Help with Seasonal Allergies

Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.Join Julie Polanco on this episode of Crunchy Christian Podcast as she discusses help with seasonal allergies using non-medicinal methods.

Help with Seasonal Allergies

Last week, Julie discussed the importance of addressing food allergies to recover from seasonal allergies. In addition to dietary changes, you can reduce seasonal allergy symptoms with some other simple strategies.

Home environment

Air filters

The first thing that Julie mentions is the positive effect that using room air filters can have. Also, keeping the windows closed or at most, cracked, also goes a long way toward reducing exposure. That’s the key. Reduce exposure to pollen, mold, and other allergens. In addition to room air filters, using a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter is a must.

Furniture and cleaners

Furniture with lots of cushions (such as couches) and rooms with wall-to-wall carpeting harbor more allergens. Stuffed animals also contribute. They are harder to clean thoroughly and it’s easy for allergens to get trapped. If you have many of these in your home, you will need to vacuum very thoroughly more often. You may also need to consider deep cleaning with a shampoo carpet cleaner (these can be used on couches) more often, too.

Be careful with the cleaners you choose so they are sanitizing, but non-irritating and safe for children and pets.

Steam inhalation

Neti pot

This was Julie’s best friend for a while! If you are not familiar with the neti pot, it looks like a small genie lamp. You fill it with a warm saltwater solution, tip your head, and slowly pour the solution into one nostril. The solution should come running out the other nostril. If not, you need to adjust the tilt of your head. You don’t want it running down your throat. The neti pot helps wash away inhaled allergens. It tends to be very calming and soothing to the nose and sinuses. This can be safely used when you have a cold, too.

Salt inhaler

For children, it’s hard to use a neti pot. Many adults also have a hard time using it. It can be uncomfortable. A salt inhaler is much easier to use, but each person needs to have their own. The idea is to breathe in the salt air through your mouth. Then, breathe out through your nose. After doing this for about ten to fifteen minutes, it clears the nasal passages and the lungs. It, too, can be helpful during times of illness and is safe for children.

Other Help with Seasonal Allergies

Honey and bee pollen

Eating locally grown honey or bee pollen before the allergy season starts can be helpful in teaching the body not to react to the local allergens. Some people swear by honey, but Julie has not found it to be effective on it’s own.

Quercitin

Another help with seasonal allergies is quercitin. Quercitin is a natural supplement that acts as an anti-histamine in the body. It is usually included in herbal remedies and is quite effective when coupled with one or more of the above helps. Julie used this in conjunction with other natural remedies that she will discuss next week!

Probiotics

Many people with seasonal allergies also have candida and gut issues. These gut issues are often caused by diet, as discussed in the last episode. They also stem from candida overgrowth and bacterial imbalances in the gut flora. Probiotics can be helpful in restoring the correct balance of good bacteria in the gut. I t can also keep candida (which is a fungus, just like mold is a fungus) in check. Again, it is best used as part of a complete program, not alone.

Julie will discuss using herbs and essential oils for seasonal allergies next week. So, don’t forget to subscribe! And, don’t forget to hop on over to Julie Naturally and get your Healthy Habits Tracker!

Additional Resources

Julie has several blog posts about this. Check these out:

How to Treat Children’s Allergies Naturally

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