Handwriting Basics

Handwriting Basics | Handwriting basics begin with exercises to strengthen the child's hands. In this episode, Felice Gerwitz interviews Jodie Oare who is an early childhood instructor, who has spent over twenty years working with preschoolers. | #podcast #homeschoolpodcastHandwriting Basics – Episode 338

Handwriting basics begin with exercises to strengthen the child’s hands. In this episode, Felice Gerwitz interviews Jodie Oare who is an early childhood instructor, (and her sister-in-law) who has spent over twenty years working with preschoolers. Jodie has put together

Share this show with a friend.

Our sponsors make these broadcasts free! Visit our sponsor Time 4 Learning

Handwriting involves many components

  1. Visual Motor Skills: using eyes and hands in coordination; ability to copy, draw, write what the eyes see
  2. Fine Motor Skills: using small movements involving wrist, hand, and fingers
  3. Bilateral skills: ability to use both sides of body; one side to stabilize paper/material while the other side to manipulate an implement
  4. Hand strength and endurance: promoting muscle strength of hand and fingers; includes grip, pinch and squeeze motions
  5. Executive Functioning: thoughtful planning, organizing and preparing to execute the activity

 

 

Activities that involve the hand, fingers, wrist, and arm also engage the entire upper body, torso, hips, legs, feet, and toes. A strong body will help as the child begins and continues to acquire fine motor skills used with general life activities as well as academic/school activities.

Fine Motor Skills: skills that require small movements involving wrist, hand, and fingers that produce outcomes requiring coordination, strength, dexterity, and planning. Examples of these skills are buttoning, zipping, cutting, writing, coloring, turning pages, key boarding, building Legos, and using utensils.

Handwriting does not begin with a pencil and paper.

It begins with activities that strengthen hands and fingers.

  1. Playdoh
  2. Swinging
  3. Lacing
  4. Gripping (bike handlebars, utensils, tools, sports equipment)
  5. Squeezing
  6. Climbing
  7. Picking up, playing with toys
  8. Dressing
  9. Stacking and building
  10. Coloring

Variables such as length of time and the degree of difficulty increase hand strength and endurance for life skills and future endeavors with school activities.

Playdoh is a good introductory/warm-up activity that encourages hand/finger muscle development, that children usually enjoy, and does not require skill.

Lacing activities can also be an introductory/warm-up activity however lacing does require some skill, coordination, and overall body strength which can be frustrating in the beginning.

Introducing paper, crayons, markers, and pencils can be done mindfully, in a way that encourages positive habits and a life long love of writing. (Podcast # 339 Discusses introducing crayons).

Discuss activities and describe from top to bottom. Encourage activities to be done in a thoughtful way, discussing strategy, shapes, detail and the big picture.

 


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -TimeforLearning.com


Speak Your Mind

*

Get your FREE Spring Activities Guide for Kids!