HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

This week on HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck.

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck. Informative Career Exploration interview with ideas for homeschool moms to help teens make realistic choices. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolCareerExploration #CareerCoachingIdeasForTeens #HomeschoolHighSchool

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

As many homeschool families know by now, 7Sister Vicki LOVES career exploration. She is joined today by Jamie Beck a homeschooling mom and career coach in California.

Jamie homeschools her 12 year old through a charter school in California. She also has an elementary-aged son in traditional school, which shows that there’s not ONE right way to homeschool…even if it is in a traditional school setting 😉

Jamie decided to homeschool and started teaching Career Education when her daughter was 2 and a half year old. She started by creating a children’s book, which did not do financially well. She felt it was a failure but she used the failure, not as defeat, but to give herself impetus to develop a Career Exploration program for young people. (See links at the end of the post.)

Jamie’s top piece of advice is to tweak how you teach your kids to talk about careers. Teach them to say:

  • “When I grow up I want to work with…” rather than “When I grow up I want to be a… ”
    • Children are conditioned by society to think that career is identity. Jamie feels this limits their options and creative thinking about career. “Working with” keeps options and creativity open.

She wants young people to explore LOTS of careers: Aou can never have a career you don’t know exists.

  • She teaches 5 jobs a day from childhood. She does this informally, through conversation and exposure to different careers.

For Career Exploration Jamie recommends that homeschooling parents help their homeschool high schoolers to be:

  • Involved in interests, at home and in classes or interest groups
  • Explore different practical skills (hands-on and other life skills)
  • Learn networking skills (Download Vicki’s Confidence for Meeting New People Skills freebie)
  • Learn advocacy skills (how to ask for what you want or need)
  • Learn financial and business skills (oh my, don’t miss this! Download 7Sisters popular Financial Literacy course)
  • Teaching teaching experiences, give them experiences in training younger siblings, friends, classes (think preschool at church)
  • Join various groups. (Jamie’s daughter is active in drama and 4H)
  • Volunteer with various career interests
  • Shadow and interview people in various careers
  • Discuss why teens are interested in various careers. Ie, if it is an interest in being a doctor, as you explore you might find that they hate blood but they like to help people. Maybe other helping professions like counseling will help.
  • Build an experiential resume starting 8th or 9th grade. Keep it ongoing. Download 7Sisters How to Write an Experiential Resume and keep it going.
  • Have LOTS of experiences!!
    • Experiences are truly one of the best ways to weed out or strengthen career interests. Jamie tells the story of her daughter wanting to be an archeologist until she spent the day with a group digging for sharks’ teeth. After a day of 101 degree heat, her daughter eliminated that career choice.

Jamie is now a career coach who speaks in libraries doing workshops in libraries. She also gives Brain Sorting Assessment, it helps them sort out their TRUE interests from what they randomly think their interests might be. The Brain Sort asks things like:

  • What’s on internet browser history
  • If they say they want to be an engineer, but they never explore STEM information. It makes you interested?
  • What are the various interests about the setting, skills, training of careers of interest
  • Where would you donate a million dollars?
  • What does that tells your teen?
  • What do you save up money for?
  • What do you buy?
  • What do you collect?
  • What are your habits?

Jamie says: Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job.

Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job. Teens are going to be working and sleeping for 50 years, so they need an amazing mattress and an amazing job- Jamie Beck during interview on Homeschool Highschool Podcast. How parents can be career coaches for their teens' Career Exploration program.

Vicki was so excited to talk to Jamie because of their shared love of Career Exploration. Jamie’s passion for helping teens understand themselves and truly explore best-fits is a hallmark of a true Career Coach.

As you know, 7SistersHomeschool.com has lots of articles on Career Exploration for homeschool highschoolers as well as our popular Career Exploration course.

To find Jamie, CareerVisionByJamie.com. Check out her resources and her Brain Sort. She helps match teens and colleges. She also hosts Career Vision Minute on Facebook.

HSHSP Ep 179: Career Coaching with Homeschool High Schoolers, Interview with Jamie Beck

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

This week on HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman.

HSHSP Ep 178: What's Good and Bad about Tech for Teens. Interview with Leah Nieman. Tools for parents for keeping teens safe and providing teens with great educational resources. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolAndTechnology #SafeDigialWorld #GreatEducationalTools #LeahNieman

 

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

Many of us homeschool moms are *digital immigrants*, we were around in the days before the internet and always feel like we are a step behind our kids in the things going on in the digital world. Our kids, on the other hand, are *digital natives* and tend to be very comfortable there. We moms worry about the safety of our children and teens when they are online.

That’s why I asked our friend and fellow homeschool mom, Leah Nieman (our favorite technology expert) to join us for a realistic discussion about the world of technology for those of us homeschool moms who are not experts ourselves. She shares with us what’s good and bad about tech for teens.

Leah Nieman

Leah Nieman. Photo used with permission.

The key issues that parents need to know about the online world include:

  • Privacy
  • Education of parents
    • Leah reminds us that where the parents are the teens don’t want to go. When parents are on Facebook, kids go to Instagram, then Snapchat, etc. So we need to stay up to date on information and maintain open communication with our homeschool high schoolers (and youngers).
  • Education of teens
    • Appropriate behavior in online classrooms,
    • Appropriate behavior and company outside the classroom
  • Safety on social platforms

What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens: Social Apps

It’s easy to read bad reports on the internet about social apps that only cover bad news. However, we don’t have to go to extremes and keep our homeschoolers off all social media. Rather, we need to be discerning and wise. When our young people come to us and want to download a new app, do some research and discuss what you find with them.

Parents should research:

  • What are the privacy settings. Can I limit who sees my child’s information?
  • Can I block and eliminate this app if it proves to be a poor choice?
  • Is my child’s location private?
  • Is the app targeted to kids but has *content buckets* (content buckets are sections of the app for different ages, children in one bucket, adults in another bucket). Can adults jump out of their content bucket into your kid’s bucket?
    • An example: Some apps have 2 content buckets. It’s easy for adults to get out of their bucket into the younger people’s bucket. This raises safety concerns because a young person may take at face value that a person is who they say they are. Vicki, in her job as mental health counselor has worked with young teens who thought they were talking with a peer on a social app but found out the hard way they were dealing with a predator.

Parents should keep conversations going:

When we parents are uneducated or overwhelmed we often want to stop the conversation about technology. However, we need to watch out when conversation stops! Kids get their information from peers if it doesn’t come from parents. Although we are uncomfortable we need to lean into uncomfortable topics by:

  • Being curious, ask questions
    • What do you like about it?
    • What is the draw for you?
  • Listening and allowing your kids to educate you. (Also, do your own research at LeahNieman.com)
    • Understand first, then ask questions.
  • Being open about your feelings, listen and be educated
  • Any topic we avoid is an open entry for danger

Some social apps that middle school and high schoolers use (don’t forget, mom, stay in the conversation with your homeschoolers about social apps:

  • Snapchat
  • Yubo (known as tender for teens). Here’s Leah’s informative post on Yubo.
  • Live.ly Live.me
    • These are for live streaming and live broadcasting
      • Live streaming: Like Facebook Lives, a person presents a topic. It is not spontaneous.
      • Live broadcasting is about connecting with peers, it is done in a stream of consciousness fashion, the intent is to connect, to create a social event. This can be a concern: who are your teens connecting with? Teens issue challenges like: Hey, do a dance, sing a song… and that is broadcast to the community. This can put a teen in a vulnerable position because of their lack of experience, discernment and natural impulsivity. Live broadcasting is popular with teens because they are targeted to teens, appeal to teens by connecting them. )
  • Tiktok is a top-ten download in Apple store. It was formerly called Music.ly.
    • Tiktok hass big draw for young kids (guidelines are supposed to be age 13 but many younger kids are on the app).
    • Young people create little videos and skits to music that is provided daily in a challenge. Kids like it because it has interactive community.
    • The concern for parents is the privacy. Adults  (strangers) are present on Tiktok. They can direct message your kids and share out onto other platforms.
    • Kids can create own accounts without parents knowing. They usually don’t know how to set privacy settings.
    • Leah talks about about setting up test account and is immediately asked for follows by young children who are yielding to pressure to grow their audience.

How do you keep kids safe:

The digital world is not all terrifying. There are great apps that are great tools for education. LeahNieman.com provides lots or information on great tools for homeschool families.

The digital world is not all terrifying. There are great apps that are great tools for education. We call it *gamified learning*. Check out Leah’s blog series with LOTS of great educational apps.

Some apps are good for tacking educational progress:

It’s a low pressure way to build skills, remediate and track progress. For example:

  • Spelling apps
  • Coding apps

Some apps are productivity apps.

  • As families with high schoolers, we can benefit with having a coordinated calendar app.
  • Project apps. Break down projects and progress through them.
    • When homeschool high schoolers learn productivity with an app, they can take that skill to college.
    • Leah loves using these apps herself. Google One-note to import her research and break down tasks. Then she puts the tasks on Google Task. She has a whole list of cool organization apps for teens.
    • Companies use Trello and Asana. Teens can benefit from learning how to use these as a resume builder. Team building experience and communication skills building. Digital soft skill building.
    • When information and tasks are gamified or made visually available, they progress better.

Check out this series on real-life, practical apps for homeschool families.

Leah also discussed the popularity of online games for teens. Leah likes online gaming. Here are her guidelines:

  • Know who they are playing with (just like you would never just drop teens off to an activity without knowing anything about it or who they will be with)
  • Make sure the gaming environment is safe.
  • Supervision and guidance is important. In other words, don’t avoid the conversations. Be curious, listen, the guide for safety. Kids like to talk about their online friendships, if we keep the communication doors open. We parents need to be interested and approachable so they feel free to talk.
  • Keep the balanced lifestyle. They need sunshine and exercises as much as they need their games. They need to do their lessons and do their activities of daily living (eating, chores, self-care). This is the modern version of teens only wanting to watch television all day long back in the 1970s.
  • Gaming is a good way to connect with their friends, they are genuinely interacting and helping each other. Digital soft skills development as individuals and teamwork.

Join Vicki and Leah for this enlightening discussion of what’s good and bad about tech for teens.

Visit Leah at:

LeahNieman.com (Sign up for Leah’s newsletter there and get a free set of conversation-starter questions.)

Facebook (lots of up to date information, current issues)

Youtube (SOOO much good information!)

You’ll also love our friend, Meryl’s podcast right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network: Homeschooling with Technology!

HSHSP Ep 178: What’s Good and Bad about Tech for Teens, Interview with Leah Nieman

HSHSP Ep 177: Becoming a Mompreneur, Interview with Cheryl Pitt

This week on HSHSP Ep 177: Becoming a Mompreneur, Interview with Cheryl Pitt.

HSHSP Ep 177: Becoming a Mompreneur, Interview with Cheryl Pitt. Homeschooling and family business go well together. Join us for this encouraging interview on becoming a mompreneur, with Cheryl Pitt of 2 to 1 Conference. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #2to1Conf #Mompreneur #HomeschoolFamilyBusiness #MomEntrepreneur

 

HSHSP Ep 177: Becoming a Mompreneur, Interview with Cheryl Pitt

Homeschooling and family business go well together. Join Vicki and Kym for this encouraging interview on becoming a mompreneur, with Cheryl Pitt of 2 to 1 Conference. We are so excited that on this episode we have the opportunity to interview our good friend, Cheryl Pitt! Cheryl is a true mom entrepreneur: a Mompreneur!

Cheryl is a homeschool mom and serial entrepreneur. She and her husband have 4 kids ages 23-4. She and her husband also raised his youngest brothers and are caregivers for their grandfather.

Cheryl has had to make lots of adjustments while being a business woman, wife, caregiver and homeschool mom. One of her priorities has always been her family’s homeschooling. She prioritizes watching her kids to understand their strengths, interests and needs. For instance:

  • Her oldest liked checklists and workbooks
  • Her husband brother (the older one) liked checklists and workbooks, also
  • His youngest brother had ADHD and auditory processing issues, so his homeschooling needs were completely different
  • With her younger set of kids, Cheryl has noticed:
  • Her 11 year old has some auditory processing issues but is very creative
  • Her young daughter is very creative but is a perfectionist
  • Her 4 year old is a tactile learner and quite busy

What is Cheryl’s advice for helping teens find their strengths and interests towards their future careers?

Hold onto the freedom of sticking to the way God created your children! Don’t try to restrict them OR to plan their future for them.

  • Leverage their interests, gifts and skills.
  • Let them explore on their own.
  • When doing career exploration, do a LOT of exploring. Some kids come out of the womb knowing what they want to do, but most don’t .
  • We never outgrow growing, even as moms. Kids don’t know their whole futures, it takes exploring!
    • Cheryl and her husband have a security business. Her oldest son explored staying with the family business but after helping out for 5 years, he went into farming. That was the right fit for him!
    • Need some Career Exploration curriculum to get your homeschool high schoolers started? Download 7SistersHomeschool’s popular Career Exploration Bundle.

Cheryl’s advice for homeschool families that want to make the best of work/life balance while helping kids discover their gifts and interests:

  • Have lots of experiences, not just book education
  • Do as much traveling as you can
  • Give them exposure to people with different interests and disabilities
  • Spend family time whenever the family can be together

Mompreneurs wear lots of hats!Juggle those hats! Choose which hat to drop! None of us can do it all. When monkeys take the hats, find creative ways to get them back...or let the monkeys have them. Cheryl Pitt 2to1 Conference

Speaking of Cheryl’s serial entrepreneurism, Cheryl has so many hats, she reminds us of the children’s book: Caps for Sale. Her hats blow off and she has to catch them and put them back on!

Cheryl is founder and hostess of 2:1 Conference for Christian homeschool mom entrepreneurs: Mompreneurs. (You should come to 2:1 Conference if you are a homeschool mom and business woman or homeschool blogger. Kym, Sabrina and Vicki go every year and love all that they learn and all the friends that they make!)

  • Enterprise Security Systems (helps governmental agencies with security).
  • HS Mompreneur (a subscription box for Christian homeschool mom box of goodies that will bless your heart, your homeschool and your business). Vicki and Kym raved about their sample boxes Cheryl gave out at the last 2:1 Conference: SUCH a cool stapler was in it, besides all kinds of other cool stuff.)
  • Vicki pointed out that Cheryl, while being successful, is not an intimidating presence.
  • She started blogging in 2008, when homeschool journals online. Some bloggers were being to montetize> Cheryl wemnt to Blissdom and she loved it but wanted to offer something like that for her people; the online homeschool mom. The dream grew over time. Worked with close friends. Cherly feels like she’s not an intimidating presence, a reingleader because the conference is God’s.

Cheryl’s advice for upcoming mompreneurs.

  • Watch out for fear! It all boils down to trust. Seek God, if it’s his idea, it will work. It will be hard but it will work!
  • Lay down pride: In business, we are serving people, not just making money, not just running businesses!
  • Take baby steps…and keep on taking baby steps!
  • If you’re faithful with what God gives you, it will grow.
    • But remember: Success is not linear. We don’t start a business and have continuous upward growth.
    • We go forward, hit bumps, adapt, grow, hit lulls, adapt, grow.
    • Growth isn’t the litmus test of success. There are seasons of growth and times of rest. Keep faith

Kym has an analogy that being a mompreneur is like cars driving down road. There are lots of twists and turns, sometimes a bumpy road. But when you can stay on the road, you’ll arrive!

What advice does Cheryl have for mompreneurs with so many hats to  juggle?

  • There’s no such thing as balance. So don’t waste your time trying for perfect balance!
  • Daily prioritization. Prayerfully decide what’s important to do first each day. Remembering you are a:
    • Daughter of Christ
    • Your husband’s wife
    • Your children’s mother
    • Then a business owner
  • Beware of the tyranny of the urgent. Sometimes urgency IS the priority. Prayer will clarify whether urgency is a distraction or the priority!
  • Routines are important to get the day-to-day necessities done.
  • Juggle those hats! Choose which hat to drop! None of us can do it all.
    • When monkeys take the hats, find creative ways to get them back…or let the monkeys have them.
  • Whatever God has put on your heart! Don’t sit on it, start taking baby steps!
  • Life happens, you’ll have challenges. Keep those baby steps going!!

Get in touch with Cheryl at:

For more encouragement, listen to this episode of Homeschool Sanity Podcast with our friend, Melanie Wilson about getting organized. She is the expert, organized mompreneur!

You’ll be so encouraged by this interview with Cheryl Pitt!

HSHSP Ep 177: Becoming a Mompreneur, Interview with Cheryl Pitt

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

This week on HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans.

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans. Make homeschool high school fun and effective with experiential learning. Don't take school so seriously! Have fun! #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HandsOnLearning #ExperientialLearning #HomeschoolHighSchool #SusanEvans

 

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

Do your homeschool high schoolers have days that they HATE their studies? Teens get bored with nothing but textbooks! Join Vicki and our friend, Susan Evans, who reminds us that teens don’t outgrow the need for experiential learning! When they have hands-on experiences, they regain a love for learning.

Susan is an expert on hands-on learning. That’s the way she educates her homeschool high schoolers. Her good-natured teens still love education because Susan comes up with hands-on experiences for their transcript credits.

Susan reminds us that having fun in education, makes education successful. She tells the story of teaching writing in a low-performing school. She did mystery events with her. Then her students wrote mystery stories about the event. The next testing showed her students scored significantly higher on their standardized tests, because they were now engaged and encouraged.

When she started homeschooling her kids, she decided to keep those hands-on learning principles going with her own kids education. She did not give up experiential learning even when her kids reached high school levels. Susan reminds us to bring more joy to your home through hands-on learning!

Bring more joy to your home through hands-on learning!- Susan Evans Listen to this episode of Homeschool Highschool Podcast and get lots of ideas for experiential learning in homeschool high school.

What are some hands-on learning experiences that Susan has used in her homeschool high school?

Need some ideas for experiential learning in your homeschool high school? Susan Evans is an endless fount of hands-on blessings. Remember, don’t take yourselves too seriously. Have lots of fun! You can get inspiration at her YouTube channel and website.

Here are some of Susan’s favorite ideas:

  • Science labs:
    • Animal classification wall. Susan and her family cover a wall poster board diagrammed with kingdoms, phylums, genus, species. Add photos.
    • Potato head genetics: Susan and her teens practice dominant and recessive genes with different kinds of eyes, noses and ears on their Mr. Potato Heads.
  • History:
    • Hold feasts from each location and time period: Susan finds recipes online and in library books. The family works together to cook and present the meal. They eat in period costumes. Then they follow up with period-related activities.
    • Re-enactments: Susan and her family attend Civil War and Revolutionary War re-enactments. National, state and local parks often have interpreters who do some re-enacting.
    • Plays: Susan’s family particularly enjoys Shakespeare plays during the summer when her community holds free “Shakespeare in the Park” events. They also attend other period plays.
    • Visit events and shops: Susan’s family visits antique car shows and antique shops. They learn about period cars, furniture and culture. Nothing can substitute for actually knowing what these things look like!
    • Field trips: Homeschool high schoolers never outgrow field trips. No matter where you live, there are some field trip opportunities. And given time and resources, vacations can turn into larger educational field trips. After all, ALL of life is education! Vicki, Sabrina and Kym have lots of field trip ideas for homeschool high schoolers in this episode of Homechool Highschool Podcast.
    • Parties from each decade of the 20th century: Susan’s family throws Decade parties. Everyone wears costumes and shares food and activities from the decade being studied. (Susan reminds us that right before Halloween, you can find cheap costumes.) An example of a Decade Party: For 70s party: buy a Walmart disco ball, bake a *record cake*, play music of the era with a YouTube 1970’s pop music mix.
  • Literature:
    • Re-enact scenes from family read-alouds: Susan’s homeschool high schoolers re-enact scenes from the famous literature. Her teens especially loved re-enacting their favorite scenes in The Iliad and The Odyssey.
    • Hold mystery partiers after reading mystery novels: Susan started this tradition while teaching in public schools. Her homeschool high schoolers still love reading mysteries then throwing a celebratory mystery party.
    • Have treasure hunts after reading Treasure Island or other pirate novels: Susan loves hiding treasures with clues and maps. Her teens get a kick out of the game.
    • Bible: Susan’s family acts out Bible stories. She says that over time, they have re-enacted the entire Bible!
  • Career Exploration: Practice interviewing. Susan’s homeschool high schoolers have loved 7Sisters Career Exploration curriculum and posts. Here’s a YouTube link to her sons practicing what NOT to do at a job interview.
Susan Evans. Photo used by permission.

Susan Evans. Photo used by permission.

How does a homeschool mom plan and organize hands-on activities for homeschool high school?

Susan says prayer and getting her teens involved are important! Here are her tips:

  • For planning our lessons, Susan suggests starting with prayer when she plans her subjects each year. She believes that God created our creativity, so she expects Him to give her fun ideas…and He does!
  • Give teens job to research, plan and organized hands-on activities.
  • If they drive, they can even Log these hours.
  • Don’t take yourselves too seriously. Relax and have fun!
  • Log hours for all these hands-on activities. These hours go towards leveling-up credits in a way that is fun and memorable.

Join Susan’s Treasure Vault for TONS of ideas for hands-on learning in homeschool high school. Start with encouraging posts at Susan Evans Hands-on Learning. AND catch her YouTube Channel.

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

HSHSP Ep 175: How Teens Can Explore Psychology as College Major

This week on HSHSP Ep 175: How Teens Can Explore Psychology as College Major.

HSHSP Ep 175: How Teens Can Explore Psychology as College Major. How to create career exploration credits in Psychology for homeschool high schoolers who want to explore whether it would be a good career choice. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolCareerExploration #CollegeMajorChoices #PsychologyAsCareerForHomeschoolers

HSHSP Ep 175: How Teens Can Explore Psychology as College Major

Is your homeschool high schooler wrestling with college major choices?

Can I make a suggestion? We need more homeschool high schoolers to choose psychology as a college major. The United States is woefully short on mental health professionals and there is such a great need! Christians are especially needed in the field.

Many parents these days discourage teens from considering psychology as a career. It is one of those professions that usually needs a graduate degree and the pay is never as competitive as the STEM-related careers. US News and World Report reports that mental health counselors achieve an average salary compared to other US careers (median salary of $43,000 whereas in much of the US, the median income is $50,000). However, there are some careers teens can choose, not to become wealthy but because they feel called.

Psychology careers are truly a calling. (Of course, you can say that all careers are a calling. This career, unfortunately, is a career that is often overlooked these days.)

Vicki loves her career as a mental health counselor. She got her degree through Liberty University and has been on staff at Pike Creek Psychological Center for over twenty years. She also serves there as a life and career coach.

How can teens tell if they are called into a career in psychology?

Career Exploration: Psychology. Help your teen who wants to explore psychology as a college major by knowing themselves.

In case your homeschool high schooler would like to explore psychology as a college major, here are some ways to give them some experience that can help them decide (while building a transcript with Career Exploration sparkle).

There are a number of ways to explore psychology as a college major and career choice. Vicki recommends developing career pathways credits in psychology for the homeschool transcript. Here’s a Homeschool Highschool Podcast episode that explains the concept of Career Pathways. 

Take courses in the field of psychology

  • Psychology
    • 7Sisters has a popular etext: Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective. Using our popular no-busywork, level-able format, we cover the basics of psychology that teens will see again in college. This is a fun introduction that teens actually like (compared to many high school psychology textbooks that are long, dull and boring).
  • Human Development
    • Human Development is the study of the way people grow and change from womb to old age. It is a foundation to the study of psychology. 7Sisters etext Human Development from a Christian Worldview, like our Psychology etext, is no-busywork, level-able and fun.
  • Career Exploration
    • Career Exploration is an important branch of psychology. 7Sisters has a comprehensive Career Exploration that gives teens a hands-on look.

Career Pathway activities for logging hours

  • Volunteer work
    • While teens can’t sit in on therapy sessions due to privacy laws, they can help needy people. Volunteer where people need help: Nursing homes, community outreach centers. Seeing people in their ups and downs helps give a feel for the compassion needed to be counselor. Volunteering well requires being with hurting or needy people in a non-judgemental, non-biased way.
    • One of our favorite local volunteer opportunities is Urban Promise.

Go through counseling themselves

  • Many teens experience times of anxiety or sadness. Give them a few sessions of counseling just to see what it is like. It will help!

Experience Life or Career Coaching

  • Gives a close feel to counseling but geared toward goal-setting and achievement. Counseling is about healing. Coaching is about fulfilling. However the the presence and compassion of the life coach is the same as a counselor.

Read books

Check out Vicki’s coaching website

There are so many posts related to emotional intelligence (a topic in psychology). Plus there are freebie downloads such as Personal Discovery Links. SO much fun!

Read about different areas of psychology careers. Check out CareerOneStop.org to read more about these careers:

  • Mental Health Counselor: Masters Degree needed. Counselors are general practitioners. Degrees for counselors include: Masters in Counseling, Community Mental Health, Marriage and Family Therapy.
  • Psychologist: PhD needed. Two common types of psychologists are Counseling Psychologist and Clinical Psychologist.
  • Human Resources: Human Services, Human Resources, start at Bachelors level in agencies or government.
  • Experimental Psychology: Work to help discover best practices in psychology, conduct research.
  • Marketing Experimental Psychology: Works on marketing research.
  • Forensic Psychology: usually at least an MA needed
  • Sports Psychology: at least MA needed. Help athletes achieve peak performance.
  • Organizational Psychology: Work with organizations to make workplace happy and healthy
  • School Counselors (MA), School Psychologist (usually PhD):  Help with practical student needs such as fixing schedules, developing or overseeing IEPs, crisis management
  • Educational Psychologist: PhD needed. Experts testing and evaluations
  • Psychiatrist: MD with Psychology emphasis, dispenses medications.
  • Social Work: MSW. Similar to counseling more community slant in training. In private practices we do the same work.
  • Neuropsychology: MA PhD. Research on the workings of the brain.

For more information on Career Pathways credits in Psychology, check out this post.

If you have a teen who has question about Psychology as a career, have them send them to me. I’d be happy to answer. Vicki@7SistersHomeschool.com

Create a Great Career Pathways Credit for Teens Interested in Psychology

HSHSP Ep 175: How Teens Can Explore Psychology as College Major

HSHSP Ep 174: Teaching About Presidents’ Wives, Interview with Jill Hummer

This week on HSHSP Ep 174: Teaching About Presidents’ Wives, Interview with Jill Hummer.

HSHSP Ep 174: Teaching About Presidents' Wives, Interview with Jill Hummer. Homeschool high schoolers can be inspired and build a terrific transcript American History elective credit when they study the First Ladies. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #JillHummer #HomeschoolAmericanHistory #LessonsAboutFirstLadies #SilverDalePress

HSHSP Ep 174: Teaching About Presidents’ Wives, Interview with Jill Hummer

Homeschool high schoolers can really get some inspiration when they learn about American First Ladies. Our friend, Dr. Jill Hummer, of Wilson College, is a national expert on Presidents’ Wives.

Jill and her husband, Josh, homeschool their family. Josh was homeschooled himself, which makes them a second-generation homeschool family! Jill is also a Political Science professor at Wilson College in Pennsylvania. She is known for her expertise on First Ladies, having been interviewed on History Channel, given lectures on C-Span, and authored an interesting and authoritative book on the topic.

Why should homeschool high schooler learn about First Ladies?

Learning about Presidents’ Wives may inspire a future First Lady (or maybe even a future President)! Learning about Presidents’ Wives can also build a sparkle credit for the homeschool transcript.

Teaching about Presidents’ Wives? Start with some trivia:

  • They had to invent their own job description, there’s no rule book for them
  • Many started out as ordinary wives and mothers
  • Many President’s wives endured hardships in their lifetimes:
    • Elinor Roosevelt was orphaned when young
    • Bess Truman’s father committed suicide
    • Betty Ford’s father died of carbon monoxide poisoning
    • Mary Lincoln lost a child while a First Lady. Other first also lost children at some point.

When teens learn about the hardships that these ladies endured they learn that God hasn’t checked out of the universe, even when things get tough!

Learning about Presidents' Wives may inspire a future First Lady (or maybe even a future President)! Dr. Jill Hummer shares about American First Ladies so that homeschool high schoolers can connect with inspiration and build a powerful transcript.

One thing that homeschool high schoolers can enjoy is this quote by Pat Nixon: Being first lady was the hardest unpaid job in the world.

(Said by Pat Nixon when she flew to represent the United States at the inauguration of the new president of Liberia. She had a 12 hour flight, days of state activity, right on the inaugural podium as a representative of her husband during the ceremony. After the event she sighed and said her famous quote.)

  • First Ladies don’t get compensated (just like us ordinary moms). It is a salary-free job! But they are still expected to represent our nation in many national and international situations.

First Ladies are big influencers. Homeschool high schoolers can learn about Presidents’ Wives to begin thinking about becoming little influencers right where they are. (We can all be an influence for good in some way at each stage of life.)

First Ladies often take leadership in a cause or project while in the office.

Jacqueline Kennedy had the first First Lady project.

  • When Harry Truman did not live in the White House because it was in disrepair. (When they moved into the White House, Margaret’s piano’s leg went through the floor. They quickly found out that the building had to be gutted and rebuilt.) The project ran out of money to finish, so when Mamie Eisenhower gave Jacqueline her tour of the White House on Inauguration Day, Jacqueline was appalled. The repairs were complete but the decor was horrendous. House was decorated only by donations from a New York apartment store. Jacqueline, who was well-studied in American History and Art, made it her project to decorate in a respectful way that represents our history. She even found historic White House furniture that had been stolen or sold. She appointed the first White House curator. What we see when we tour the White House is largely affected by her project.

Lou Hoover may not have thought about this cause before she came to office, but she was faithful to the role that God gave her as a thought-leader.

  • Lou Hoover had a college degree from Stanford University in Geology (one of the first women in the country with a degree in that field), fluent in many languages, helped translate a historic Latin geology text into English. Lou did a great deal to make the White House more welcoming. One of the main duties of First Ladies is to host social events, so Lou’s first social event was to host a tea for Congressional wives. This was 1929, and for the first time in 30 years, an African-American was serving as a United States Representative. Oscar Depriest (Republican, Illinois) had just been elected when Hoover took office. Lou Hoover invited her to one of the 5 teas that she gave for these Congressional wives. Southerners were outraged because Lou had given Jessie equal social standing with the white ladies, and it became a national incident. (The Texas, Georgia, Florida and Mississippi legislatures voted to censure Mrs. Hoover.) This has become known as the DePriest Tea Incident. Lou Hoover paid a price for her courageous leadership but did not regret it.

Jill Hummer became an expert in while a student at University of Virginia. She was a part of the college’s oral history project. She got to hear presidents tell their life stories. She realized then that Presidents’ Wives had little respect for what they do. She realized that they actually had much more influence than textbooks and academians thought. She made that her own project for her PhD studies. That has become her niche.

Jill’s book is First Ladies and American Women: In Politics and the Home

For the homeschool community, Jill and her husband run Silverdale Press.  Take a look at their American History unit studies, especially their popular White House Holidays series.

Join Vicki and Jill for this fascinating interview about Presidents’ Wives. Get more information about the First Ladies with these interviews with Dr. Jill Hummer.
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https://www.c-span.org/video/?444453-1/ladies-womens-history

https://www.history.com/topics/first-ladies/mrs-president-lou-hoover-video

Preview YouTube video Lou Hoover | Mrs. President | History

If your homeschool high schooler would like to earn an entire elective credit learning about Presidents’ Wives for a powerful transcript, you can get how-to create a history elective credit in this post.

AND add some extra sparkle to your American History studies with games! Our friend, Meryl at Homeschooling with Technology podcast has an entire episode on history games!


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 174: Teaching About Presidents’ Wives, Interview with Jill Hummer

HSHSP Ep 173: Career Pathways for Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 173: Career Pathways for Homeschool High School.

HSHSP Ep 173: Career Pathways for Homeschool High School. Career Exploration gets a boost with Career Pathways. Here's how to give your homeschool high schooler a head start on what comes after graduation. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolHighSchool #CareerExploration #CareerPathways #PreparationForLife

HSHSP Ep 173: Career Pathways for Homeschool High School

How do you help your homeschool high schoolers be best prepared for what comes AFTER they graduate?

There are 2 career-related experiences they really should do:

  • Career Exploration: This is a course that helps teens explore their talents, strengths, interests, abilities, experiences and values to help them narrow down career possibilities.
  • Career Pathways: These are the courses that your homeschool high schooler will do that help prepare them for their future careers or college-majors.

Join Vicki and our wonderful guests: 7Sister Marilyn and our friend, Barb Varnell. You know them from our How to Get Started Homeschooling High School suite of episodes:

Barb has also given us great advice on homeschooling high school with intellectually gifted teens. She’s also a PhD chemist, so she and her daughter join Vicki for a fascinating discussion about whether you can be a scientist and a creationist at the same time.

Marilyn and Barb serve the local homeschool umbrella school as academic advisors. (Vicki retired from the academic advisor role there after 18 years.) They help homeschooling high schoolers have a successful high school experience and  prepare for what they’ll do after graduation. They meet several times a year with teens and their parents to set their goals for high school, career and life. An important part of their discussions are about what teens are doing for their Career Exploration until they clarify some goals (as much as a teen can know). Then they help teens develop their Career Pathways goals that will help you prepare for career or college major.

To get started on Career Exploration, check out this comprehensive post on getting started.

  • Log hours doing various *explorations* and a course to earn a credit for the homeschool transcript.

Career Pathways: These are the courses that your homeschool high schooler will do that help prepare them for their future careers or college-major. Build upon good Career Exploration for great transcripts and life-preparation experiences.

Today, we want to discuss, Career Pathways. Homeschool High Schoolers, here’s some great advice:

Insider tip from Barb: For college-bound teens, develop Career Pathways credits, extracurriculars, competitions and service to make you stand out from the crowd. You want colleges to not only like you, but like you enough to give you money to come.

Career-bound AND College-bound teens:

Want some wise advice, Homeschool Graduates? Don't lose your transcript and don't lose your diploma.

Special advice for 9th and 10th graders:

  • Start keeping track of things to put on your experiential resume because you’re going to forget by the time you get to senior year.
  • Think about what they need to be working on for their core academics (if they are interested in STEM but are behind in
  • Explore interests if they have no clue
  • If interested in military, try a quirky language for your World Language credits. That will make they stand out when they meet with recruiters.
  • Find a couple of extracurriculars you can do each year. Colleges often want to see an ability to stick to an interest, project or organization. (Some college applications only ask which extracurriculars you have been involved in for 2 years or more.)
  • Check out CareerOneStop.org and see what the employment outlook for that job (will there be jobs)
  • Take a class outside home when you can. (This gives you a person who can write an academic recommendation.) Barb notes that some colleges want this recommendation needs to come from a teacher at their *school*. One college has asked for a recommendation from an upperclassman English teacher, SO make sure you have explored the college’s requirements not just for entrance but for their major. Barb gives the example of an art student who got lots of scholarship money based on her portfolio
    • Show up to class on time
    • Do the work
    • Have a great attitude

Ninth graders sometimes don’t like to think about all this, so be gracious. By the time they are in 10th grade they really need to do some gentle thinking about the future.

Advice to parents:

Remember to allow your homeschool high schoolers to have TIME to do all this Career Pathways work.

  • Barb and Marilyn have found that sometimes parents avoid Career Pathways involvements for their teens because:
    • They are worried core academics won’t get done
    • They are exhausted and don’t have time or energy to drive their teens all over the place

Want some specific ideas for Career Pathways opportunities?

  • Engineering: Volunteer for an engineering professor
  • Business: Work in family business
  • Auto mechanics: Help in the office
  • Other trades: Talk to the local union, take some community courses, shadow someone in that area.
  • Counseling: Get HIPAA training, do some clerking
  • Pre-vet: Volunteer at non-profit clinics or vet office. Shadow a vet. (Barb’s daughter who is now a vet
  • Music education: Volunteer for a local music education teacher, give lessons, get involved in local college community music programs
  • Medical programs: Volunteer at the local hospital

Want more great ideas for developing your homeschool high schoolers’ Career Pathways credits. Listen to this HSHSP interview with Barb’s daughter, Sarah, who is now a large-animal veterinarian.

Join Vicki, Marilyn and Barb for an informative discussion on Career Pathways!


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 173: Career Pathways for Homeschool High School

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

This week on HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar.

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School. This interview with Peggy Ployhar of SPED Homeschool gives inspiration, encouragement and success tips for parents of special needs teens. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolSpecialNeeds #SpecialNeedsTeens #SPEDHomeschool

 

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

Every teen has a place in God’s kingdom, but not every teen’s journey looks alike. Some homeschool high schoolers have different learning styles, learning differences or learning disabilities. These special needs don’t mean you can’t homeschool your teen for high school. In fact, homeschooling high school might be the VERY best choice for them. You can individualize their education to:

  • Develop their strengths
  • Compensate for their weaknesses
  • Give them skills for life
  • Help them believe in God’s plans for them

Vicki is joined today by Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool to discuss help for special needs in homeschool high school.

Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool

Photo used by permission.

Peggy is a long-time homeschool mom and community leader. Her 2 sons both have special needs so based on her experience with her sons, she jumped into the role of community advisor for families with special needs. That service grew until the need was clear for an organization dedicated to helping special needs families. That’s how SPED Homeschool got started, a dedicated team of homeschooling parents who are:

  • Vetting homeschool curriculum for use with special needs homeschoolers
  • Training other homeschool parents in skills for helping their special needs homeschoolers
  • Reminding parents that there’s not ONE approach that will work for all special needs homeschool high schoolers. Of course, we 7Sisters are excited about that since we’re always saying there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school.
  • Making available advice from experts

Check out SPED Homeschool’s website, and facebook pages.

SPED Homeschool

One of the most important things that Peggy learned about homeschooling high school with her special needs teens was RELATIONSHIP is more important than education. As she kept the relationship with her sons as number one priority, she was able to:

  • Stay flexible, very flexible!
  • Make wise choices for and with her teens
    • curriculum
    • goals
    • resources
  • Create an educational program that adapts as her teens grew and changed
  • Push teens graciously in their giftedness areas

Peggy tells the story of her son telling her at age 16 that he *was done* with high school. She calmed herself and worked with him to quickly set goals for meeting graduation requirements at a minimal (not college-prep) level. He blasted through his courses, took a gap year to explore and became the tech genius behind all SPED’s technology. He eventually went to college, because he felt the calling at that time and did college in his way.

Want more resources? 7Sisters has an Authoritative Guide to Out of the Box Credits for Homeschooling High School with Special Needs Teens

You’ll be SO encouraged by this episode of Homeschool CPA with our friend, Carol Topp, as she shares resources for special needs homeschoolers in co-ops.

Join Vicki and Peggy for this encouraging interview on homeschooling teens with special needs.

Want more ideas on homeschooling high school with special needs teens? Check out this video with Vicki and Peggy.


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School.

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School. Successful homeschool high school years start with planning. Here are steps to build your confidence for homeschooling high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolPlanning #PlanningHomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolSuccess #7SistersHomeschool

HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

Homeschooling high school can feel intimidating before you get started! Vicki remembers when her oldest was in middle school, she was so nervous about homeschool high school that she gathered a group of homeschool moms together to have weekly prayer and resource sharing. The confidence they gained from the process gave them the courage to move forward (and some of them ultimately began co-oping together).

One thing Vicki and the rest of the 7Sisters discovered is that they feel SO much better when they get some solid planning accomplished. Join Sabrina and Vicki for a quick, lively discussion about planning homeschool high school.

Here’s the first and most important thing to know:

There’s not ONE right way to plan your homeschool high school year (or all 4 years of high school).

But if we follow this simple journalism-style framework, it will help! WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY, and HOW!

The *Who* of planning homeschool high school

While this may seem obvious. You’re homeschooling your teens, that’s who! But, as you know, in homeschooling, the entire family is involved or affected. As Sabrina says, “There a multi-dimentionality to homeschooling high school”. Ask yourself

  • Who all will be homeschooling this year?
  • What is each family member’s educational experience?
  • What are their strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are their learning styles?
  • What are their interests?
  • What are the parents’ strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are their teaching styles?
  • What are their interests?

Remember: There's not ONE right way to homeschool high school. High school curriculum and teaching styles should be as individual as your teens and your family.

The *What* of planning homeschool high school

This is the bulk of your planning! Give yourself time to pray and sort this out. Make sure to include your teens in the process. Remember:
There’s not ONE right way to teach the subjects in high school. The joy of homeschooling is teaching in the order and with the curriculum that best suits your family and your teens. Here’s a helpful post with no-fail steps to choosing curriculum.

You’ll also love this encouraging episode of Homeschool Sanity about choosing curriculum.

What do you want to teach this year? There’s not one specific order that you much use to teach History and Language Arts/Literature. There is flexibility in the order of Sciences (although many people teach Biology before Chemistry, often 10th and 11th grades). There is only a little flexibility in the order of Maths (Algebra 1 comes before Algebra 2, unless you use an integrated math).

Here are suggestions for the order of research paper writing during high school.

Here are suggestions for an order of Literature topics for high school.

What curriculum do you like to use? What works for your teens learning styles? Are their curricula that you can’t stand (Vicki has a difficult time with books that have no photos…she needs entertainment! SO even though her teens might be ok with a bland-looking text, Vicki goes for those that include pictures.)

What courses will you need this year for the transcript? These will get priority in your planning.

How much academics can your teens handle. Non-college-bound teens don’t need to do overkills on numbers of courses or levels of rigor. College-bound teens (especially if they are aiming for competitive colleges) will need more courses and more rigor. Be sure to leave unnecessary stuff out but don’t over stress you and teens.

The *When* of planning homeschool high school

There’s totally not ONE right way to handle the homeschool academic schedule. What works best for your family this year?

  • Block scheduling?
  • Year round?
  • 30 week year?
  • 4 day week?

Choose the best schedule to fit your family’s needs. Homeschooling is a lifestyle choice! Ask yourself these questions:

  • Is mom working full time or part time? If so when? Working at home or out of home?
  • Is a family member on shift work? Does the house need to be quiet so dad can sleep on some days?
  • Are you morning people or night owls?
  • What extracurriculars will your homeschool high schoolers be involved in? (How much car schooling will you need to do?)

Sit down with a calendar. Write in the musts. Fit the curriculum around it. (Really…but just make sure it gets done, of course.) Include your teens in the process!

Get some GREAT tips for scheduling in this interview with Melanie Wilson of Homeschool Sanity Podcast!

The *Where* of planning homeschool high school

The location-style of your family’s homeschooling is important in your planning. Remember: There’s not ONE right location for homeschooling high school. Ask yourself these questions:

  • Do you have a dedicated school room? Do you have a dedicated homeschool space? (Vicki and Sabrina both found out that no matter what they planned for *education location*, the entire house was the school room. Their houses are full of bookshelves mixed with other stuff, couches laden with school books, sprawling teens and guitars. That was right for their families!)
  • You MUST remember this: There is NO such thing as a Pinterest-perfect homeschool house!
  • Where are you connecting with other homeschoolers for group learning (online, none, local)?
  • Where are your teens doing internships (if any)?
  • Where will mom *sit with* on courses that need one-on-one time?
  • Where will a tutor work, if needed?
  • Who needs privacy and space?

The *How* of planning homeschool high school

The *How* refers to record keeping: How are you tracking your homeschool high school credits?

There’s not ONE right way to keep records, of course! Here are some ideas:

  • Sabrina uses plastic file box for ongoing projects and ungraded papers. She moves completed papers and projects to a master portfolio.
  • Vicki uses yearly portfolios to keep important papers, tests, log sheets for credits, certificates, etc.

Important records we recommend keeping include:

The *Why* of planning homeschool high school

If you don’t know WHY your are homeschooling high school, you shouldn’t be planning! Clarify your WHY! Here some of our WHYs:

God is leading in this direction and we have weighed the costs and are ready for the sacrifices. (At least as far as we can know at the time. The rest is trust in God.) Carefully and prayerfully examine your WHY so that you will have confidence in God’s direction.

WHY shouldn’t be: I want to have perfect kids. As our friends the Fletchers, of Homeschooling In Real Life, say: God is in charge of the outcome, not us!

We have found that homeschool high school years are the best years yet!  Go and be empowered after you enjoy this discussion with Sabrina and Vicki.

Your teens will enjoy 7SistersHomeschool.com’s curriculum. We share the curriculum that we’ve designed and homeschool high schoolers have vetted for years. It is NO-busywork, adaptable to varying interest levels and abilities. We aim for teens to LIKE what they study in homeschool high school!


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 171: Planning Homeschool High School

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

This week on HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring.

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring. Soft skills are necessary for success during high school and after graduation for homeschool high schoolers. Here are tips for helping teens grow the soft skill of integrity. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #SoftSkillsForTeens #Skills101

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

Vicki is joined for this interview by Lisa Nehring (of Skills 101/Life Skills for a Digital Age podcast, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network). Lisa is a 27 year veteran of homeschooling. She also owns True North Academy, a gentle Classical and Charlotte Mason approach in an online school for homeschool high schoolers that meets various needs. Lisa’s gift is helping teens develop the soft skills they need for success in life. (That’s why she started her podcast.)

Soft skills are the skills that are related to emotional and social intelligence:

  • Kindness
  • Integrity
  • Honesty
  • Politeness
  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Courage
  • Good work ethic
  • Grit (Angela Duckworth wrote a great book on grit.) Find grit goals, find something challenging and work it for several years.

Soft skills are important to develop because they are key qualities that many employers are looking for these days. Many employers have found that soft skills expertise leads to more success than simply having excellent training in the career field. Take a look at this post about what Google found about success and soft skills in its employees.

With soft skills in mind, Lisa and Vicki are discussing integrity in this podcast episode. The word *integrity* comes from the root *integer*, which means *wholeness*. Thus, integrity means being the same person the whole time. Lisa says: The person you are in your grandmother’s house, you should be all the time.

The person you are at your grandmother's house, you should be all the time. Lisa Nehring's advice about developing the soft skill of integrity. Homeschool HighSchool Podcast.

The Bible speaks about integrity in Proverbs 11:3:

The integrity of the upright guides them; but the unfaithful are destroyed by their duplicity. (Note: duplicity means *deceitfulness*…NOT being the same in all circumstances.)

How do you go about developing integrity skills in your teens?

Model integrity for your family:

  • Live out the idea that honesty is always appropriate
  • If you make a promise, keep it (as much as is possible)
    • Develop plans that help you follow through
  • Know your limits, say *no* when you need to
    • Don’t placate, when something can’t happen, be honest about it
  • Swim in your own lane, take care of your own business
  • Have the courage to set goals and work toward them
  • Live a lifestyle of gratitude
  • Live out your faith in practical ways
    • Show compassion and concern for others by investing in them, for instance:
      • friends
      • family
      • fellow Christians around the world
  • Humility (be honest and transparent with the things we need help with)
    • In other words, ask for help when you need it.

In developing integrity, realistically dealing with the digital world is vital.

  • We need to be the same person online as we are offline. This is an important topic to discuss with teens. If you need some help discussing appropriately *being real* with your homeschool high schoolers, visit our social media expert/friend, Leah Nieman.
  • At the same time, we (and our teens) need to beware of social media envy: what others are presenting on social media may not be the whole story. Lisa tells the story of when she showed pictures of her 4 little grape vines and her friends thought she had an orchard. She wasn’t intentionally being deceiving, it’s just that social media can’t really show ALL of life!

Help your teens in developing integrity by helping them learn wonder and awe.

Lisa tells the integrity story about her grandpa who farmed mint for Wrigley’s gum. He was highly respected in the local community because of his integrity. When he shook your hand it meant he was giving his word… it was going to happen.

We must remember that we can do much to invest in our homeschool high schoolers’ success and soft skills. However, we are not in charge of the outcome. God is! We raise our kids with prayer and the best modeling we can do…AND we continually place our kids in His hands.

Join Vicki and Lisa Nehring in our discussion on the soft skill of integrity. Visit Lisa Nehring’s podcast, Soft Skills 101/Life for a Digital Age, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Check out the True North Program and her True North Facebook page.

You’ll also enjoy these posts.

Flexibility and Adaptability: Interview with Vicki Tillman, of Seven Sisters

3 Ways to Help a Teen Think of Others More Than Selves


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring