid most of the time. Ticks can be more difficult, but if your body is covered (even your head), you reduce the risk of getting bitten by a tick.

In addition to wearing long clothes and a hat, you can use a natural bug repellent that won’t irritate your skin and will keep insects at bay. It doesn’t kill bugs, it only keeps them away because they find the smell unpleasant.

DIY Bug Spray

To make your own bug spray, combine the following essential oils in equal amounts: Citronella,

Clove, Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Mint, Lavender, and Cedar. It’s fine to add about 3-4 drops of each in a 4 oz. spray bottle and add water. Don’t just spray your skin, but your clothes, too. Remember, essential oils are produced by plants to protect themselves from disease and pests. That’s why they can protect you, too. And, just like any other bug repellent, you need to re-spray at least every two hours. The alternative to natural repellents is DEET based sprays. On the show, Julie talks a bit about DEET and how it was developed.

 

Apple Cider Vinegar

Another natural option to repel mosquitoes from your skin and keep them from biting you is with apple cider vinegar. This is all natural and won’t harm your skin, though you should test it on a small area first to make sure you don’t get an allergic reaction. You can rub it directly on your skin, but if you don’t like  the smell, you can also dilute it with some water first. If you start adding apple cider vinegar to your foods or your water, you can actually build up an odor in your skin that mosquitoes and flies hate and they will eventually leave you alone. In addition to apple cider vinegar, eating lots of garlic and avoiding sugar can also help repel mosquitoes.

 

Bee Stings

First, of course, is to try to avoid getting stung. If a bee is near you, do not agitate the bee by waving your arms around. Try moving to another area. If they see you as a threat, bees release chemicals into the air that alert other bees. You don’t want that! Since sweet smells attract them, as well as certain types of patterns on clothes, keep that in mind. If a bee stings you, don’t panic. Try one of these natural remedies for bug bites. And, if your affected body part starts swelling abnormally, seek immediate medical attention! You are allergic.

Plantain

This weed is found almost everywhere and in a pinch, can be chewed and applied directly to the site. In fact, my son was stung by a bee on a hike once. We didn’t have anything with us, but plantain grew everywhere. I pulled up some leaves, chewed them, and applied the poultice to the site. Don’t you just love how plants are always there to help us?

Meat tenderizer

When I was a child, this was my mom’s home remedy. She made a paste with it and applied it directly to the sting site. After about 20 minutes or so, the sting went away and the swelling went down.

On the podcast, Julie talks about a few other natural ways to deal with the itching and swelling. Tune in and get relief!

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural remedies for sunburn. She talks about both protecting your skin and helping your skin heal.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural remedies for sunburn. She talks about both protecting your skin and helping your skin heal.

Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Conditioning the Skin

There are ways to prevent sunburn besides avoiding the sun. In fact, we shouldn’t avoid sunlight altogether since we need it so much for good health. However, we don’t want to burn the skin. Sunburn is linked to skin cancer and premature aging.  So, the best way to get enough sun without burning the skin is to spend only 20 minutes at a time out in bright sunlight. If you want to be able to spend more time in the sun, start with 20 minutes a day and gradually add more time each day.

It’s best if you start doing this in late spring. This gradual conditioning will help prevent burning as your skin gets used to more sun exposure. It will release more melanin, causing you to tan instead. If you are very light skinned, you might want to start with only 10 minutes a day and add 5 minutes daily starting in mid-spring. This can be a tedious process, but it will help you avoid sun burn and it gets you outside! It will not help you avoid pre-mature aging, though.

Get the free report for this episode for some ideas on how to pretreat skin to counter aging. You can also wear a wide brimmed hat and loose, thin, white clothing to both stay cool and cover your skin. In addition, stay indoors in the hottest hours of the day, usually 12pm-2pm. But, what are some natural remedies for sunburn when you stay a bit too long out there enjoying the summer sun?

Essential Oils That Are Natural Remedies for Sunburn

Lavender

Lavender essential oil is one of the most popular oils because it is so versatile and gentle. Most of the time we use it to help calm down and sleep. But, it’s also good for calming the skin and helping sunburn to heal. It can be used in dilution with children.

Moroccan Chamomile

Chamomile is another favorite with families because it, too, is gentle enough for children and also has a calming, healing effect. Just make sure you have the right chamomile. Not all of them work the same.

Geranium

Geranium essential oil has long been used in natural skincare formulas and helps rejuvenate skin and protect against aging. It nourishes, heals, and promotes healthy, radiant skin.

Everlasting

Helichrysum, or everlasting, oil is the premier oil for growing new skin. Adding it to a sunburn formula will help the skin heal faster and look younger.

Herbs/Plants

Aloe vera Gel

Everyone knows about aloe vera gel for burns. It cools and moisturizes the skin as it brings down inflammation. Best used immediately after burning and check the label for added ingredients. Sometimes, store bought aloe products include other ingredients.

Calendula Ointment with Carrot Seed Oil

Did you know that Calendula is the scientific name for marigolds? That means that you can make this ointment yourself at home without any special equipment. This combination works great for household burns, too. On the podcast, Julie tells a story of incredible healing using this formula.

St. John’s Wort Oil

Did you know that St. John’s Wort not only helps with emotional and mental health, but can also help with burns and viral infections as well?

Other Natural Remedies for Sunburn

On the podcast, Julie also talks about using cucumber, vitamin A and E, shea butter, coconut oil to help heal burned skin.

Get your short report, Natural Sunscreen and Sunburn Protection, by clicking HERE. Once you put in your email and get to the downloads page, just scroll down to episode 10 and grab your freebie.

Don’t forget to subscribe! Check out the new gardening e-book collection in the Julie Naturally shop.

Natural Ways to Fight Inflammation

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural ways to fight inflammation that makes our noses, ears, and throats all itchy during allergy season.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses natural ways to fight inflammation that makes our noses, ears, and throats all itchy during allergy season.

Natural Ways to Fight Inflammation

A bit about histamines

Since the sneezing and itching associated with seasonal allergies are caused by histamines, this episode is about reducing histamines. When your body releases histamines, a chain reaction occurs. Histamine affects your heart and blood vessels, lungs, eyes and nose, and digestive system.   It also increases swelling and inflammation (which can cause headaches, sleep issues, and other problems) and causes an adrenaline rush. Normally, your immune system releases histamines in response to an invader to mobilize the body to get rid of it. In the case of seasonal allergies, the body sees the allergens as invaders. So, the body ends up chronically inflamed and revved up.

Eliminate or reduce foods high in histamines

Did you know that one of the natural ways to fight inflammation is to reduce your intake of foods containing histamines? On the podcast, Julie talks about these foods. To reduce the histamine load in your body, you will need try to eat less of these foods. In addition, it helps to eat more of the foods that fight inflammation, particularly those high in B vitamins and vitamin C. Julie talks about those, too, in the podcast.

Eliminate other inflammatory foods

Besides foods high in histamines, it also helps to reduce or eliminate foods that promote inflammation in your body. These foods work against your efforts to reduce seasonal allergies symptoms. In the podcast, Julie discusses these problematic foods, one of the biggest culprits being white sugar. If you want to use natural ways to fight inflammation, reducing sugar intake needs to be near the top of the list.

Is it histamine intolerance?

There is no known test for histamine intolerance, but it is a genetic condition. Doctors think that people with this condition produce low amounts of the enzymes that break down histamines. So, to prevent flare-ups, people who suffer with histamine intolerance need to eliminate high histamine foods from their diets. Check out the link below for more information on that.

Other natural ways to fight inflammation

Histamine release is not just associated with invaders or pseudo-invaders, like allergens. It is also associated with certain medications, such as antibiotics, and with stress. Reducing stress can help with lowering inflammation. Try some of the suggestions Julie makes on the podcast. Another way to reduce histamine levels is through increasing your Omega-3 fatty acid intake by eating more grass-fed butter, wild caught salmon, avocados, olive oil, and pastured chicken. It also helps to eat foods high in calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, B12, and iron. For some examples of these, listen to the podcast!

Don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

 

Fight Allergies Naturally with Herbs and Essential Oils

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses how to fight allergies naturally with herbs and essential oils.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses how to fight allergies naturally with herbs and essential oils.

Fight Allergies Naturally!

Before talking about herbs and essential oils, please remember that all information shared is for educational purposes only. This discussion about the historical and personal uses of herbs and essential oils does not constitute medical advice. Herbs and oils don’t cure anything. They simply provide the raw materials for your body to heal itself the way God intended it to do. So, if you choose to fight allergies naturally, keep this in mind.

Fight Allergies Naturally with Herbs

As mentioned in previous episodes, herbs and oils work best as part of a wholistic approach to wellness. Diet, habits, and herbs/oils work together to heal your body. In the podcast, Julie covers a few herbs and oils, but they aren’t the only ones that help! The ones discussed are safer and more readily available than some other plants.

A note about children: rarely do children under age 5 show signs of seasonal allergies unless they have severe allergies to other things as well. Julie’s sons showed seasonal allergy symptoms at age 4, but they also tested positive for more than fifteen total allergens. These other allergens included foods and animals. It is imperative that the food allergens are addressed even while using herbal remedies. The sooner, the better. Otherwise, they could face a lifetime of misery and eventually, autoimmune conditions as well!

Nettles

Nettles can be found all over the world and tends to live in wooded areas. The leaves are most often used even though they have stinging hairs all along the edges of them. If you trigger any of these hairs, you will develop the characteristic red, itchy, inflamed rash. In the podcast, Julie tells about the antidote to the venom and some unusual historical uses of this plant.

Nettles can be prepared as an extract or as an infusion. It is the most frequently used herb to fight allergies naturally because of its astringent and anti-asthmatic properties. It tends to dry up mucus and improve air flow. It is also widely available compared to some other herbs and in many places, can be wild-harvested or grown in your yard.

Horseradish

Yes, this is that pungent vegetable root from the grocery store! Grate it and inhale the aroma of it or eat it. The strong antiseptic and stimulant properties clear mucus in the sinuses and nasal passages in a hurry. But, don’t use too often or with children. The effect is too strong.

Reishi Mushroom

This mushroom, found primarily in China, is sometimes called the “queen of mushrooms.” It has many effects on the body, but when we fight allergies naturally, reishi works by boosting and stabilizing the immune system to work at its best. And, it inhibits histamine response which helps the allergy sufferer.

Astragalus

This root is well known to the Chinese and can be prepared as a decoction. It is often paired with others because of its tonic effects on the immune system and vital organs. It has shown anti-inflammatory, soothing, and repairing properties. A study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research in 2010 showed that an herbal mineral supplement containing Astragalus root significantly decreased seasonal allergy symptoms compared to placebo.

Marshmallow

Marshmallow is found in most parts of Europe and the U.S. along marshes and banks. It is said that its use goes as far back as the Romans. While most parts of the plant can be used, the root is most often used in a decoction. It has demulcent and emollient properties that soothe inflammation and irritation of the urinary and respiratory tracts. Paired with Astragalus, it helps soothe the irritated nose and throat of the allergy sufferer.

Fight Allergies Naturally with Essential Oils

On the podcast, Julie also talks about three oils that help reduce or eliminate seasonal allergy symptoms—Peppermint, Chamomile, and Niaouli. Want to know more? Discover more herbs and oils that can help you fight allergies naturally. Click HERE to get access to a short e-book on Essential Oils for Allergies when you scroll down to episode 8.

Don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

Help with Seasonal Allergies

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.

Help with Seasonal Allergies

Last week, Julie discussed the importance of addressing food allergies to recover from seasonal allergies. In addition to dietary changes, you can reduce seasonal allergy symptoms with some other simple strategies.

Home environment

Air filters

The first thing that Julie mentions is the positive effect that using room air filters can have. Also, keeping the windows closed or at most, cracked, also goes a long way toward reducing exposure. That’s the key. Reduce exposure to pollen, mold, and other allergens. In addition to room air filters, using a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter is a must.

Furniture and cleaners

Furniture with lots of cushions (such as couches) and rooms with wall-to-wall carpeting harbor more allergens. Stuffed animals also contribute. They are harder to clean thoroughly and it’s easy for allergens to get trapped. If you have many of these in your home, you will need to vacuum very thoroughly more often. You may also need to consider deep cleaning with a shampoo carpet cleaner (these can be used on couches) more often, too.

Be careful with the cleaners you choose so they are sanitizing, but non-irritating and safe for children and pets.

Steam inhalation

Neti pot

This was Julie’s best friend for a while! If you are not familiar with the neti pot, it looks like a small genie lamp. You fill it with a warm saltwater solution, tip your head, and slowly pour the solution into one nostril. The solution should come running out the other nostril. If not, you need to adjust the tilt of your head. You don’t want it running down your throat. The neti pot helps wash away inhaled allergens. It tends to be very calming and soothing to the nose and sinuses. This can be safely used when you have a cold, too.

Salt inhaler

For children, it’s hard to use a neti pot. Many adults also have a hard time using it. It can be uncomfortable. A salt inhaler is much easier to use, but each person needs to have their own. The idea is to breathe in the salt air through your mouth. Then, breathe out through your nose. After doing this for about ten to fifteen minutes, it clears the nasal passages and the lungs. It, too, can be helpful during times of illness and is safe for children.

Other Help with Seasonal Allergies

Honey and bee pollen

Eating locally grown honey or bee pollen before the allergy season starts can be helpful in teaching the body not to react to the local allergens. Some people swear by honey, but Julie has not found it to be effective on it’s own.

Quercitin

Another help with seasonal allergies is quercitin. Quercitin is a natural supplement that acts as an anti-histamine in the body. It is usually included in herbal remedies and is quite effective when coupled with one or more of the above helps. Julie used this in conjunction with other natural remedies that she will discuss next week!

Probiotics

Many people with seasonal allergies also have candida and gut issues. These gut issues are often caused by diet, as discussed in the last episode. They also stem from candida overgrowth and bacterial imbalances in the gut flora. Probiotics can be helpful in restoring the correct balance of good bacteria in the gut. I t can also keep candida (which is a fungus, just like mold is a fungus) in check. Again, it is best used as part of a complete program, not alone.

Julie will discuss using herbs and essential oils for seasonal allergies next week. So, don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

How to Treat Children’s Allergies Naturally

The Link Between Diet and Seasonal Allergies

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares her personal story and lessons about the link between diet and seasonal allergies.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she shares her personal story and lessons about the link between diet and seasonal allergies.

The Link Between Diet and Seasonal Allergies

Julie’s Personal Story

First, Julie shares her long struggle to overcome allergies, including seasonal ones. Julie’s journey began with undiagnosed food allergies when she was a little girl. As she got older, she suffered from seasonal allergies as well. Eventually, she became allergic to more 50 different foods and environmental allergens, and she also developed chemical sensitivities. In her mid-20’s she learned of the link between diet and seasonal allergies. Once she discovered this, her journey to health began.

Diet and Seasonal Allergies: What’s food got to do with it?

As Julie discusses on the podcast, certain foods irritate the gut lining, causing damage. For some people, this microscopic damage heals quickly and for others, it doesn’t. When it doesn’t heal quickly, food proteins can get into the blood stream. The immune system sees these proteins as foreign invaders and attacks them. This eventually leads the immune system to become hypersensitive and react to other, similar proteins. That’s how one allergy can become many allergies. If this goes on for too long, the body may even come to see itself as an invader. That’s where autoimmune conditions come from. Sounds crazy, but it’s true.

How Do You Heal?

For Julie, the answers came as she avoided certain foods and detoxified her body of all the allergens and other toxins. It wasn’t easy or quick, but took many months. As her body healed, she regained health and her symptoms faded. Some important steps:

  • Avoid all allergens. This often means an elimination diet and then a rotation diet. That’s what Julie did for the first year.
  • Do a detox. Just following the elimination diet puts the body into detox, but doing some type of fast speeds up the process. If you are weak or unhealthy, never do a fast without consulting a medical professional.
  • Nourish the body with nutrient-dense food, certain supplements, and specific herbs.
  • Heal the gut, but know that you may be part of the population that cannot ever eat certain foods. Julie discovered that she is one of them and this is genetic. All of her children showed the same issue very early in their lives.

Julie did beat seasonal allergies and even now doesn’t suffer from them, even in the worst years. It was simple, but it wasn’t easy.

To get a seasonal allergies report, click HERE. Once you’re in, click on the link for episode 6. This report will help you decide if your symptoms are allergies or an ongoing cold. It will also give you more information about causes and possible treatment options, including non-drug ones.

And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

Four Ways for Food to Grow Indoors

Today, on Crunchy Christian Podcast, Julie talks about four ways for food to grow indoors. Check out these methods and see if one of them might work for you!Today, on Crunchy Christian Podcast, Julie talks about four ways for food to grow indoors. Maybe you live in an apartment, have a small yard or patio, or your region allows for only a short growing season. Here are some ways to maximize your ability to grow your own food. You may not be able to grow squash indoors, but you can still grow many other plants, including lettuces; kale, spinach, and other greens; strawberries; peas and green beans; onions, garlic, and herbs; and others. Check out these methods and see if one of them might work for you.

Four Ways for Food to Grow Indoors

Grow Herbs

Growing herbs indoors in a greenhouse window in your kitchen or in small pots. Herbs are a great way to get started growing your own food. They smell good, add flavor and variety to cooking, and can be dried for year-round use. On the podcast, Julie shares the best herbs to grow indoors. And, don’t forget that culinary herbs are not the only herbs you can grow!

Grow sprouts and microgreens

Microgreens are the young plants of wheat, barley, broccoli, radish, watercress, beans, and a few others. The plants are generally less than 3 inches tall when eaten, thus the name “micro.” There are special trays for growing microgreens or you can use a sprouting jar. These are easy and quick to grow and are super nutritious! Listen in to find out more about the benefits of growing and eating them, as well as some tips for using a sprouting jar.

Try hydroponics for food to grow indoors

This system uses a special water solution and no soil. It often the water solution with a clear lid to capture the plants’ respiration and to create a greenhouse effect. This is best for smaller garden plants, like lettuces and other greens. It also requires a bit more work and special equipment.

A vertical garden works well indoors

A vertical garden uses some hydroponics technology and some composting to grow food vertically indoors in controlled environments. You can purchase a ready-made one or build your own using old gutters, PVC pipe, or other materials. This is probably the most involved, expensive way of growing food indoors, but it also produces the highest yields. It is possible to provide a small family with fresh vegetables year-round with a vertical farm system. Cities all over the world have converted old warehouses into vertical farms to help meet growing food needs.

Resources

All You Ever Wanted to Know About Microgreens

What is hydroponics? Learn the six types of hydroponics

How to Build Your Own DIY Vertical Farm: This offers a supplies list and step-by-step instructions. The finished vertical garden can live indoors or outdoors. An alternative to building your own is a product called Tower Garden (no affiliation).