HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

This week on HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar.

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School. This interview with Peggy Ployhar of SPED Homeschool gives inspiration, encouragement and success tips for parents of special needs teens. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolSpecialNeeds #SpecialNeedsTeens #SPEDHomeschool

 

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

Every teen has a place in God’s kingdom, but not every teen’s journey looks alike. Some homeschool high schoolers have different learning styles, learning differences or learning disabilities. These special needs don’t mean you can’t homeschool your teen for high school. In fact, homeschooling high school might be the VERY best choice for them. You can individualize their education to:

  • Develop their strengths
  • Compensate for their weaknesses
  • Give them skills for life
  • Help them believe in God’s plans for them

Vicki is joined today by Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool to discuss help for special needs in homeschool high school.

Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool

Photo used by permission.

Peggy is a long-time homeschool mom and community leader. Her 2 sons both have special needs so based on her experience with her sons, she jumped into the role of community advisor for families with special needs. That service grew until the need was clear for an organization dedicated to helping special needs families. That’s how SPED Homeschool got started, a dedicated team of homeschooling parents who are:

  • Vetting homeschool curriculum for use with special needs homeschoolers
  • Training other homeschool parents in skills for helping their special needs homeschoolers
  • Reminding parents that there’s not ONE approach that will work for all special needs homeschool high schoolers. Of course, we 7Sisters are excited about that since we’re always saying there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school.
  • Making available advice from experts

Check out SPED Homeschool’s website, and facebook pages.

SPED Homeschool

One of the most important things that Peggy learned about homeschooling high school with her special needs teens was RELATIONSHIP is more important than education. As she kept the relationship with her sons as number one priority, she was able to:

  • Stay flexible, very flexible!
  • Make wise choices for and with her teens
    • curriculum
    • goals
    • resources
  • Create an educational program that adapts as her teens grew and changed
  • Push teens graciously in their giftedness areas

Peggy tells the story of her son telling her at age 16 that he *was done* with high school. She calmed herself and worked with him to quickly set goals for meeting graduation requirements at a minimal (not college-prep) level. He blasted through his courses, took a gap year to explore and became the tech genius behind all SPED’s technology. He eventually went to college, because he felt the calling at that time and did college in his way.

Want more resources? 7Sisters has an Authoritative Guide to Out of the Box Credits for Homeschooling High School with Special Needs Teens

You’ll be SO encouraged by this episode of Homeschool CPA with our friend, Carol Topp, as she shares resources for special needs homeschoolers in co-ops.

Join Vicki and Peggy for this encouraging interview on homeschooling teens with special needs.

Want more ideas on homeschooling high school with special needs teens? Check out this video with Vicki and Peggy.


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School.

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School. Successful homeschool high school years start with planning. Here are steps to build your confidence for homeschooling high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolPlanning #PlanningHomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolSuccess #7SistersHomeschool

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

Homeschooling high school can feel intimidating before you get started! Vicki remembers when her oldest was in middle school, she was so nervous about homeschool high school that she gathered a group of homeschool moms together to have weekly prayer and resource sharing. The confidence they gained from the process gave them the courage to move forward (and some of them ultimately began co-oping together).

One thing Vicki and the rest of the 7Sisters discovered is that they feel SO much better when they get some solid planning accomplished. Join Sabrina and Vicki for a quick, lively discussion about planning homeschool high school.

Here’s the first and most important thing to know:

There’s not ONE right way to plan your homeschool high school year (or all 4 years of high school).

But if we follow this simple journalism-style framework, it will help! WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY, and HOW!

The *Who* of planning homeschool high school

While this may seem obvious. You’re homeschooling your teens, that’s who! But, as you know, in homeschooling, the entire family is involved or affected. As Sabrina says, “There a multi-dimentionality to homeschooling high school”. Ask yourself

  • Who all will be homeschooling this year?
  • What is each family member’s educational experience?
  • What are their strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are their learning styles?
  • What are their interests?
  • What are the parents’ strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are their teaching styles?
  • What are their interests?

Remember: There's not ONE right way to homeschool high school. High school curriculum and teaching styles should be as individual as your teens and your family.

The *What* of planning homeschool high school

This is the bulk of your planning! Give yourself time to pray and sort this out. Make sure to include your teens in the process. Remember:
There’s not ONE right way to teach the subjects in high school. The joy of homeschooling is teaching in the order and with the curriculum that best suits your family and your teens. Here’s a helpful post with no-fail steps to choosing curriculum.

You’ll also love this encouraging episode of Homeschool Sanity about choosing curriculum.

What do you want to teach this year? There’s not one specific order that you much use to teach History and Language Arts/Literature. There is flexibility in the order of Sciences (although many people teach Biology before Chemistry, often 10th and 11th grades). There is only a little flexibility in the order of Maths (Algebra 1 comes before Algebra 2, unless you use an integrated math).

Here are suggestions for the order of research paper writing during high school.

Here are suggestions for an order of Literature topics for high school.

What curriculum do you like to use? What works for your teens learning styles? Are their curricula that you can’t stand (Vicki has a difficult time with books that have no photos…she needs entertainment! SO even though her teens might be ok with a bland-looking text, Vicki goes for those that include pictures.)

What courses will you need this year for the transcript? These will get priority in your planning.

How much academics can your teens handle. Non-college-bound teens don’t need to do overkills on numbers of courses or levels of rigor. College-bound teens (especially if they are aiming for competitive colleges) will need more courses and more rigor. Be sure to leave unnecessary stuff out but don’t over stress you and teens.

The *When* of planning homeschool high school

There’s totally not ONE right way to handle the homeschool academic schedule. What works best for your family this year?

  • Block scheduling?
  • Year round?
  • 30 week year?
  • 4 day week?

Choose the best schedule to fit your family’s needs. Homeschooling is a lifestyle choice! Ask yourself these questions:

  • Is mom working full time or part time? If so when? Working at home or out of home?
  • Is a family member on shift work? Does the house need to be quiet so dad can sleep on some days?
  • Are you morning people or night owls?
  • What extracurriculars will your homeschool high schoolers be involved in? (How much car schooling will you need to do?)

Sit down with a calendar. Write in the musts. Fit the curriculum around it. (Really…but just make sure it gets done, of course.) Include your teens in the process!

Get some GREAT tips for scheduling in this interview with Melanie Wilson of Homeschool Sanity Podcast!

The *Where* of planning homeschool high school

The location-style of your family’s homeschooling is important in your planning. Remember: There’s not ONE right location for homeschooling high school. Ask yourself these questions:

  • Do you have a dedicated school room? Do you have a dedicated homeschool space? (Vicki and Sabrina both found out that no matter what they planned for *education location*, the entire house was the school room. Their houses are full of bookshelves mixed with other stuff, couches laden with school books, sprawling teens and guitars. That was right for their families!)
  • You MUST remember this: There is NO such thing as a Pinterest-perfect homeschool house!
  • Where are you connecting with other homeschoolers for group learning (online, none, local)?
  • Where are your teens doing internships (if any)?
  • Where will mom *sit with* on courses that need one-on-one time?
  • Where will a tutor work, if needed?
  • Who needs privacy and space?

The *How* of planning homeschool high school

The *How* refers to record keeping: How are you tracking your homeschool high school credits?

There’s not ONE right way to keep records, of course! Here are some ideas:

  • Sabrina uses plastic file box for ongoing projects and ungraded papers. She moves completed papers and projects to a master portfolio.
  • Vicki uses yearly portfolios to keep important papers, tests, log sheets for credits, certificates, etc.

Important records we recommend keeping include:

The *Why* of planning homeschool high school

If you don’t know WHY your are homeschooling high school, you shouldn’t be planning! Clarify your WHY! Here some of our WHYs:

God is leading in this direction and we have weighed the costs and are ready for the sacrifices. (At least as far as we can know at the time. The rest is trust in God.) Carefully and prayerfully examine your WHY so that you will have confidence in God’s direction.

WHY shouldn’t be: I want to have perfect kids. As our friends the Fletchers, of Homeschooling In Real Life, say: God is in charge of the outcome, not us!

We have found that homeschool high school years are the best years yet!  Go and be empowered after you enjoy this discussion with Sabrina and Vicki.

Your teens will enjoy 7SistersHomeschool.com’s curriculum. We share the curriculum that we’ve designed and homeschool high schoolers have vetted for years. It is NO-busywork, adaptable to varying interest levels and abilities. We aim for teens to LIKE what they study in homeschool high school!


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

This week on HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring.

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring. Soft skills are necessary for success during high school and after graduation for homeschool high schoolers. Here are tips for helping teens grow the soft skill of integrity. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #SoftSkillsForTeens #Skills101

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

Vicki is joined for this interview by Lisa Nehring (of Skills 101/Life Skills for a Digital Age podcast, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network). Lisa is a 27 year veteran of homeschooling. She also owns True North Academy, a gentle Classical and Charlotte Mason approach in an online school for homeschool high schoolers that meets various needs. Lisa’s gift is helping teens develop the soft skills they need for success in life. (That’s why she started her podcast.)

Soft skills are the skills that are related to emotional and social intelligence:

  • Kindness
  • Integrity
  • Honesty
  • Politeness
  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Courage
  • Good work ethic
  • Grit (Angela Duckworth wrote a great book on grit.) Find grit goals, find something challenging and work it for several years.

Soft skills are important to develop because they are key qualities that many employers are looking for these days. Many employers have found that soft skills expertise leads to more success than simply having excellent training in the career field. Take a look at this post about what Google found about success and soft skills in its employees.

With soft skills in mind, Lisa and Vicki are discussing integrity in this podcast episode. The word *integrity* comes from the root *integer*, which means *wholeness*. Thus, integrity means being the same person the whole time. Lisa says: The person you are in your grandmother’s house, you should be all the time.

The person you are at your grandmother's house, you should be all the time. Lisa Nehring's advice about developing the soft skill of integrity. Homeschool HighSchool Podcast.

The Bible speaks about integrity in Proverbs 11:3:

The integrity of the upright guides them; but the unfaithful are destroyed by their duplicity. (Note: duplicity means *deceitfulness*…NOT being the same in all circumstances.)

How do you go about developing integrity skills in your teens?

Model integrity for your family:

  • Live out the idea that honesty is always appropriate
  • If you make a promise, keep it (as much as is possible)
    • Develop plans that help you follow through
  • Know your limits, say *no* when you need to
    • Don’t placate, when something can’t happen, be honest about it
  • Swim in your own lane, take care of your own business
  • Have the courage to set goals and work toward them
  • Live a lifestyle of gratitude
  • Live out your faith in practical ways
    • Show compassion and concern for others by investing in them, for instance:
      • friends
      • family
      • fellow Christians around the world
  • Humility (be honest and transparent with the things we need help with)
    • In other words, ask for help when you need it.

In developing integrity, realistically dealing with the digital world is vital.

  • We need to be the same person online as we are offline. This is an important topic to discuss with teens. If you need some help discussing appropriately *being real* with your homeschool high schoolers, visit our social media expert/friend, Leah Nieman.
  • At the same time, we (and our teens) need to beware of social media envy: what others are presenting on social media may not be the whole story. Lisa tells the story of when she showed pictures of her 4 little grape vines and her friends thought she had an orchard. She wasn’t intentionally being deceiving, it’s just that social media can’t really show ALL of life!

Help your teens in developing integrity by helping them learn wonder and awe.

Lisa tells the integrity story about her grandpa who farmed mint for Wrigley’s gum. He was highly respected in the local community because of his integrity. When he shook your hand it meant he was giving his word… it was going to happen.

We must remember that we can do much to invest in our homeschool high schoolers’ success and soft skills. However, we are not in charge of the outcome. God is! We raise our kids with prayer and the best modeling we can do…AND we continually place our kids in His hands.

Join Vicki and Lisa Nehring in our discussion on the soft skill of integrity. Visit Lisa Nehring’s podcast, Soft Skills 101/Life for a Digital Age, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Check out the True North Program and her True North Facebook page.

You’ll also enjoy these posts.

Flexibility and Adaptability: Interview with Vicki Tillman, of Seven Sisters

3 Ways to Help a Teen Think of Others More Than Selves


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

HSHSP Ep 169: How to Handle When You Finish Homeschooling, Interview with Stacey Lane

This week on HSHSP Ep 169: How to Handle When You Finish Homeschooling, Interview with Stacey Lane.

HSHSP Ep 169: How to Handle When You Finish Homeschooling. What do you do when you finish homeschool? God still has plans for you. Here's what to do.

HSHSP Ep 169: How to Handle When You Finish Homeschooling, Interview with Stacey Lane

One of these days, your youngest will graduate from homeschool high school. What happens then you finish homeschool? Does the world come to an end?

Stacey is a long-time homeschool friend who has been active in the homeschool community for years. Her youngest homeschooler

Has now graduated 3 teens from homeschooling (because of his interest in joining the military, her youngest asked to go to a military prep school, so his homeschooling stopped at 8th grade…and there’s not ONE right way to educate your teens). The 2 oldest have graduated from college. Teen number 3 has just graduated homeschooling high school.

NOW Stacey is ending part of her parenting career and getting on with the next part of her life. How can she move on? How does she handle that transition?

Stacey suggests handling when you finish homeschooling like this:

  • Spend a little time honoring what you and your family have accomplished. That means some sort of celebration:
  •  Celebrating the ups and downs of homeschooling
  •  Celebrating surviving all of those ups and downs
  •  Celebrating her years of identity as a homeschool mom
  •  Hold am Omega Moms breakfasts
    • When the last kid graduates, have breakfast with moms and share those highs and lows and hopes for the future
  • Spend a little time deciding how much of the homeschool identity you want to maintain
  • Remember: there’s not ONE right way to be a retired homeschool mom
    • Leave it all behind
    • Stay around and mentor and/or teach (Stacey leans into this choice. She remembers her journey and wants to be around to encourage the next generation. She likes to be with people in their ups and downs. She likes helping them choose curriculum and resources. She likes reminding them that they can do it! AND Stacey gives this WISE advice: You’re called to homeschool, you’re not called to be perfect.

You're called to homeschool, you're not called to be perfect. Stacey Lane Clendaniel

Kym joined in with suggestions for moms when they finish homeschooling:

Vicki joined in with these suggestions:

  • Get other homeschool moms to have a graduation party (a big party, so you don’t have to plan this transitional event alone)
  • Give yourself permission to do some things you’ve been putting off for decades:
    • Vicki loved learning with her kids. Now she’s taking classes online for free. SO: Take a class (lots of free classes on MOOCs like EdX)
  • Explore different volunteer, hobbies or career opportunities. Take it slow. Give yourself time.
  • Allow yourself to explore new visions for yourself
  • Remember: A mom’s mind plans her way but God directs her path.
    • Remember: A mom’s mind plans her way but God directs her path.
  • Start a midlife bucket list of things you’d like to do
  • Remember: God’s not worried about your future!

One of the things Stacey has taken on is helping 7Sisters with various tasks and managing the Facebook Group (join us, we all have such interesting discussions there).

Join Kym, Vicki and Stacey for a rollicking discussion about how to handle when you finish homeschooling. You’ll also love these posts and HSHSP episodes.

HSHSP Ep 87: Help for Homeschool Working Moms with Stacey Lane

HSHSP Ep 70: What Happens When the Last Kid Graduates?

HSHSP Ep 100: What are Some Homeschool Graduates Doing?


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Bridgeway Academy!

Bridgeway Academy was founded in 1989 in response to the need for more freedom in education as well as the protection that accreditation offers for homeschooling families. Since then, more than 30,000 K–12 students, and many charter and brick-and-mortar schools, have made Bridgeway Academy their trusted education partner.

As part of our commitment to personalized homeschooling, we are proud to offer both secular and Christian options for homeschool families, charter schools, state organizations, co-ops, athletic organizations, arts schools, and others who seek flexible education options for their families.

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 169: How to Handle When You Finish Homeschooling, Interview with Stacey Lane

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School.

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School. Life is rarely perfect, most of the time life is simply real. But that can be really discouraging. Here's are our tips for dealing with discouragement in homeschooling high school. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #DealingWithDiscouragement

 

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

There’s no such thing as a Pinterest-perfect life. There’s no such thing as a Pinterest-perfect mom. Not even a homeschool mom, as much as we would like to try!

Everyone of us (even your 7Sisters- who are just like you, only older) have had periods of discouragement. It’s just part of real life! Join Kym and Vicki as they get real about when life gets real and they get real discouraged. AND what they do about it.

 

Having a teenager and being a mom means there are two humans working together on homeschooling high school (or even more humans working on homeschooling high school). Real humans sometimes have times of discouragement. We shouldn’t ignore the feelings, we should acknowledge it and then decide what to do about it.

Kym reminds us the first thing to do when feeling discouragement is: PRAY! When we tell God what our lives are like, we are being real and honest (like the Psalms). Then it is wise to sit and listen, allowing God’s creativity to work in our souls so we find the creativity to handle the discouragement in a positive, helpful way.

Do you feel discouraged even in your prayer? God cares. Talk to him about that. He wants our relationship, our honest relationship. Lean into the discouragement in God’s presence, even if it feels *not good enough*…be real with God!

Go for a walk. This can be one of the best ways to pray! It can also be a great way to allow your creativity to happen or simply allow your brain to rest and notice the beautiful things God has made. Here are some other mindful things you can do.

Do some deep breathing. Allow yourself to breathe in, asking God for help. Then exhale, thanking him for help. The oxygen will lower your stress hormones and help you physically feel calmer. Download Vicki’s freebie guide to deep breathing: Progressive Relaxation.

Tell someone you trust and ask for a *processing session*. Tell them they don’t need to fix it, just listen…and maybe agree: *That’s really hard!*

Practice self-awareness. Vicki talks about examining the 3W’s of life:

Listen to what is going on for your teen. Don’t practice a full frontal attack at what he/she is doing or thinking wrong. Instead, take a walk or drive together and just listen. Then ask them to talk out the process, and ask wha they believe the outcomes will be. Sometimes the teens will recalibrate themselves. However, sometimes, we must allow them to make their own mistakes. (Just like God sometimes does with us.) Then TRUST God to be the healer and redeemer our teen needs and TRUST God’s infinite love for our kids.

Remember: It is better to get out of God’s way and stay where we belong: on our needs in prayer. And get some prayer support from friends you can trust.

Join Vicki and Kym for an encouraging discussion about dealing with discouragement.

You’ll also be blessed by this post:

1 Powerful Tool for Good Relationship with Homeschool Teens

 

 

 


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Bridgeway Academy!

Bridgeway Academy was founded in 1989 in response to the need for more freedom in education as well as the protection that accreditation offers for homeschooling families. Since then, more than 30,000 K–12 students, and many charter and brick-and-mortar schools, have made Bridgeway Academy their trusted education partner.

As part of our commitment to personalized homeschooling, we are proud to offer both secular and Christian options for homeschool families, charter schools, state organizations, co-ops, athletic organizations, arts schools, and others who seek flexible education options for their families.

Click here to learn more!


 

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

HSHSP Ep 167: How I Prepared for Competitive College, Interview with Lauren Patrick

This week on HSHSP Ep 167: How I Prepared for Competitive College, Interview with Lauren Patrick.

HSHSP Ep 167: How I Prepared for Competitive College, Interview with Lauren Patrick. Lauren shares how she developed a rigorous and well-rounded transcript in homeschool high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolTranscript #HomeschoolToCollege #LaurenPatrick

HSHSP Ep 167: How I Prepared for Competitive College, Interview with Lauren Patrick

How can teens prepare for a competitive college? Join Vicki and Lauren Patrick to find out how she prepared for college and was accepted at Mount Holyoke College.

Lauren moved to Texas from England in her sophomore year. Lauren’s mother (our friend, Kat, who gave us interviews on Shakespeare, Research Papers and Homeschooling in Britain) was from Texas but her father is British (he teaches at Oxford University). She has often visited extended family in Texas, so she adjusted easily to the culture and environment in the United States.

Lauren’s family knew she was competitive college material so they began developing a competitive transcript in late middle school (for instance, she took Algebra 1 in eighth grade).

At high school level, developed her strong transcript in several different ways:

  • Lauren leaned into her interest in English literature. She took Dreaming Spires Literature and Writing courses, which are rigorous and helped build her love of the topics.
  • She also took Spanish and many other courses at her community college through their dual-enrollment program. She graduated high school with 36 dual-enrollment credits.
  • Took courses that made her transcript look stronger, even though they were out of her interest. These included courses such as Physics and Calculus.
  • She was active in extracurriculars and built her skill in swimming to become competitive.
  • She developed her entrepreneurship interests through a self-published a children’s book series. She also created and runs an editing and book-formatting service.

How did Lauren make connections with peers and teachers in online courses?

Made sure she took advantage of the ongoing chatbars in the *classrooms*?

How did Lauren make connections with peers and teachers in her dual-enrollment courses?

Wait for professor to finish talking and ask questions.

How did Lauren start her college search process?

  • Created a spread sheet and added colleges of interest.
  • She added: Name of school, population, accept dual credit, location, where exchange students who go to Oxford start out in US (her father’s suggestion), etc
  • Discussed each possible choice with her parents. (Her mother knew her personality and was familiar with some of the colleges she listed.)
  • Discussed with her parents colleges they also added.
  • Toured top choices from the spread sheet during junior year.

She eventually applied to 6 colleges: Trinity University, Southwestern, Hendricks College, Vassar College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College.

How did she narrow the choices?

College tours, special college days.

She loaded her swim times, GPA and SAT scores on the NCSA National College Sports Association website. Through that she was recruited by Mount Holyoke’s swim coach. When she visited she found that “there wasn’t anything I could hate about it”. Then she found that the schools she visited later, didn’t compare to Mt. Holyoke for her. The main decision point was the highest respected college that accepted all her dual credits.

What did Mount Holyoke like her?

  • The swim coach liked her, that she swam the 400 meter, and her SAT scores.
  • The rigor of the courses on her transcript.
  • Her college application essay. (She wrote about an experience she had when she lived in Britain, where she helped lobby for homeschooling. She talked to her Member of Parliament and Prime Minister, David Cameron. She wrote that good leadership is about listening to the people they lead.)

The school gave her a scholarship for her entrepreneurship. (She mentioned in her application she wants an entrepreneurship minor, something her college considers their specialty.)

What tips would Lauren have for homeschool high schoolers?

We’re excited for Lauren’s adventures as she heads off to college at Mount Holyoke. Join her and Vicki for an inspirational chat.

You will also enjoy these posts about homeschool graduates.

Homeschool Highschool Podcast Ep 107: Homeschool Swimmer Goes to Harvard

Homeschool Highschool Podcast Ep 110: What’s it Like to be a Homeschool Senior?

Join our Facebook Page and 7SistersHomeschool Facebook Group for good conversation and encouragement!

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HSHSP Ep 167: How I Prepared for Competitive College, Interview with Lauren Patrick

HSHSP Ep 166: Helping Teens Prepare for Their First Job Interview

This week on HSHSP Ep 166: Helping Teens Prepare for Their First Job Interview.

HSHSP Ep 166: Helping Teens Prepare for Their First Job Interview. Give teens the edge and confidence they need for their first job interviews with these important skills. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #FirstJobInterview #FirstJobHuntSkillsForTeens

HSHSP Ep 166: Helping Teens Prepare for Their First Job Interview

Do you remember your first job interview? Remember how it felt trying to think with a clear mind when you’re SO nervous and feel so inexperienced and unprepared? The entire process of job hunting, followed by harrowing interviews is an important rite of passage for teens. If your teen is just starting out with the job hunt, listen to this HSHSP episode first.

Besides being a 7Sister and homeschool coach, I am a Career Coach. I’ve worked with teens and college students as they’ve searched for their first jobs. Sometimes things go great and sometimes the experience happened for character building 😉

Here are some of the goofy experiences teens have shared with me about their first job interviews:

  • Several of the have gotten lost on their way to the interview, so arrived late or almost late (and thus, flustered).
  • One told me about the crabby person who interviewed him. One of the questions she asked (a standard question for many entry-level jobs) was, “What is your greatest weakest?” His rehearsed answer was, “Sometimes I get nervous but I’ve practiced breathing and grounding skills so I’ve always been able to overcome the feelings.” (I thought that was a pretty good answer, myself.) His interviewer became irritated and asked why he had even applied to the job, if that was so.
  • One told me he realized about halfway through the interview, that his his zipper was down.
  • Some have told me they got stumped by a question and felt flustered.
  • I remember early in my career, interviewing in a Human Resources office where the painting behind the interviewer was hanging dramatically crooked. I never knew whether it was a goofy test (how do I address odd things) or they simply didn’t know. What I did decide was, I can’t work at an organization that can’t straighten paintings on the wall.

What I have learned is that preparation is key!

The key to success for your teen's first job interview: prepare, prepare, prepare.

So how do you go about helping teens prepare for their first job interview?

Help guide your teens, this first time around, with these simple tips:

  • Research the company they are applying with.
  • Most companies have a website.
  • Read the history of the company and find out about the corporate culture.
  • Look for buzzwords, “Respect and helpfulness”. Memorize those buzzwords and drop them into the conversation. In fact, prepare a phrase you can throw in. This shows respect for the company, the interviewer’s time, and your teen’s initiative.
  • Look on Linkedin and see if you can find out about your interviewer.
  • This is not an option most of the time for an entry-level job, but if your teen DOES know who will be interviewing him/her this will be helpful:

Rehearse with your teen, the common, basic, entry-level job interview questions. Have him/her write the answers:

  • Tell us about yourself?
    • Prepare ahead of time an elevator pitch (a statement SO short that you could say it between the first and second floors of an elevator ride). For this elevator pitch have them include some vital things about you and where you’re going and what you would like to do for the company.
  • Why do you want to work for us?
    • Think of something that makes you look interested in the company.
  • What is your greatest strength?
    • Sometimes homeschool high schoolers have a difficult time with this question. They feel like they are bragging or prideful if they truly answer the question. However they are not being braggadocious if they have a strength that will help them in the job. It is simply a strength God has helped them build.
  • What is your greatest weakness?
    • Name a mild weakness and what you are doing. Never give a weakness like this:
      • I argue with my parents a lot.
      • I am sort of lazy.
  • What are your salary expectations?
    • The going rate for this position.
  • How you have handled a failure in life?
    • Pick something that shows your problem solving and bounce-back skills
  • Who has mentored you?
    • Tell a story of someone who has been influential in your life. Give details of the story.
  • Why should we hire you?
    • Say something along this line: I believe I can serve this company and make you glad you hired me.

Now it’s time to rehearse with your homeschool high schooler:

  • Have them get dressed in interview clothes.
    • Interview clothes are clean professional clothes. Shirts with buttons (ties optional for guys but do give an edge in some jobs). Clean, closed-toed shoes.
  • Have them enter the room with magic non-verbals (shoulders back, chin up, Mona Lisa smile), carrying 2 extra copies of resume and a notepad and pen.
  • If this is your teen’s first job, have them prepare an experiential resume. 7SistersHomeschool has an easy how-to guide.
  • Offer them a handshake.
  • Offer them to take a seat. (Teen should then sit down, straight-backed and both feet on floor.)
  • Ask them the above interview questions.
  • At the end, have them say, “Thank you, Mrs. __, for the interview.” Then stand and leave calmly.

For the day of the interview, tell your teen:

  • Know where you’re going (maybe drive there the day before just to make sure).
  • Arrive 15 minutes early.
  • Bring 2 extra copies of their resume.
  • Bring a notepad and pin.
  • Make sure all buttons are buttoned and zippers are zipped.
  • Take a few deep breaths before entering the building.
  • Also stand arms akimbo 15 seconds before entering the building (maybe while still in car).
  • Walk into building and interview room with magic non-verbals.
  • Greet interviewer with a professional (firm) handshake.
  • Stand until interviewers sit down.
  • Use interview non-verbals (back straight, feet on floor).
  • Try not to fidget (or jot a few notes instead of fidgeting).

The job interview isn’t over when the interview is over!

  • After the interview, send an email thank you to the interviewer.

First job interviews are stressful, but necessary to gaining that first job. Give your teens the skills for this important life event by joining Vicki for this chat.

You’ll also be blessed by these posts on Career Exploration:

Discovering Interests and Skills

Discovering Purpose

Discovering Values

Join our Facebook Page and 7SistersHomeschool Facebook Group for good conversation and encouragement!

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HSHSP Ep 166: Helping Teens Prepare for Their First Job Interview

HSHSP Ep 165: Teens and Legalism, Interview with Kendra Fletcher

We’re so excited to have our friend, Kendra Fletcher with us! This week on HSHSP Ep 165: Teens and Legalism, Interview with Kendra Fletcher.

HSHSP Ep 165: Teens and Legalism, Interview with Kendra Fletcher. Kendra discusses the freedom of the Gospel and ways to help teens and parents trust God, not checklists. #KendraFletcher #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #LeavingLegalism #TeensAndLegalism

HSHSP Ep 165: Teens and Legalism, Interview with Kendra Fletcher

Kendra is an influential author, blogger and with her husband, Andy, speaker around the country. Andy and Kendra have hosted Homeschooling IRL on this network. She is the mother of 8, several of them who graduated from traditional homeschool, several in hybrid homeschools and their youngest with special needs. She is also a special friend of ours!

Kendra’s family story is full of God-given inspiration and breath-taking traumas. From her youngest’s nearly-deadly virus when he was an infant, to a daughter’s attack of sepsis after a burst appendix (and even more traumatic events), the Fletchers understand what hardship can look like. Through their experiences, Kendra and Fletch have learned that God is in charge of the process of raising children and in charge of the outcomes!

Kendra Fletcher, photo used by permission

God is in charge of the process AND in charge of the outcomes! No matter how much we might want to control our lives (and slide into the trap of *teens and legalism*), God must be in control.

In this chat with Kym and Vicki, Kendra explains that she has learned:

Even if you have a perfect child for your first born, if you have more than one, you’ll find each one has an autonomous soul and mind. That you never have a child who won’t need God in their lives. You’ll never be the kind of parent who can guarantee and outcome. That’s why we need to keep our hope shifted onto Jesus.

We loved Kendra’s previous book, Lost and Found (if you want to read a GREAT testimony of God’s grace, this is it). Kendra’s latest book is called Leaving Legalism. It fits perfectly into our 7Sisters’ philosophy of homeschooling. We asked her to share some of her thoughts on teens and legalism.

Kendra defines legalism as: Anytime we put our hope in anything other than the simple Gospel of Christ (of Christ’s work on the cross to pay for our sins), we are slipping into legalism.

The truth of the matter is that each one of us is a legalist. No matter what we think about the way we run life and what church we go to, because was are born in sin, our humanity pushes us towards some kind of law.

Kendra encourages us to monitor our *if onlys*. If ONLY I could find a perfect church… If ONLY I could get in the right co-op… If ONLY I had the *right* way to parent…everything would be okay.

Every time you catch an *if only* come back to the Gospel. In fact, daily come back to the Gospel. God is our hope. Ultimately and always.

Kendra explained that she and Fletch learned about hope shifting (placing their trust in their process, rules or checklists). They started out parenting by wanting the very best for their kids. Homeschooling was one of those *best things*. They started homeschooling because their first child was so bright that she felt he would do best in a home situation.

As they went along, homeschooling became more than an educational choice! In those decades there was the prominent philosophy that homeschooling would save your kids. Parents who did not homeschool were feeding the children to the wolves. She remembers the story she heard from a speaker that sending kids to traditional school settings is like throwing a precious teddy bear into the mud, no matter how often it is washed afterwards, it would still be sullied.

She points out the hope shifting in that philosophy. All of our children are being raised by parents who are sinners (while saved by grace, are still sinning). When parents were taught to put their hope in homeschooling, that was shifting hope away from Christ’s work in the Gospel and onto our own works. The legalistic idea there is: IF I parent in this way, I’ll get the outcome I want for my kids.

Kendra wrote the Leaving Legalism because a number of parents had come to her points because they felt devastated when they *did all the right things* but their young adults walked away. These parents, like all of us, are not able to control the outcome of another person’s life. God is in charge of the outcome.

So how do we keep ourselves from hope shifting onto homeschooling and away from God? How do we keep our faith and trust in God? If we give up legalism, how do we prevent our teens from falling into licentiousness?

After all the traumas, the Fletchers discovered that the comfort of living in a *checklist*, legalistic culture is a kind of pride and fear. It was toxic to their family. They left their legalistic church when she was 40 years old. She found that she had more freedom and spiritual growth when she gave up control of her own spiritual health and her family’s spiritual health to God.

Kendra advises: Sit as Jesus’ feet. Learn to abide. It’s in many ways harder than simply *having a checklist* but the freedom to let God manage our lives is so much better. The freedom of living with daily hope in the Gospel is a better choice for each person and their families. Kendra has learned to pointing her kids to Jesus: “Look, here’s Jesus!”

He is who we need. His outcomes for us and our kids are what we truly want.

WE can’t raise our kids to be perfect. It is God who is present in their lives as they make their good and bad decisions. The Gospel is the tool to help our teens learn to live trusting in Him.

Kendra’s new book, Leaving Legalism, is her encouragement to Christians who want to start live over. Often families who come out of a legalistic culture leave everything behind: All their social, spiritual and emotional support. The book offers comfort, support and advice for leaving legalism but not leave Christ behind.

Learn to love God, learn to love others, learn to love yourself. Here’s Jesus. He’ll help you with that.

Leaving Legalism: Learning to Love God, Others and Yourself Again by Kendra Fletcher discusses these important topics.

  • Why and how people leave legalism
  • Why rules make us feel safe
  • Understanding the swinging pendulum
  • Our identity in Christ
  • How to let go of the past
  • Apologizing to your teens
  • God’s individual love for each individual

It’s an easy read and not too long, but life changing. Get a copy for you and a friend. Also, contact Kendra at KendraFletcher.com, Facebook, Instagram.

Join Kendra, Kym and Vicki for this inspirational chat!

You’ll also love these posts:

At Least 5 Reasons We Need the Holy Spirit in Our Homeschools

What Does a Teen Need Most from Homeschool High School?

 

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HSHSP Ep 165: Teens and Legalism, Interview with Kendra Fletcher

HSHSP Ep 164: How and Why to Use Literature Study Guides

This week on HSHSP Ep 164: How and Why to Use Literature Study Guides.

HSHSP Ep 164: How and Why to Use Literature Study Guides. Enrich but don't bore: Literature can be fun and meaningful for the whole family with wise use of Literature Study Guides from 7SistersHomeschool.com #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolLiterature #HomeschoolLanguageArts #LiteratureStudyGuides

HSHSP Ep 164: How and Why to Use Literature Study Guides

Sabrina and Vicki LOVE Literature! In this episode we are recording in Vicki’s office, not very fancy for recording: just a chair draped with a blanket for best sound production! We homeschool moms are often making do with what we have! That’s why we know this wise saying from Vicki: Motherhood is the necessity of invention.

Motherhood is the necessity of invention. Vicki Tillman reminds us to be flexible and adaptable in our homeschooling! #HomeschoolHighschoolPodcast

Why use Literature Study Guides?

Teens often need a little bit of coaching or guidance to get the most out of a book. And we need some wisdom on how to give them that coaching without killing the book! That’s how 7SistersHomeschool.com got started creating Literature Study Guides for our teens and for co-op and group classes. Our guides have been vetted by homeschooling teens and moms who love books and those who don’t love books because: You can be successful as a homeschool mom, even if you don’t love books!

Rather than bore teens with basic rehearsing the information in a book, good literature study guides can help teens build good thinking skills. Good high school Literature Study Guides give a few comprehension (just the facts) question but concentrate on inferential questions and teaching a limited number of literature themes.

However, younger homeschooler are not developmentally ready for inferential thinking. So, we 7Sisters found a way to create Literature Activity Guides for Elementary Readers!

We also have a few Literature Study Guides Guides for late Elementary Readers.

We have introduced a few Middle School Literature Study Guides.

Some high school level books have so much happening in story and character that lots of comprehension and concrete learning must happen.

  • Two of these books we recommend are:
    • Chuck Colson’s Born Again. Mostly comprehension. It is such a big, complicated book. Concentrating on the facts helps teens get the most out of this important political/historical biography. 7Sisters Literature Guide for Born Again helps teens keep track of time, events and characters.
    •  The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom. Mostly comprehension so that teens can keep track of character, events and timeline. There is also a *sum-it-up-process activity* toward the end of the guide.

Most high school level books should develop inferential (deeper thinking, implied information) skills.

  • The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis is a great example. While most people have read The Chronicles of Narnia in late elementary or middle school, teens need to revisit Narnia. Lewis reminds us that, “A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.”
  • Adolescents are developmentally ready to deal with the symbolism, theology, and philosophy that Lewis embedded in each scene of each book.
    • For instance, The Silver Chair draws heavily on Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. This book is a book about the nature of reality, the development of character, and the necessary choice of believing.
    • Or in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, teens learn the concept of *sehnsucht* (the longing for heaven, for things they don’t know yet) that is deeply embedded throughout the book. Our teens have LOVED the revisit to Narnia!

Don't kill the book. Teaching too many literature concepts at once trashes a teen's love of reading. Try 7SistersHomeschool.com's Literature Study Guides for concise, interesting, meaningful Literature Learning. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HighSchoolLiterature #LiteratureStudyGuides #HomeschoolHighschoolPodcast

Most of the other high school level Literature Study Guides concentrate on one or two literary concepts (character arc, foreshadowing, theme, plotline, etc) so that teens don’t loose the love of the book by overdoing the teaching. We want teens to love to think deeply and love reading. You can’t do that by killing the book with too many questions or concepts so we keep the guides short and adaptable to interest and ability levels and personal goals.

How to Use Literature Study Guides for Homeschool High School

Now onto some ideas for using 7Sisters Literature Study Guides. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • We recommend using Literature Study Guides every single year but not for every single book. We recommend a rule of thumb of one study guide per month for an average teen. Two or more guides per month are good for college-bound teens.
  • Each 7Sisters high school Literature Study Guide includes suggestions for ways to complete the guide at an Average, College Prep, Advanced or Honors level of rigor. Choose the level of rigor a teen wants or needs. Get your teen involved in the decision!
  • You might find that some books are so interesting that your homeschool high schooler might enjoy working on an Honors level for that Study Guide. Some books may be more intense and even an Honors-level teen might complete some study guides at Average or College-Prep levels.
  • Also choose the number of Literature Study Guides based on the length of the book itself. Some books (such as Les Miserables– even the abridged version) are quite long. Do fewer long books and mix in shorter books like God’s Smuggler.
  • Don’t wait until senior year and cram all your guides in! Do some each year!
  • Remember to be flexible! There’s not ONE right way to homeschool. Some years, monthly study guides might be too much. Some years you need many study guides.

Want some more help with how and why to use Literature Study Guides?

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Want some homeschool high school mom community?

HSHSP Ep 164: How and Why to Use Literature Study Guides

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School.

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School. Discussion of the different homeschooling methods for high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolHighschool

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

Sometimes we get questions about the 7SistersHomeschool.com’s philosophy of homeschooling. What is our educational philosophy? Wait for it…

Let’s start with these 2 vital concepts!

If you’ve known Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for any time at all (or our Sisters, Marilyn, Allison and Sara), you know our most important educational philosophy concept: There’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school!

There’s the right way for your child, for this year; for your family, for right now. But needs, goals and interests change. So that leads to a second educational philosophy concept: We have to be flexible if we want a healthy homeschool high school!

Now, let’s look at the different philosophies of homeschooling high school on an *educational philosophy continuum*.

What are the influential philosophies in homeschooling high school? There are a number of educational philosophies, so it helps to visualize them on a continuum from highly structured and rigid to and free-formed and flexible.

The truth is that in practice, most of us homeschooling parents really are *eclectic*. While we might like a certain philosophy, we usually find that in real life we need to mix and match.

  • We might need a teen to take a college class (highly structured) or an online class (usually highly structured)
  • We might want to take some Charlotte Mason approach classes through online programs like Dreaming Spires Home Learning (listen to our friend Kat’s discussions with Vicki about writing research papers, teaching Shakespeare and homeschooling in Britain).
  • We might find that our co-op classes lean toward the Classical model.
  • We might give our teens time each week to explore their own interests and have them log hours to earn an elective or Career Exploration credit.

These are all great ways to homeschool high school with an eclectic educational philosophy.

Back to the continuum: Different homeschool high school educational philosophies live on a continuum from rigid to flexible. Here are a few examples (remembering that there’s not a right or wrong way to homeschool high school).

On the highly-structured end of the continuum there’s School at Home

School at Home is a format that follows a set program (like Keystone or K12), with online classes similar to a classroom format. We sometimes call this *school in a box*.

Good thing: This is a great format for teens who love structure and following formats and rules.

Pitfall: Teens who don’t like lots of structure, or being slowed down by a *classroom setting*, will wrestle with boredom.

Also structured is Classical Education

One concept behind Classical Education is creating an infrastructure of learning. The Classical model of the comes from the ancient philosophers like Aristotle and Socrates and became the standard educational model of the Middle Ages. In Classical education, Latin is the foundation of all education and follows the structure of first learning Latin Grammar, then Rhetoric, then Logic.

Good thing: Homeschoolers who love Latin and critical thinking will LOVE Classical education. It really is a format that develops thinking minds.

Pitfall: For teens who are not linear thinkers (ADHD, creative thinkers), this model might be tougher.

Less structured is Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason’s educational format is based on reading, narrative, writing, beauty, observation and experience. It is a real-book and real-experience type of program. Usually the high-school level course have lots of rigor in the writing and reading components at the minimum.

Good thing: Teens learn to appreciate and notice beauty and become articulate in their communication styles.

Pitfall: For teens who do poorly with dictation and narration, they might feel lost.

Moderately structured is Goal-Driven Homeschooling

This is 7SistersHomeschool.com’s model (although we don’t believe in getting ulcers over anything formattish). When teens learn goal setting in high school, they have an important tool for success. They will need to be able to set goals through college, career, and life in general!

We believe that homeschooling high schoolers benefit by learning to set goals, so we work alongside our teens to help them set 2 types of goals:

Long term goals: What we want for them (and what they want for themselves) by the time they graduate- what kind of person do they want to become and life preparation do they need?

Short term goals: What we need to accomplish each year in order to meet those long-term goals.

Good thing: What our teens like about goal-driven education is that they know where they are going. What do they need for graduation? Career preparation? College preparation? Life-skills preparation? On the other hand, what if teens don’t learn to set goals? It’s like when you get in your car and start driving but don’t know where you’re going, you end up somewhere you don’t know…

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to goal setting might begin to feel pressured by the goals. Remember to be flexible, not perfectionistic.

NOTE: We also have a firm philosophy that homeschool high school curriculum should include no-busywork and be adaptable to different levels of rigor. Here’s a post explaining our curriculum philosophy.

Relaxed Homeschooling, Lifeschooling, Unschooling are on the far-end of the relaxed side of the continuum.

These are the educational philosophies on the relaxed end of the spectrum. The homeschooling high schooler chooses an interest and explores it in an in-depth, student-directed, delight-driven manner. There is not a structure. The idea is that if a teen is busy exploring a gift or interest, education will be an automatic outgrowth of the experience.

Good thing: These teens tend to be all-in, really invested in their interests. They know how to become subject matter experts in their giftings.

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to structure must learn to fit themselves into the box when they get their first jobs, or find a career that fits their learning style.

To wrap things up, here are some words of wisdom and advice:

  • When you think about what your family actually needs, you’ll probably find that you have needs for a bit of several of these styles.
  • No matter which way you homeschool, God is in charge of the outcome. Not you, God is in charge of the outcome. (Our fellow podcasters, Fletch and Kendra of Homeschooling in Real Life, often say this and they are correct.)
  • As our Sister Kym always says: Pray first, last and always.
  • If your homeschool high school philosophy is prayer oriented, your homeschool program is on the right track.
  • No matter what you plan, God might have another idea. Remember: A mom’s mind plans her way but God directs her path.

REMEMBER, there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school. Be happy with what fits your family best! And your teens best! And be ready to trash your method (or curriculum) anytime it is not working for you. We have so many choices!

Here’s a fun episode from our friend Melanie Wilson of Homeschool Sanity Podcast. It’s her Top 40 episodes and you’ll find information there to help empower you for homeschooling success.

Want some more information on Goal Setting?

5 Easy and Important Steps to Goal Setting for Homeschool High School

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PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

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HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School