SAT Changes

What are the SAT changes? Is the SAT going away? In this podcast Jean Burk shares her expertise with all of you! CollegePrepGeniusSAT Changes ~ Episode 90

What are the SAT changes? Is the SAT going away? In this podcast Jean Burk shares her expertise with all of you, and here is the inside scoop! College prep is important.

Visit Jean’s website and online classes at CollegePrepGenius.com

Many changes are coming and this podcast will help you get prepared. Tests typically change every ten years or so, and upcoming this is happening again. There are so many rumors that are not true, and one of them is that the SAT is no longer necessary or any test. This is not true. The SAT, ACT, and CLT are here to stay. Why? Test scores are tied into college ranking so they will be needed and if not these standardized tests, colleges will prepare their own. Students need something more than a transcript to get into college.

The CLT was prepared to be online way before it was needed! They were in place when the pandemic hit and colleges all over the USA took the CLT instead of the ACT and SAT (since they were not testing at that time.)

New SAT changes will come before 2024 and one big change is the length of the test. It will be around two hours long. It will also be available to take online with a secure server and back up. Students, parents, and educators have been assured that the test information will be secure as well as protected. Another change is that the length of time will be longer to answer each test question. Calculators will be allowed when in the past they were banned.

College Prep Genius will be prepared with updates once the new tests are released. There is a caution to believe any test-taking class that claims to have the tests in advance as this is not true.

The PSAT new format will be released in 2023 which is one year earlier than the new SAT changes. This will affect current (2022) high school freshmen. The PSAT is taken when the high school student is in their junior year. This test is one of the main ones used for scholarships.

A small percentage (UC schools in California) have waived the SAT and ACT tests yet are still requiring their own in-house test and charging students to take this test. This is a small number of colleges in the grand total, yet the tests they require are also standardized the only way to level the playing field.

Two types of tests are: School test: based on what was taught and knowledge. Logic Test: based on no particular subject and based on critical thinking.

College Prep Genius claims to help students: beat the test, help in pointing out patterns and rules that the student can learn inside and out to become experts in this area of test-taking with the time to study and prepare. The key is to start practicing early and to trust the system. The test planners have to follow the same patterns and ways to write the tests. The student can learn these patterns.

Keys to Test Taking:

  1. Practice
  2. Start early
  3. Understand the patterns
  4. Prepare
  5. See the right answer
  6. Know why the wrong answer is wrong
  7. Accuracy is more important than speed
  8. Know the test is beatable
  9. Tests are not going away
  10. Tests will be shorter than currently

 

 

 

7th and 8th Grade College Checklist

Is your 7th and 8th grader thinking about college, do you need a college checklist? There is no time like present and there are ways to prepare early, only if you are interested in those scholarship opportunities!7th and 8th Grade College Checklist ~ Episode 89

Is your 7th and 8th grader thinking about college, do you need a college checklist? There is no time like present and there are ways to prepare early, only if you are interested in those scholarship opportunities!

Visit Jean Burk at CollegePrepGenius.com  Jean offers online classes, in-person and live online sessions as well.

Listen to past episodes here on College Checklists:

Ultimate College Checklists Grades 9-10 here.

College Checklists 11-12th grade here.

Creating good study habits is a good way to prepare for college. Does your child have what it takes? Studying takes time and practices like anything else your child does. Study habits and taking good notes is important as well. Setting up your child for success the earlier the better. One of the keys is studying a foreign language, some colleges look for at least four years of study.

College Checklist:

What can you do to prepare (listen to the podcast for details, here is a thumbnail sketch).

  1. Start to think about future careers. (Visit College Ed) a free website.
  2. Read great books. For a list of the top of 100 books, your child should read before college. (GreatSchools.org) Parents be aware some of these books may not be appropriate – so check into them before you assign them to your child.
  3. Work on core subjects, math, reading, and writing. Very important.
  4. Study strong subjects, electives are fine, but be strong on subjects.
  5. Foreign language study.
  6. Take practice tests, ACT, and SAT. Sign up for the website (minimum age is 13 for SAT, younger for ACT).
  7. Sign up for CLT test online – code on the podcast for a deep discount.
  8. Before 9th grade read good books.
  9. Talent searches – some colleges look for young students to give scholarships.
  10. Leadership types of goals.

Starting test prep in middle school takes off the pressure when the children are older. If your child takes their time younger to get ready to study, they will be able to work smarter and not harder.

Secret College Funding Formula

What is the secret college funding formula? Can you qualify to earn free college or get a full or partial scholarship?Secret College Funding Formula ~ Episode 88

What is the secret college funding formula? Can you qualify to earn free college or get a full or partial scholarship? Jean Burk shares great information about what colleges look for regarding need vs merit.

Visit College Prep Genius for more information for online classes, in-person boot camps, online boot camps, and upcoming membership classes (more information coming soon.)

[Disclaimer: Jean Burk is not a financial advisor or planner so contact your personal consultant for more details] However, this podcast will help you in becoming educated to seek additional help or information.

There is formula colleges use – COA-EFC = Need 

What do these acronyms stand for? COA is Cost of Attendance. EFC is for Estimated Family Contribution

The EFC is income-driven. There are ways to defer income if needed especially when applying for college.

The reality of paying for college is different for each person. The higher your income the higher your EFC is going to be. There are two types – the FSSTA -or the Institutional EFC where each college determines its own formula.

FAFSA: This must be filled out every year and October 1 is the deadline. They have a first come first serve basis on their pool of money. Even if you do not think you qualify, you should do it anyway. There are different types of aid you may be able to qualify for, and under 200,000 annual incomes still can qualify.

Test prep is important and higher SAT, ACT, and CLT scores will help your child in rankings and merit-based scholarships. You need a baseline score for this. You can go on your college board website or ACT tests and get a starting point and this is free online. Remember: every child can beat this test and that is where College Prep Genius can help!

What is your starting point? The EFC and once you find out what that point is and you have a place to start.

What do colleges consider?

  1. Parental income has to do with age as well as income. (Exceptions below).
  2. Parent assets – holding assets instead
  3. Student income / assets – assessed at a rate of 20 percent or 50 percent over 7,000.
  4. How many kids in college

Exceptions that don’t count in income are the retirement fund, equity in homes, etc. If your child has earned income or taxable wages it can be counted as a higher rate than the parent. Money that is saved they can use it up for a computer or car. The beginning of your student’s sophomore year of high school – or two years before going to college. There are things to do to spend your student assets or put it in a fund (college fund) that parents hold in their name.

The College Board website has an EFC calculator.

There are many ways to counter income (which a financial planner can help you with).

You want to have a high COA and a low EFC. There is the need-based aid and the merit-based aid. The need-based is on your income and your family’s ability to contribute. This comes from the government. Merit-based aid is only given from funding from the college regardless of your income level. Merit: SAT, ACT and CLT scores, sports, the arts, etc.

State colleges have a very small pool for merit-based scholarships. Private schools have more assets to contribute. The only private schools (Standford, Princeton, Harvard) that don’t need to use scholarships to recruit. They tend to be generous with need-based aid. If you can qualify to get into Harvard 100K-120K – it could be 12K to go to Harvard, if you can get in you may only need to pay a percentage.

Middle-income levels have the hardest time qualifying for need-based. Your student needs to be above the 75% percentile. There is a common data set you can search online for stats on schools that your student may qualify for.  [Much more on the podcast!]

The financial aid officer has databases of scholarships in house that may be available for more scholarships to apply for, while in school.

 

Myth No More SAT or ACT Tests

There is a myth of no more SAT and ACT tests. Is this true? Is it a reality? Listen to this podcast from an authority, Jean Burk.Myth No More SAT or ACT Tests ~ Episode 87

There is a myth of no more SAT and ACT tests. Is this true? Is it a reality? Listen to this podcast from the authority of all things college prep, and a reliable source, Jean Burk!

Visit Jean’s website at CollegePrepGenius.com There are many wonderful results of students who have taken the online eCourses, virtual boot camps, live classes, and in-person classes. In 2022 Jean has clocked in 17 years of success.

There is a rumor going around that the tests will be abolished especially in regard to no more SAT and ACT tests. At one point the tests were canceled due to the pandemic, however, the CLT was online and many students flocked to this testing option.

These tests are not going away, and here is why. Colleges need a fair way to compare all students. A 4.0 in one high school is not the same as another school. All schools calculate their schools differently. The only way a college can compare a student equally is with a standardized test like the SAT, ACT, or CLT. What is taught at one school is not taught at another.

The questions on these tests are logic tests and the tests are misleading on purpose. The tests are critical thinking skills because these tests are based on logic. Even very smart kids bomb the test. The test does not test what curriculum your student has taken it takes an objective question with one answer. Tests at school are about the subject you learned. But not the standardized test.

The questions used on the tests are drawn from all over the place and can not be crammed for, or studied for at the last minute.  Anyone can do well with practice. Some kids see patterns naturally and are good test-takers. Even if your child is not a good test taker, you can still train your brain to learn logically. SAT reveals that all kids are not the same.

This is not a fair test? No – it is an equal test that people can beat and study for, look for the patterns and figure out the way to do better. The test score can validate your transcript. Critical thinking is an example of college readiness.

No More SAT and ACT Tests?

How can this be true that there are no more SAT and ACT tests? Well, it is not and it is a total myth! If you see a college temporarily put off acceptance based on these tests, you will find there is another roadblock to admittance. (Listen to the podcast for details)

Some colleges in California (the UC – a small part of of the colleges – this currently encompasses 10 colleges). There are over 200 thousand each year that apply. These colleges decided to create their own entrance test. (Do the math – 200,000 x $60 (approx.) brings in a minimum 12 million dollars!

15% percent of schools that were “test-optional” still required an entrance test or a standardized test.

Tests must show a way that you are college-ready – and compare you to another applicant.

Colleges are based on the ranking based on test scores. Right now Princeton is number one, and Harvard is number two – these two schools sometimes trade on the first place. But you must have the highest scores to get into these schools. Rankings help colleges charge more money and take in applicants that will pay full amounts. This offsets other students (possibly sports scholarships) that have lower scores.

There has to be criteria for colleges in order to admit students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Test Prep Mistake 1 Test Books

Test Prep Mistakes 1 | Have your kids been told not to write in their SAT test books? Well, that is test prep mistake 1 test books and misinformation! | #podcast #homeschoolpodcast #homeschool #testprep #ACT #SAT #CollegePrepTest Prep Mistake 1 Test Books Episode 85

Have your kids been told not to write in their SAT test books? Well, that is test prep mistake 1 test books and misinformation! This is a series of mistakes parents and students believe and Jean shows you the facts and even where to find them on the college board website and how to nicely let your test proctor know, without being rude.

Did you know writing in your test book (which gets destroyed after the test and belongs to you anyway) is one of the best ways to raise your scores? In this episode, Jean shares insider information with you. Often mistakes are made and this podcast sets the record straight.

Free stuff from Jean!

Let me set the record straight: Not only are you allowed to write in your booklet, I encourage it and it’s not just me. The test-makers encourage it too. (links below)

Think with your pencil

Crystallize your thoughts on paper than solely working out problems in your head. Rather than sift through all the ideas that constantly come and go, you can clear your mind, clear the fog, gain some clarity, and simply write your ideas, or working, down. This strategy is also referred to as brain-dumping. 

Silly mistakes happen when your mind skips over something that could be instrumental in your understanding. In stressful exam conditions, you need to stack all the odds in your favor. Just note it down in your test booklet. 

There are several main learning systems and you will generally show a preference for one over the others: Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic, and Reading/Writing (which is a subset of Kinesthetic). The more systems you can engage in, the better the learning retention. In an exam situation, you can use this to your advantage by engaging Visual and Kinesthetic (and to a minor extent the Auditory system if you subvocalize when you read).

In all sections of your paper, use your pencil to markup, circle or underline the important parts in the question itself. Where you have multiple choice questions, cross out the wrong responses as you encounter them, to reduce your options. There is only ever one correct answer. If there are two that are very similar (or ostensibly the same answer where you cannot tell the difference), then that usually means they are likely both wrong.

When you read purposefully with your pencil at-the-ready, you will avoid the need for multiple re-readings of the same material.

The process of elimination is key

An incredibly useful strategy in every part of your test (except maybe for the essay) is to physically cross off those answers that are definitely wrong, first, and as you encounter them.  That’s a heck of a lot of potential clutter. Not only that, to have to read and reread wrong answers wastes precious time. If you ever go back to check answers and if wrong answers are marked, you can quickly revisit your process and not have to rework everything from the beginning. 

What this mark-up strategy is invaluable for is avoiding something called “decision fatigue”. Once an answer is excluded, it can be dumped—and out of your awareness—for good. Otherwise, your mind could be plagued by indecision and way too many options. “Resolve to resolve,” is what I like to say. Your mind will stay fresh, sharp, and alert.

Mark-up is helpful to locate the “low-hanging fruit”—or the easy marks, through a process of elimination. Give questions a ten-second once over. If you don’t know how to answer it quickly and correctly, mark it and move on. Come back to it later. If you have the opportunity to take a few passes through the test, you’ll continually knock off the easiest questions first.

A very important strategy is to have a specific way for you to denote the difficult questions, the ones you need to go back and review if you have time. Make it unique. Maybe an asterisk. What I like to do is to draw an open circle. When I go back for review and I am satisfied I have the answer—and so I know not to revisit that question yet again—I fill in the circle to make it solid.

Your annotation system means you can always be gainfully busy checking and improving your score.

Tips summarized:

  1. Identify the low-hanging fruit, the easy questions you can knock off.
  2. Use a process of elimination to identify fewer options as your final answer. Then work only on those.
  3. Mark those questions you cannot initially do quickly. Most people use an asterisk. I use an open circle that I fill in once I answer that question to my satisfaction.
  4. Go back and review questions unsure of or answered, until there is nothing more you can do, or you run out of time.
Reading

Seems crazy but don’t read the passages first. Read the questions. Underline the key words—especially comparative terms—in the questions before reading the passages. The questions will prime your brain to look for the right information on the first scan and detailed read of your passage. When answering your questions, you’ll be able to skip up to 75% of the passage. 

Math

Math problems and pencils seem destined for each other. Remember however, that many of the questions don’t need full working out to find the right answers. Sometimes it will be as simple as eliminating the obviously wrong choices.

  • There will be times when you are not allowed to use your calculator and use of mental arithmetic is your only option. Don’t work out answers on a calculator if you don’t need to. 
  • You may be given ‘scratch paper’ but the booklet can always act as one.
  • Note down formulas and acronyms at the top of your paper.
  • Keep focus and avoid mistakes by writing down even the simplest of things. Just as with the Reading section, if you have to go back to review a difficult question, you’ll be able to pick up where you left off. If you encounter a difficult problem, then some amount of work will help you review it later.
  • When you’re given a diagram, mark it up with all the data that you’re given within the question. Many drawings are often not to scale so proportions derived by your intuition won’t necessarily be correct. If a drawing is not scaled correctly, redraw it.
  •  

There are a limited number of question-types you can and will be asked. At College Prep Genius you will learn how to approach each and every one of these. There are specific strategies that will see you power through by being quickly able to identify the type. Use your pencil to note what strategy you need to solve it. 

Writing

In this section, you also have very limited time per question. Without factoring in reading time, you have 36 seconds on the ACT and 47 seconds on the SAT. There simply is no way to finish on time. You need a system.

Here’s another hint: By marking one of the 13 recurring grammar problems, it is easier and quicker to find the correct answer. For example, if the underlined part of the passage contains the words, “not only” then circle it and find the answer choice that contains, “but also”. As you can see, there are rules you can learn to set you right.

Essay

You will handwrite your essay using the provided four-lined, blank pages. Print your work or use cursive, but either way, just make it legible. 

It’s worth remembering that the SAT essay is optional, but you will learn a reliable essay template at College Prep Genius to make it a shoe-in. You should always write the optional essay for many reasons (which is not the subject of this article).

What if someone at the test says you can’t mark your test booklet?

If you are in any doubt as to the permitted use of the test booklet, or you think others (such as the proctor) at the exam might be unsure, then be prepared. Download and print the official information found in the College Board tweet, and have it ready to present. The official College Board Student Guide notates several times: “Use the test booklet for scratch work.” You will also find information that states, “you will not receive credit for anything that you write in your test book.” 

Remember, mark-up your paper, cross out what you deem to be the wrong answers, and transfer your chosen answers to the answer sheet.

Something is awry if you’ve been asked to write your name on the cover of your booklet but told not to write inside. If for some reason, you are told not to or were prevented from writing in your booklet and it affected your score, then call SAT or ACT immediately. At the very least, you could be offered a refund or a future free test. You can also contact fairtest.org.

International testing

If you happen to be taking the test in an international center, then know there may be an exception to the booklet writing rule. This is quite normal and has more to do with booklet availability. You can request to write in the booklet if you do so before you sit the test. Make sure you do. Not being able to write in the booklet puts you at a great disadvantage.

Additional Podcasts on Financial Information for Colleges here.

OFFICE CONTACT INFO
SALES:  817.282.7737 ext. 2.
LIVE VIRTUAL BOOT CAMPS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or collegeprepgenius.com/LiveVirtual
HOSTING OUR AWARD-WINNING CLASS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or go to collegeprepgenius.com/host.
GENERAL QUESTIONS: 817.282.7737 ext. 4

Additional Podcasts:

Testing in the time of COVID

Checklist 11-12th Grade

College Checklist 9th – 10th Grade

College Checklist 9th-10th grade | When you navigate college do you have a college checklist 9th - 10th grade need? How can your student be well rounded? GREAT applicants are the key and listen in as Jean breaks this down for you. Be prepared with this college checklist that is grade-specific. | #podcast #collegeprep #collegeprepgenius #ultimatecollegelist #ultimatehomeschoollist-9-10College Checklist for 9th – 10th Grades ~ Episode 83 with Jean Burk

When you navigate college do you have a college checklist 9th – 10th grade need? How can your student be well rounded? GREAT applicants are the key and listen in as Jean breaks this down for you. Be prepared with this college checklist that is grade-specific.

First, start your checklist here with Jean Burks Road Map to College you can download it from Jean’s website CollegePrepGenius.com/roadmap

Free Homeschool Help! 

Additional Podcasts on Financial Information for Colleges here.

OFFICE CONTACT INFO
SALES:  817.282.7737 ext. 2.
LIVE VIRTUAL BOOT CAMPS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or collegeprepgenius.com/LiveVirtual
HOSTING OUR AWARD-WINNING CLASS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or go to collegeprepgenius.com/host.
GENERAL QUESTIONS: 817.282.7737 ext. 4

Additional Podcasts:

Testing in the time of COVID

College Checklist 11-12th Grade

College Checklist 9th-10th Grade:

Do you need a checklist to get you started with all those difficult decisions? Here is some of what is covered.

  1. What colleges to apply for
  2. College prep planning
  3. Curriculum
  4. Classes to take
  5. Being prepared for 9th – 10th grades

 

 

Checklist For College 11-12

Checklist For College 11-12 | Help to chart your course, a checklist for college 11-12 grades! Not everyone goes to college but if you are planning to go this podcast is for you. This is for grades 11 and 12, so juniors and seniors, this is the podcast for you. It is crunch time for the twelfth grade, and last year of prep for the juniors. You will love this great information! | #podcast #homeschoolpodcast #collegeprep #collegeprepgenius #collegeprep11thgrade #collegeprep12thgradeChecklist for College 11-12 Grades ~ Episode 82 with Jean Burk

Help to chart your course, a checklist for college 11-12 grades! Not everyone goes to college but if you are planning to go this podcast is for you. This is for grades 11 and 12, so juniors and seniors, this is the podcast for you. It is crunch time for the twelfth grade, and the last year of prep for the juniors. You will love this great information!

You are going to be blown away by this information! You would have to pay thousands to get this information with a personal coach. Jean Burk’s an amazing author and teacher of getting free college at College Prep Genius has boot camp and classes to help you! There is 24 Billion dollars of worth of college money out there, why can’t you get some of this? Listen to find out how.

First, start your checklist here with Jean Burks Road Map to College you can download it from Jean’s website CollegePrepGenius.com/roadmap

Additional Podcasts on Financial Information for Colleges here.

OFFICE CONTACT INFO
SALES:  817.282.7737 ext. 2.
LIVE VIRTUAL BOOT CAMPS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or collegeprepgenius.com/LiveVirtual
HOSTING OUR AWARD-WINNING CLASS: 817.282.7737 ext. 3 or go to collegeprepgenius.com/host.
GENERAL QUESTIONS: 817.282.7737 ext. 4

 

Additional Podcasts:

Testing in the time of COVID

*****

Why go to College?

  1. Why go? College child the ability to get jobs that require a college degree.
  2. Teach children to interact with  and
  3. Freedom, responsibility, learn to deal with a schedule, learn good work ethics ready for a job.

Excuses For Not Attending College:

  1. Too expensive
  2. Too hard
  3. Low GPA

Additional Test Prep Tests is the CLT which will allow you to stand out from the other standardized tests. Reach out to the CLT for more information.

Jean can help you with these issues by using a well thought out plan. Once you remove the excuses and the financial burden what else will you do the next four years that this as productive? If you need a plan here it is!

Juniors and Seniors here are the various areas you need to work on:

Seniors – taking AP courses to get college credits and shows mastery

Low GPA? Alternative transcript – dual enrollment at a college.

What if you do not know what you want to do, or what you are good at? Jean recommends:

Juniors: This is your “to-die” year. This is the year for many tests.

Don’t be too aggressive. but stay strong in your course load/ AP classes and will help your GPA

To-Do List Checklist for College 11-12 Grades:

  1. Separate email just for college correspondence
  2. Think about the types of colleges you want to attend
  3. What do you want to major in? Personality and aptitude tests can help. *Jean names a few on air.
  4. Look at college websites. (US Dept. of Education has a link to colleges based on degree.)
  5. Make up a list of the safe, reach, and dream colleges. At least 10 of the colleges you want to attend.
  6. Contact colleges for more information (to the new email)
  7. Reach out to the admission counselors in the colleges.
  8. Check the Tuition Tracker.

Checklist for College 11-12

Great information you need to know. Be sure to use black ink if you are using something filled out. Never leave a blank space, put in N/A if it does not apply to you. Use registered mail when you send something in the mail. Be sure to write a stand-out essay. (Information on air about the details of this.) Use ZeeMee – a very cool app to add additional information to make you stand out. You can upload photos and videos to this app.

Must-Know Information:

  1. Transcripts up to the 1st-semester senior year
  2. Test scores
  3. Letter of recommendation

 

Testing Secrets During COVID

Testing Secrets During COVID | With so much misinformation out there about college testing here are the testing secrets during COVID, Jean Burk with College Prep Genuis is here to set the record straight. | #podcast #testingpodcast #homeschoolpodcast #testingsecrets #SAT #ACT #CLT #testingsecretsCollege Testing Secrets In The Time Of COVID ~ Episodes 80

With so much misinformation out there about college testing here are the testing secrets during COVID, Jean Burk with College Prep Genuis is here to set the record straight. Tests are constantly being canceled, and it is such a confusing time. With so much frustration among students and families, here is a simple guide of 5 top tips to help you navigate the uncertainty.

If you are the parent of a college to be a student it has been a very confusing time. People are worried, and confused about what to do – is there liability if someone gets sick? Parents are angry with the SAT college boards and ACT college boards. But Jean explains test makers do have a link with updates with cancellations and extended testing time and additional test times. She suggests you pay more attention to the college board websites rather than a friend that has misinformation.

Tests may be canceled but not necessarily in your area. The wrong information is being shared and that is the issue. First, one claim is that the SAT and ACT tests are going away. They are not going away. There are some schools that are temporarily suspending the testing for right now.

ARTICLE – California school system the USC which has 10 schools out of nearly 5000, and they are coming up with their own test which is similar to the ACT and SAT – Keep in mind there is misinformation out there.  80% of colleges give scholarship money just based on a test score.  The reason colleges can not just use transcripts is that different high schools have different levels of difficulty. For example, if a student has a 4.0 or 4.5 transcript in high school in one school, and they are not the same value as a student in another school. On paper, they look the same but the school load or class load can be very different.

College Testing: SAT, ACT & CLT:

The one numerical component that is fair to all kids is a fair system known as standardized testing. There have been cries that it is biased, but actually, it is not. It is based on logic, reasoning skills, and the ability to answer questions under a time constraint and pressure. It crosses the socioeconomic group as well. Colleges achieve their national ranking based on test scores. Colleges get more money based on ranking. SO, these are extremely important for the college.

Five Tips to Taking Test During Difficult Times:

  1. Find a location that is having the test. School search button – zip code, schools in your area. It gives you a place to start. If you are not finding a location, your support group your co-op you can become your own test facility. Link collegeprepgenius.com/testingsites — directly to the information you need to figure this out. ACT as well. If the facilities are canceled – you can reschedule or get a refund. To transfer you have to complete the form on the website. Be sure you have the right, email to the account. [Cancelling happens – you can get it canceled by online form or call the phone number. It takes a while to get your refund, so keep that in mind.
  2. Alternative tests – if your ACT is canceled see if the SAT is canceled – they are about 99% the same test … still doing well if you know how to logically answer the question and beat the test. The new PSAT date – offering a Jan. 26th If you have a junior right now, don’t take the Oct. test. Wait for the Jan. test you have several more months to promise. National Merit Scholarship is based on the PSAT test only in the Jr. year. One student went up 590 points in your SAT in 5 months! You can get a full ride to just about every school. Full ride, full tuition, dorms, money in cash, the perks and benefits are unbelievable.

Oct. CLT – All of a sudden (Classical learning Test – PODCAST) proctored remotely and schools began accepting the CLT that never accepted it before. All schools were accepting the CLT now since the pandemic. Read more about how to beat the CLT – tips CollegePrepGenius.com/clt – information about it.

Could apply to a test-optional school without a SAT and ACT not required but to get scholarship money you need a SAT and ACT 0 80-90 percent of students will still submit a score. It will set you apart in a negative way, even though they are not required, it is important to the school. Submit other tests instead of the AP or IB tests, school-administered placement test. Catch: Vary between universities. AP will work in one school and not another. Require means a minimum.

  1. Deferred Exam score submission. Allow new students to enroll that they will submit score later when they can –bought yourself some time to study for it. At this point, it is not clear if you don’t make a high enough score, so it is a gray area. It gives you a grace period. But, no scholarship.
  2. Special accommodation for high school students – if you are a senior right now, and not taken the test –early registration access to the test. Who has not taken it you will get priority. If you have taken the test it does not apply, but If you have never taken the test it applies.
  3. Don’t stop test prep. Use this as a grace period. It is a time to study they are beatable test; it is a different skill test. It is knowing how to take the test. Learning the logic makes the test beatable; the questions are purposely misleading. It is a skill because the colleges are testing your ability to answer questions under pressure in a short amount of time.

Your decision should be the institution and not the money on how to pay it. Do not worry about content, learn the recurring patterns, standardized questions, and standardized answers. Success can be yours! 3-Day and 8-week Boot Camp online. Online eCourse at no cost. Proven program with lots of awards.

Special Replay: Beat Standardized Test Scores The Right Way

Beat Standardized Test Scores | We've all heard the news accounts of the illegal ways that rich parents try to beat the standardized test scores with high payouts and behind the scenes workarounds. | #testscandal #varsityblues #podcast #homeschoolpodcast #testingBeat Standardized Test Scores The Right Way Episode 78

We’ve all heard the news accounts of the illegal ways that rich parents try to beat the standardized test scores with high payouts and behind the scenes workarounds. This has caused a backlash and if you have listened to these podcasts throughout the years you realize that Jean Burk has the answers without cheating!

Thanks to our sponsor, College Prep Genius, learn more here.

Varsity Blues! These people beat the standardized test scores illegally! 

  • A CEO paid 75k to have his child’s SAT scores changed.
  • SAT scores were corrected
  • Proctors are flown in to oversee tests
  • 250,000 was paid to say their child had a disability to get extra time on the test.
  • Another family paid to have a child placed on a water polo team that never played the sport.

Now there has been a huge backlash and many colleges are reevaluating the entry of students caught up in this scandal. With 85% of colleges relying on test scores alone, input from coaches and proctors now colleges like Yale, Standford and Georgetown are considering expelling or denying some of the applications who had a remote connection to Mr. Singer who owned the company that the wealthy hired,

No cheating or wealth needed to beat the standardized scores.

Tips For Test Taking to Beat Standardized Test Scores:

  • SAT means logic skills – critical thinking
  • It is the only fair way to level the playing field among students (otherwise GPA would be based only on your high school experience – this varies greatly.)
  • Programs free (Kahn Academy) or 25K – scores only raised approx. 250 points. College Prep Genius has had increased scores up to 600 points! Very inexpensive. 
  • No age limits on the test – students can begin early. You can’t start too early! Middle school is a perfect time.
  • Accuracy before speed is important
  • SAT and ACT are all about patterns and rules
  • You can learn how to answer the questions quickly with practice-must answer the questions in 30 to 60 seconds or less

Some classes are as high as 25K for SAT and ACT prep – these are only affordable for the rich, however, this is not the norm and you can do so much better with good programs for a fraction of the cost. Check out College Prep here.

There are two types of students. The logic minded – sees patterns naturally and the smart student – the rule follower that wants to take the time and really look over every question. You only have about one minute per question and you can’t be a perfectionist and take this test quickly without some practice.

Beat Standardized Test Scores – More Tips

  • Test taking is a skill
  • Most standardized tests are written in a similar way
  • One correct answer and all the other answers are distractions
  • No instant success
  • Kids have to practice – daily is best
  • Use testing prep as part of your homeschool class
  • Free college is out there with high enough test scores
  • Go to the SAT or ACT official websites for free question of the day
  • Print out the questions and practice doing things with paper and pencil
  • Don’t only use the computer to practice since the tests are given in a written format
  • Test prep even works for Postgrad tests and Military tests.

Special Replay: ABC’s Of Early College

abc's of early collegeSpecial Replay: The ABCs of Early College

 Podcast #64

Do you know the ABC’s of Early College Admission? Whether you are getting college credits or an AA degree, you may be considered a transfer student, and you may miss out on scholarships – low-cost college and credits. If you’ve ever considered this option, listen to this podcast for great information from Jean Burk.

Visit our sponsor – College Prep Genius

Show Notes: ABC’s of Early College

  1. What are some college trends?
    1. 66% of college graduates are ending up with 100K of debt. The unemployment rate is 9% — nearly 38% work in positions that don’t require any college at all.
    2. Low-cost college and credits
    3. Bachelor’s degree can make 182% more per week
    4. College tuition increased by 600%
  2. 12 Early college benefits?
    1. For homeschoolers broadens their course offerings
    2. Enhances academic rigor
    3. Avoids duplication of course work
    4. Increases their schedule flexibility – earn extra minors or majors
    5. Tend to finish college as a whole
    6. Earning a technical degree or certificate while in high school
    7. Shortens your time to earn a degree
    8. Reduce college costs
    9. Transferable college credits – basic or core credits
    10. Earning high school and science simultaneously
    11. Building your student’s confidence
    12. Still, home so you can guide and coach them
  3. Name the 3 main types of early college?
    1. Build an amazing transcript – Podcast 1 -https://ultimateradioshow.com/transcripts-your-key-to-free-college/

Podcast 2 – https://ultimateradioshow.com/transcripts-your-key-to-free-college-2/

  1. AP – advanced placement credits
    1. By college board – same people who make the SAT
    2. Challenging and show mastery
  • Approved by the college board
  1. Online, or buying the books and study on your own, take courses by AP teacher who was authorized by the college board
  2. Listen to the audio for recommendations for official AP courses online
  3. 38 courses your students can take
  1. CLEP—College level placement
    1. Be prepared to be sure it all transfers to the college you want to attend.
    2. Made by the college board, 2900 colleges and universities accept them, there is a cost for test and test center.
  • No age limits or restrictions
  1. Tests are 90 minutes long
  2. Testing centers listed on College board website.
  3. Official study guides by the college board
  1. Dual Enrollment – early enrollment
    1. Sometimes credits don’t transfer
    2. High school and college at the same time
  • The transition from high school to college easier
  1. Core classes out of the way
  1. What test scores are required?
    1. The entrance exam is still needed for college even junior or state college
    2. Scores need to be high enough on SAT and ACT for admission, check the college of choice