How to Help Teens Explore Interests, Interview with Samantha Shank

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: How to Help Teens Explore Interests.

How to Help Teens Explore Interests. Samantha Shank of LearnInColor.com shares her story of developing her interests and goals in homeschool high school. #HomeschoolHighSchool #CareerExploration #SamanthaShank #LearnInColor #ExploringInterestsForTeens

How to Help Teens Explore Interests

One of the most important tasks for homeschool high schoolers is learning about themselves so that they can fulfill who God created them to be. Vicki is joined by our friend, Samantha Shank of Learn in Color and the Learn in Color Podcast  for a lively discussion about the ways she explored her interests and learned to be an entrepreneur while homeschooling. You don’t want to miss this episode!

Samantha is the oldest of her six siblings, all homeschooled for at least part of their educations. Her parents were working parents who allowed and encouraged Samantha to explore interests. One of her earliest interests was history. As early as fourth grade, Samantha was impacted by the tragedies of the Holocaust. The more she learned about it, the more she wanted to share with others.

She started blogging when she was 14 years old and developed an audience among homeschooling families. She began sharing resources and ideas for teaching World War II, the Holocaust and other history topics.

While still in high school, Samantha started exploring the ideas of entrepreneurship. During her mornings, she would attend community networking meetings and learned about business from business people.

Today, Samantha is a college graduate who is a full-time entrepreneur. She creates curriculum supplements at LearnInColor.com such as:

Make time for teens to explore interests and ideas. It's good education. #HomeschoolHighSchool #CareerExploration #InterestDevelopmentForTeens #HealthyAdolescence

During her homeschool high years, Samantha learned how to explore interests by:

Exploring rabbit trails

When Samantha had a random thought or was curious about something that was inspired by what was learning, her parents encouraged her to stop and explore that idea. This required the courage to set aside curriculum for a while and allow her to research these interests.

*Advice for Homeschool Moms: Try not to be overly bound to the curriculum and syllabus. We all know our homeschool high schoolers must complete their credits for graduation, but we also want to them discover who God made them to be. That often comes in the off-curriculum explorations in life.

Asking questions

Do not be afraid of questions. Take time to research the questions, explore options and idea. This takes time, but finding some answers gave Samantha the ability to take next steps as she explored her interests.

This might take the form of doing interviews. Samantha frequently met with business owners and interviewed them for their entrepreneurial stories.

Sharing what she learned

Samantha shared on her blog. Homeschool high schoolers can share what they learn as they explore their interests on their own blogs or with co-op, family and friends.

*Advice: Trust your trustworthy teens. Samantha’s parents were trusting of Samantha to get her work done.

*Advice: Prepare to be busy. Samantha’s parents were willing to drive Samantha to interviews and experiences. They believed in her and God’s plans for her.

*Advice: Avoided helicopter parenting. Don’t run the show for your homeschool high schoolers. Let them do the exploring. (Check out this HSHSP episode on Heavy Equipment Mothering.)

Finding networks

Samantha found KidBlogger network which also helped her grow her blogging skills and influence.

Learning to set goals

Samantha developed the goal to graduate from college debt free. She realized her blogging business could help with that but that she should diversify her income streams. She looked into college scholarships for her academics (she had good SAT scores) and also found beauty pageants (we’ll talk about that on another podcast interview later).

Showing interests on the transcript

Her advice: Take college choice seriously. Look into college search and majors and spend some time on it. (Download this freebie from Vicki’s Coaching website about choosing college majors and check out our blogpost on starting college search.)

Working hard

Samantha graduated college in two and a half years. She pushed because she wanted to stay debt-free taking 17-24 credits at a time, with some of those online at another college. She kept her goals in mind and worked hard.

In her homeschooling high school years, Samantha also worked hard doing several things:

  • Managed Pinterest accounts for bloggers (Samantha began doing this at 15 years old)
  • Create content for other bloggers (Samantha designed products and wrote for other bloggers from high school and through college)
  • Kept up her blogging and networking

Building relationships

Samantha chose well for her goals with her small college. She was able to communicate with her professors and had good mentoring relationships with them. She was open about her goals and work schedule. Often, they could work with her to help her achieve her goals.

Join Vicki and Samantha Shank for a fun episode on helping teens explore their interests.

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How to Help Teens Explore Interests

How to Create Honors Credits on Homeschool Transcript

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: How to Create Honors Credits on Homeschool Transcript.

How to Create Honors Credits on Homeschool Transcript

Vicki shares how to create a powerful transcript by building Honors credits. She explains the method called “leveling up” that her family and the homeschool umbrella school that all the 7Sisters’ homeschoolers have graduated from. Check out this Homeschool Highschool Podcast episode that explains the concept of “Levels”.

If you have homeschool high schoolers who are headed for college, it is likely they will need to show rigor on the homeschool transcript. How do you handle creating courses with rigor and showing them on the transcript?

Well, it’s complicated! There are not any unified how-to’s. Our advice is:

  • Choose your method
  • Keep it consistent through all core courses (core courses are Language Arts, Maths, Sciences, Social Studies and World Languages)
  • Make sure you create a legend or key on transcript that explains a little about how the level of rigor was achieved
  • Be sure to record along with the title of the course, the level of rigor that your homeschool high schoolers achieved

This is how we do it. First decide on the level for each course:

Level 1: Remedial Level

  • This is not college level. It is for student who are severely behind or have learning disabilities.

Level 2: Average High School Level

  • These are courses with textbooks that have easier reading levels and shorter lessons. Some examples would include: Westfield Studios 101, Pacemaker series.
  • If your homeschool high schoolers complete a Level 2 course it will not prevent them from getting into college.
  • However, the colleges that accept Level 2 courses will most likely be community colleges or some private colleges.
  • Make sure that the Level 2 courses are not in the courses that will become your teens’ college majors.
  • Very few courses should be Level 2 for college-bound teens.

Level 3: College Preparatory Level

  • Most available textbooks are Level 3. Some examples of Level 3 publishers are,Apologia, BJU Press and Abeka.

Level 4: Advanced Level

  • This level is more powerful than college prep.
  • Leveling up the Level 3 to Level 4 in our homeschool umbrella school requires completing a Level 3 course plus one half of another Level 3 course of that same topic.
  • This will earn 1 credit of that course at Level 4.
  • It is an attractive credit to many colleges.

Level 5: Honors Level

  • An Honors level homeschool high school course is similar in rigor to an AP course. However, the title “AP” can only be used by courses specifically approved by  the College Board. They own that designation.
  • Honors level courses are highly rigorous; they require a lot of work. This is worth it for teens who are applying to competitive private or state colleges.
  • Concentrate on Honors level for courses in the general area of your homeschool high schoolers’ future major or interest area.
  • Some competitive colleges want to see ALL core courses at Honors level. Check with colleges of interest for their requirements.

Create a college-attractive transcript by building Honors-level credits. Develop powerful credits by adding extra rigor for Honors courses.

How do you develop Honors credit?

It is hard work. A teen working on a Level 5 Honors credit will be doing about double the Level 3 College Prep.

7Sisters textbooks and Literature Study Guides include instructions (with Literature Study Guides the instructions vary by age and grade). Listen to this HSHSP episode for tips on using the levels feature of 7Sisters curriculum.

Start with:

Textbook average or college prep.

Then add:

  • Add 16 extra real book in interest areas/subject area
  • For example, if Biology will be your teen’s major: choose books exploring an interest such as birds, including:
    Books on Famous Ornithologists, Bird behaviors
  • Write summary of each book

The textbook plus 16 books and summaries become ONE Honors credit.

Another way to earn an Honors credit could be adding a Carnegie credit.

For more information on Carnegie credits check out this post.

Start with:

Textbook average or college prep.

Then add:

  • Logged extra Carnegie Unit of credit (varies by state 120-180 hours of instruction). Make sure you document these hours.
  • Create the Carnegie credit by:
    • Developing an interest through field trips, writing research papers (keys with Language Arts), projects, related volunteer work, related apprenticeships
    • For instance, if your teen’s interest is Psychology, volunteer at rescue mission to see what other people’s lives are like
  • Make these hours useful to your teen.
  • Keep really good logs. Suggestion: have teens log hours themselves. This develops independent learners (or panicked learners if they put logging off too long.)

The textbook plus Carnegie credit becomes ONE Honors credit.

Or try a combination

  • College textbook plus 8 books and half-credit logged hours.

Remember, homeschool high schoolers are doing double credits BUT on transcript they only receive 1 credit. College admissions officers LOVE these Honors credits.

Search Honors credit at 7Sisters for more ideas.

 

When teens develop interest they feel engaged and proud of themselves. It gives them a nice expertise in an area and creates a powerful transcript. When the Honors credit is in an area of their choice, they can use this expertise in a college admissions interview.

How to Create Honors Credits on Homeschool Transcript

HSHSP Ep 189: The Importance of Homeschool Community, Interview with Ann Karako

This week on HSHSP Ep 189: The Importance of Homeschool Community, Interview with Ann Karako.

HSHSP Ep 189: The Importance of Homeschool Community, Ann Karako. Popular homeschool guide, Ann, shares about community for moms homeschooling high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolCommunity #CommunityForHomeschoolMoms #AnnKarako #HowToHomeschoolHighSchool

 

This week on HSHSP Ep 189: The Importance of Homeschool Community, Interview with Ann Karako

Vicki is excited this week to be joined by an old digital friend, Ann Karako. Many homeschoolers are familiar with Ann. She is the popular homeschool blogger at Annie and Everything and many of us homeschooling high school parents are involved in her HUGE Facebook community: It’s Not That Hard to Homeschool High School!

Ann and her husband have five kids, who have homeschooled all the way from pre-kindergarten. She dropped her fourth homeschool graduate off for freshman semester at college this September, so she just has one more high schooler to go!

They started homeschooling their kids in the beginning because of the inspiration of their kids’ babysitters who were homeschoolers. These teens were such great role models for their kids that they wanted to give their children a similar formative experience. Homeschoolers are the best advertisement for homeschooling!

Now entering their 21st year of homeschooling, Ann is grateful for each year!

Ann has also spent her homeschool years investing in the homeschool community. Community formation is Ann’s calling. Ann found that when she started homeschooling the middle school years, her homeschool support system was thinning because many parents were intimidated by the thought of homeschooling the higher grades. By high school, Ann had only a couple of homeschooling high school family/friends.

Ann Karako

Photo used with permission

Ann knew that the high school years are marvelous for homeschooling, but they could also be challenging with paperwork, credits and hormones to deal with. She knows we need the homeschool mom support more than ever.

Vicki and Ann both found that homeschooling in community helped so much in:

  • Swapping out subjects with other moms (like giving dissections for Biology to moms who do not mind doing them, or writing to moms who love writing)
  • Getting advice and support

As she was facing those homeschooling high school years, she woke up one morning and decided to find a digital community for herself. Thus, she started It’s Not That Hard to Homeschool High School. There are tens of thousands of moms in the group who ask questions and share advice on:

  • Curriculum choices
  • Logging credits
  • Transcript development
  • General encouragement

Ann does not put us with “YOU SHOULD’s”. She does not allow that in her facebook group because she knows there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school. (Have you ever heard that from the 7Sisters, too?) She encourages everyone to give advice without “shoulds”. This attitude keeps the conversation leaning into mentoring, encouragement and support for moms who are homeschooling high school (and available 24/7).

Vicki tells Ann about the Homeschool Highschool Podcast interview with Misty Bailey, who shared about how to not be afraid to homeschool high school. Misty told Vicki that her main inspiration for homeschooling her teens was Ann Karako.

Ann’s influence was available because she is determined to invest in other homeschooling families. As Ann learned about things that worked in homeschooling her high schoolers, she shared what she learned in her popular website, Annie and Everything. Ann tells the story of doing her high school research (which included researching the public school requirements and feeling intimidated and irritated. Her husband reminded her that they are homeschoolers so they don’t HAVE to do high school like the public schools. Ann has been determined to share this: do what is right for your teens).

Ann reminds us the only thing you absolutely must do is follow your state homeschool law!

Homeschool moms need hugs, too. Check out encouragement and verbal hugs at Annie and Everything, and the Homeschool Highschool Podcast.

Find information and community for homeschool moms with Ann Karako at:

HUGS for homeschooling high school. Help Understanding Grace Strength. This is Ann’s online paid membership community ($10/month). It is for Christian homeschooling moms of teens. She will discussing Christian parenting, homeschooling and curriculum in a safe setting where moms do not need to calm down their *Jesus talk*. There  daily discussions and monthly themes and live get togethers. Ann is spending daily live-time there now.

Ann also has two books about homeschooling high school:

Also don’t forget to check out 7Sisters Authoritative Guide series (lots of how-to, in-depth informational posts)

Join Vicki and Ann for this encouraging discussion on homeschooling community for homeschool moms.


Thank you to our Sponsor -The Star Movie

 

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HSHSP Ep 189: The Importance of Homeschool Community, Ann Karako

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

This week on HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans.

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans. Make homeschool high school fun and effective with experiential learning. Don't take school so seriously! Have fun! #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HandsOnLearning #ExperientialLearning #HomeschoolHighSchool #SusanEvans

 

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

Do your homeschool high schoolers have days that they HATE their studies? Teens get bored with nothing but textbooks! Join Vicki and our friend, Susan Evans, who reminds us that teens don’t outgrow the need for experiential learning! When they have hands-on experiences, they regain a love for learning.

Susan is an expert on hands-on learning. That’s the way she educates her homeschool high schoolers. Her good-natured teens still love education because Susan comes up with hands-on experiences for their transcript credits.

Susan reminds us that having fun in education, makes education successful. She tells the story of teaching writing in a low-performing school. She did mystery events with her. Then her students wrote mystery stories about the event. The next testing showed her students scored significantly higher on their standardized tests, because they were now engaged and encouraged.

When she started homeschooling her kids, she decided to keep those hands-on learning principles going with her own kids education. She did not give up experiential learning even when her kids reached high school levels. Susan reminds us to bring more joy to your home through hands-on learning!

Bring more joy to your home through hands-on learning!- Susan Evans Listen to this episode of Homeschool Highschool Podcast and get lots of ideas for experiential learning in homeschool high school.

What are some hands-on learning experiences that Susan has used in her homeschool high school?

Need some ideas for experiential learning in your homeschool high school? Susan Evans is an endless fount of hands-on blessings. Remember, don’t take yourselves too seriously. Have lots of fun! You can get inspiration at her YouTube channel and website.

Here are some of Susan’s favorite ideas:

  • Science labs:
    • Animal classification wall. Susan and her family cover a wall poster board diagrammed with kingdoms, phylums, genus, species. Add photos.
    • Potato head genetics: Susan and her teens practice dominant and recessive genes with different kinds of eyes, noses and ears on their Mr. Potato Heads.
  • History:
    • Hold feasts from each location and time period: Susan finds recipes online and in library books. The family works together to cook and present the meal. They eat in period costumes. Then they follow up with period-related activities.
    • Re-enactments: Susan and her family attend Civil War and Revolutionary War re-enactments. National, state and local parks often have interpreters who do some re-enacting.
    • Plays: Susan’s family particularly enjoys Shakespeare plays during the summer when her community holds free “Shakespeare in the Park” events. They also attend other period plays.
    • Visit events and shops: Susan’s family visits antique car shows and antique shops. They learn about period cars, furniture and culture. Nothing can substitute for actually knowing what these things look like!
    • Field trips: Homeschool high schoolers never outgrow field trips. No matter where you live, there are some field trip opportunities. And given time and resources, vacations can turn into larger educational field trips. After all, ALL of life is education! Vicki, Sabrina and Kym have lots of field trip ideas for homeschool high schoolers in this episode of Homechool Highschool Podcast.
    • Parties from each decade of the 20th century: Susan’s family throws Decade parties. Everyone wears costumes and shares food and activities from the decade being studied. (Susan reminds us that right before Halloween, you can find cheap costumes.) An example of a Decade Party: For 70s party: buy a Walmart disco ball, bake a *record cake*, play music of the era with a YouTube 1970’s pop music mix.
  • Literature:
    • Re-enact scenes from family read-alouds: Susan’s homeschool high schoolers re-enact scenes from the famous literature. Her teens especially loved re-enacting their favorite scenes in The Iliad and The Odyssey.
    • Hold mystery partiers after reading mystery novels: Susan started this tradition while teaching in public schools. Her homeschool high schoolers still love reading mysteries then throwing a celebratory mystery party.
    • Have treasure hunts after reading Treasure Island or other pirate novels: Susan loves hiding treasures with clues and maps. Her teens get a kick out of the game.
    • Bible: Susan’s family acts out Bible stories. She says that over time, they have re-enacted the entire Bible!
  • Career Exploration: Practice interviewing. Susan’s homeschool high schoolers have loved 7Sisters Career Exploration curriculum and posts. Here’s a YouTube link to her sons practicing what NOT to do at a job interview.
Susan Evans. Photo used by permission.

Susan Evans. Photo used by permission.

How does a homeschool mom plan and organize hands-on activities for homeschool high school?

Susan says prayer and getting her teens involved are important! Here are her tips:

  • For planning our lessons, Susan suggests starting with prayer when she plans her subjects each year. She believes that God created our creativity, so she expects Him to give her fun ideas…and He does!
  • Give teens job to research, plan and organized hands-on activities.
  • If they drive, they can even Log these hours.
  • Don’t take yourselves too seriously. Relax and have fun!
  • Log hours for all these hands-on activities. These hours go towards leveling-up credits in a way that is fun and memorable.

Join Susan’s Treasure Vault for TONS of ideas for hands-on learning in homeschool high school. Start with encouraging posts at Susan Evans Hands-on Learning. AND catch her YouTube Channel.

HSHSP Ep 176: Hands-on Learning in Homeschool High School, Interview with Susan Evans

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

This week on HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar.

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School. This interview with Peggy Ployhar of SPED Homeschool gives inspiration, encouragement and success tips for parents of special needs teens. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolSpecialNeeds #SpecialNeedsTeens #SPEDHomeschool

 

HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

Every teen has a place in God’s kingdom, but not every teen’s journey looks alike. Some homeschool high schoolers have different learning styles, learning differences or learning disabilities. These special needs don’t mean you can’t homeschool your teen for high school. In fact, homeschooling high school might be the VERY best choice for them. You can individualize their education to:

  • Develop their strengths
  • Compensate for their weaknesses
  • Give them skills for life
  • Help them believe in God’s plans for them

Vicki is joined today by Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool to discuss help for special needs in homeschool high school.

Peggy Ployhar from SPED Homeschool

Photo used by permission.

Peggy is a long-time homeschool mom and community leader. Her 2 sons both have special needs so based on her experience with her sons, she jumped into the role of community advisor for families with special needs. That service grew until the need was clear for an organization dedicated to helping special needs families. That’s how SPED Homeschool got started, a dedicated team of homeschooling parents who are:

  • Vetting homeschool curriculum for use with special needs homeschoolers
  • Training other homeschool parents in skills for helping their special needs homeschoolers
  • Reminding parents that there’s not ONE approach that will work for all special needs homeschool high schoolers. Of course, we 7Sisters are excited about that since we’re always saying there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school.
  • Making available advice from experts

Check out SPED Homeschool’s website, and facebook pages.

SPED Homeschool

One of the most important things that Peggy learned about homeschooling high school with her special needs teens was RELATIONSHIP is more important than education. As she kept the relationship with her sons as number one priority, she was able to:

  • Stay flexible, very flexible!
  • Make wise choices for and with her teens
    • curriculum
    • goals
    • resources
  • Create an educational program that adapts as her teens grew and changed
  • Push teens graciously in their giftedness areas

Peggy tells the story of her son telling her at age 16 that he *was done* with high school. She calmed herself and worked with him to quickly set goals for meeting graduation requirements at a minimal (not college-prep) level. He blasted through his courses, took a gap year to explore and became the tech genius behind all SPED’s technology. He eventually went to college, because he felt the calling at that time and did college in his way.

Want more resources? 7Sisters has an Authoritative Guide to Out of the Box Credits for Homeschooling High School with Special Needs Teens

You’ll be SO encouraged by this episode of Homeschool CPA with our friend, Carol Topp, as she shares resources for special needs homeschoolers in co-ops.

Join Vicki and Peggy for this encouraging interview on homeschooling teens with special needs.

Want more ideas on homeschooling high school with special needs teens? Check out this video with Vicki and Peggy.


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 172: Help for Special Needs in Homeschool High School, Interview with Peggy Ployhar

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

This week on HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring.

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring. Soft skills are necessary for success during high school and after graduation for homeschool high schoolers. Here are tips for helping teens grow the soft skill of integrity. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #SoftSkillsForTeens #Skills101

HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

Vicki is joined for this interview by Lisa Nehring (of Skills 101/Life Skills for a Digital Age podcast, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network). Lisa is a 27 year veteran of homeschooling. She also owns True North Academy, a gentle Classical and Charlotte Mason approach in an online school for homeschool high schoolers that meets various needs. Lisa’s gift is helping teens develop the soft skills they need for success in life. (That’s why she started her podcast.)

Soft skills are the skills that are related to emotional and social intelligence:

  • Kindness
  • Integrity
  • Honesty
  • Politeness
  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Courage
  • Good work ethic
  • Grit (Angela Duckworth wrote a great book on grit.) Find grit goals, find something challenging and work it for several years.

Soft skills are important to develop because they are key qualities that many employers are looking for these days. Many employers have found that soft skills expertise leads to more success than simply having excellent training in the career field. Take a look at this post about what Google found about success and soft skills in its employees.

With soft skills in mind, Lisa and Vicki are discussing integrity in this podcast episode. The word *integrity* comes from the root *integer*, which means *wholeness*. Thus, integrity means being the same person the whole time. Lisa says: The person you are in your grandmother’s house, you should be all the time.

The person you are at your grandmother's house, you should be all the time. Lisa Nehring's advice about developing the soft skill of integrity. Homeschool HighSchool Podcast.

The Bible speaks about integrity in Proverbs 11:3:

The integrity of the upright guides them; but the unfaithful are destroyed by their duplicity. (Note: duplicity means *deceitfulness*…NOT being the same in all circumstances.)

How do you go about developing integrity skills in your teens?

Model integrity for your family:

  • Live out the idea that honesty is always appropriate
  • If you make a promise, keep it (as much as is possible)
    • Develop plans that help you follow through
  • Know your limits, say *no* when you need to
    • Don’t placate, when something can’t happen, be honest about it
  • Swim in your own lane, take care of your own business
  • Have the courage to set goals and work toward them
  • Live a lifestyle of gratitude
  • Live out your faith in practical ways
    • Show compassion and concern for others by investing in them, for instance:
      • friends
      • family
      • fellow Christians around the world
  • Humility (be honest and transparent with the things we need help with)
    • In other words, ask for help when you need it.

In developing integrity, realistically dealing with the digital world is vital.

  • We need to be the same person online as we are offline. This is an important topic to discuss with teens. If you need some help discussing appropriately *being real* with your homeschool high schoolers, visit our social media expert/friend, Leah Nieman.
  • At the same time, we (and our teens) need to beware of social media envy: what others are presenting on social media may not be the whole story. Lisa tells the story of when she showed pictures of her 4 little grape vines and her friends thought she had an orchard. She wasn’t intentionally being deceiving, it’s just that social media can’t really show ALL of life!

Help your teens in developing integrity by helping them learn wonder and awe.

Lisa tells the integrity story about her grandpa who farmed mint for Wrigley’s gum. He was highly respected in the local community because of his integrity. When he shook your hand it meant he was giving his word… it was going to happen.

We must remember that we can do much to invest in our homeschool high schoolers’ success and soft skills. However, we are not in charge of the outcome. God is! We raise our kids with prayer and the best modeling we can do…AND we continually place our kids in His hands.

Join Vicki and Lisa Nehring in our discussion on the soft skill of integrity. Visit Lisa Nehring’s podcast, Soft Skills 101/Life for a Digital Age, right here on Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Check out the True North Program and her True North Facebook page.

You’ll also enjoy these posts.

Flexibility and Adaptability: Interview with Vicki Tillman, of Seven Sisters

3 Ways to Help a Teen Think of Others More Than Selves


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Overcomer Movie

Life changes overnight for coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team’s state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, John must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged by the school’s principal to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth… until he crosses paths with a student struggling with her own journey.
Filled with a powerful mix of faith, a twist of humor, and a ton of heart, the Kendrick Brothers return to theaters with OVERCOMER, their newest feature following FACING THE GIANTS, FIREPROOF, COURAGEOUS, and the #1 box-office hit, WAR ROOM. The inspiring family film stars Alex Kendrick, Priscilla Shirer, Shari Rigby, Cameron Arnett, and introduces Aryn Wright-Thompson.

Opening nationwide on August 23, OVERCOMER dares to leave you filled with hope, inspired to dream, and asks the question: what do you allow to define you?

Click here to learn more!


HSHSP Ep 170: Developing Integrity Skills in Teens, Interview with Lisa Nehring

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School.

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School. Life is rarely perfect, most of the time life is simply real. But that can be really discouraging. Here's are our tips for dealing with discouragement in homeschooling high school. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #DealingWithDiscouragement

 

HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

There’s no such thing as a Pinterest-perfect life. There’s no such thing as a Pinterest-perfect mom. Not even a homeschool mom, as much as we would like to try!

Everyone of us (even your 7Sisters- who are just like you, only older) have had periods of discouragement. It’s just part of real life! Join Kym and Vicki as they get real about when life gets real and they get real discouraged. AND what they do about it.

 

Having a teenager and being a mom means there are two humans working together on homeschooling high school (or even more humans working on homeschooling high school). Real humans sometimes have times of discouragement. We shouldn’t ignore the feelings, we should acknowledge it and then decide what to do about it.

Kym reminds us the first thing to do when feeling discouragement is: PRAY! When we tell God what our lives are like, we are being real and honest (like the Psalms). Then it is wise to sit and listen, allowing God’s creativity to work in our souls so we find the creativity to handle the discouragement in a positive, helpful way.

Do you feel discouraged even in your prayer? God cares. Talk to him about that. He wants our relationship, our honest relationship. Lean into the discouragement in God’s presence, even if it feels *not good enough*…be real with God!

Go for a walk. This can be one of the best ways to pray! It can also be a great way to allow your creativity to happen or simply allow your brain to rest and notice the beautiful things God has made. Here are some other mindful things you can do.

Do some deep breathing. Allow yourself to breathe in, asking God for help. Then exhale, thanking him for help. The oxygen will lower your stress hormones and help you physically feel calmer. Download Vicki’s freebie guide to deep breathing: Progressive Relaxation.

Tell someone you trust and ask for a *processing session*. Tell them they don’t need to fix it, just listen…and maybe agree: *That’s really hard!*

Practice self-awareness. Vicki talks about examining the 3W’s of life:

Listen to what is going on for your teen. Don’t practice a full frontal attack at what he/she is doing or thinking wrong. Instead, take a walk or drive together and just listen. Then ask them to talk out the process, and ask wha they believe the outcomes will be. Sometimes the teens will recalibrate themselves. However, sometimes, we must allow them to make their own mistakes. (Just like God sometimes does with us.) Then TRUST God to be the healer and redeemer our teen needs and TRUST God’s infinite love for our kids.

Remember: It is better to get out of God’s way and stay where we belong: on our needs in prayer. And get some prayer support from friends you can trust.

Join Vicki and Kym for an encouraging discussion about dealing with discouragement.

You’ll also be blessed by this post:

1 Powerful Tool for Good Relationship with Homeschool Teens

 

 

 


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Bridgeway Academy!

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HSHSP Ep 168: Dealing with Discouragement in Homeschool High School

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

This week on HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School.

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School. Discussion of the different homeschooling methods for high school. #HomeschoolHighSchoolPodcast #HomeschoolHighschool

HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

Sometimes we get questions about the 7SistersHomeschool.com’s philosophy of homeschooling. What is our educational philosophy? Wait for it…

Let’s start with these 2 vital concepts!

If you’ve known Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for any time at all (or our Sisters, Marilyn, Allison and Sara), you know our most important educational philosophy concept: There’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school!

There’s the right way for your child, for this year; for your family, for right now. But needs, goals and interests change. So that leads to a second educational philosophy concept: We have to be flexible if we want a healthy homeschool high school!

Now, let’s look at the different philosophies of homeschooling high school on an *educational philosophy continuum*.

What are the influential philosophies in homeschooling high school? There are a number of educational philosophies, so it helps to visualize them on a continuum from highly structured and rigid to and free-formed and flexible.

The truth is that in practice, most of us homeschooling parents really are *eclectic*. While we might like a certain philosophy, we usually find that in real life we need to mix and match.

  • We might need a teen to take a college class (highly structured) or an online class (usually highly structured)
  • We might want to take some Charlotte Mason approach classes through online programs like Dreaming Spires Home Learning (listen to our friend Kat’s discussions with Vicki about writing research papers, teaching Shakespeare and homeschooling in Britain).
  • We might find that our co-op classes lean toward the Classical model.
  • We might give our teens time each week to explore their own interests and have them log hours to earn an elective or Career Exploration credit.

These are all great ways to homeschool high school with an eclectic educational philosophy.

Back to the continuum: Different homeschool high school educational philosophies live on a continuum from rigid to flexible. Here are a few examples (remembering that there’s not a right or wrong way to homeschool high school).

On the highly-structured end of the continuum there’s School at Home

School at Home is a format that follows a set program (like Keystone or K12), with online classes similar to a classroom format. We sometimes call this *school in a box*.

Good thing: This is a great format for teens who love structure and following formats and rules.

Pitfall: Teens who don’t like lots of structure, or being slowed down by a *classroom setting*, will wrestle with boredom.

Also structured is Classical Education

One concept behind Classical Education is creating an infrastructure of learning. The Classical model of the comes from the ancient philosophers like Aristotle and Socrates and became the standard educational model of the Middle Ages. In Classical education, Latin is the foundation of all education and follows the structure of first learning Latin Grammar, then Rhetoric, then Logic.

Good thing: Homeschoolers who love Latin and critical thinking will LOVE Classical education. It really is a format that develops thinking minds.

Pitfall: For teens who are not linear thinkers (ADHD, creative thinkers), this model might be tougher.

Less structured is Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason’s educational format is based on reading, narrative, writing, beauty, observation and experience. It is a real-book and real-experience type of program. Usually the high-school level course have lots of rigor in the writing and reading components at the minimum.

Good thing: Teens learn to appreciate and notice beauty and become articulate in their communication styles.

Pitfall: For teens who do poorly with dictation and narration, they might feel lost.

Moderately structured is Goal-Driven Homeschooling

This is 7SistersHomeschool.com’s model (although we don’t believe in getting ulcers over anything formattish). When teens learn goal setting in high school, they have an important tool for success. They will need to be able to set goals through college, career, and life in general!

We believe that homeschooling high schoolers benefit by learning to set goals, so we work alongside our teens to help them set 2 types of goals:

Long term goals: What we want for them (and what they want for themselves) by the time they graduate- what kind of person do they want to become and life preparation do they need?

Short term goals: What we need to accomplish each year in order to meet those long-term goals.

Good thing: What our teens like about goal-driven education is that they know where they are going. What do they need for graduation? Career preparation? College preparation? Life-skills preparation? On the other hand, what if teens don’t learn to set goals? It’s like when you get in your car and start driving but don’t know where you’re going, you end up somewhere you don’t know…

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to goal setting might begin to feel pressured by the goals. Remember to be flexible, not perfectionistic.

NOTE: We also have a firm philosophy that homeschool high school curriculum should include no-busywork and be adaptable to different levels of rigor. Here’s a post explaining our curriculum philosophy.

Relaxed Homeschooling, Lifeschooling, Unschooling are on the far-end of the relaxed side of the continuum.

These are the educational philosophies on the relaxed end of the spectrum. The homeschooling high schooler chooses an interest and explores it in an in-depth, student-directed, delight-driven manner. There is not a structure. The idea is that if a teen is busy exploring a gift or interest, education will be an automatic outgrowth of the experience.

Good thing: These teens tend to be all-in, really invested in their interests. They know how to become subject matter experts in their giftings.

Pitfall: Teens who aren’t used to structure must learn to fit themselves into the box when they get their first jobs, or find a career that fits their learning style.

To wrap things up, here are some words of wisdom and advice:

  • When you think about what your family actually needs, you’ll probably find that you have needs for a bit of several of these styles.
  • No matter which way you homeschool, God is in charge of the outcome. Not you, God is in charge of the outcome. (Our fellow podcasters, Fletch and Kendra of Homeschooling in Real Life, often say this and they are correct.)
  • As our Sister Kym always says: Pray first, last and always.
  • If your homeschool high school philosophy is prayer oriented, your homeschool program is on the right track.
  • No matter what you plan, God might have another idea. Remember: A mom’s mind plans her way but God directs her path.

REMEMBER, there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school. Be happy with what fits your family best! And your teens best! And be ready to trash your method (or curriculum) anytime it is not working for you. We have so many choices!

Here’s a fun episode from our friend Melanie Wilson of Homeschool Sanity Podcast. It’s her Top 40 episodes and you’ll find information there to help empower you for homeschooling success.

Want some more information on Goal Setting?

5 Easy and Important Steps to Goal Setting for Homeschool High School

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PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
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HSHSP Ep 163: Different Philosophies of Homeschooling High School

HSHSP Ep 160: How to Teach Human Development in Homeschool Co-op

This week on HSHSP Ep 160: How to Teach Human Development in Homeschool Co-op!

HSHSP Ep 160: How to Teach Human Development in Homeschool Co-op. Co-op is a great place to teach life preparation courses like Human Development. Here are teaching tips. #HomeschoolHighSchool #HumanDevelopment #HomeschoolCoOp

HSHSP Ep 160: How to Teach Human Development in Homeschool Co-op

One of the 7Sisters’ favorite courses for their homeschool high schoolers is Human Development. One of the 7Sisters’ favorite ways to teach Human Development is homeschool co-op.

Human Development is an important life-preparation course for teens. It teaches them the ways grow and change from womb to old age: physically, cognitively and socially.

Why is it important to learn Human Development? (Especially because it is not required for graduation.)

  • 9 month old who gains object permanence and remember toys when you hid them under a blanket
  • 2 year olds say *NO*
  • teens question many things
  • old people tell the same stories over and over

Human Development may recorded on the homeschool transcript as (ask your advisor, if you have one, the way your accountability organization wants to have it recorded):

Human Development adds *SPARKLE* to the homeschool transcript (which can give teens an edge if they are applying for a more competitive college).

We've found that Human Development is a course that helps homeschool high schoolers build perspective-taking skills and a sense of compassion for others, especially those in a different phase of life.

Here are some of our favorite Human Development activities we’ve done in our homeschool high school co-ops:

  • Interview moms about the teens’ birth stories. Then share those stories with the group.
  • Act out the different forms of play and have the rest of the class guess which play-type they were demonstrating.
  • Have teens interview each other: What is going well in life?
  • Have teens interview and evaluate the moms: What are they doing well?
  • Interview their grandparents about their life story.
  • Bring in visitors, such as toddlers and watch them play.
  • Bring teens to the mall to people watch.

7Sisters has lesson plans that are specifically geared toward homeschool high school co-ops with video clips and more activities. Check them out!

We’ve found that Human Development is a course that helps homeschool high schoolers build perspective-taking skills and a sense of compassion for others, especially those in a different phase of life.

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for a fun discussion about teaching Human Development in co-op. You might also like these posts:

Suggested Syllabus for Human Development from a Christian Worldview

Fun & Useful Elective: Combining Human Development and Early Childhood Education

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
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  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
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  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
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HSHSP Ep 160: How to Teach Human Development in Homeschool Co-op

HSHSP Ep 143: Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers

This week on HSHSP Ep 143: Financial Literacy for Homeschool High schoolers.

HSHSP Ep 143: Financial Literacy for Homeschool Highschoolers. Teens need life-skills math of Financial Literacy to be well prepared for adulting.

HSHSP Ep 143: Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers

How do you go about preparing homeschool high schoolers for managing money throughout their lives? Financial Literacy is a life skills math credit that many teens will use WAY more often than their high school math. Join Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Eagle, the Seeing Eye puppy for a fun discussion of Financial Literacy curriculum.

Back in 2008, when the economy crashed, some economists believed that poor personal financial management (including too much mortgage debt) was part of the problem. In reaction to this, many state education departments began to require that high school transcripts include Consumer Math so that teen could have at least basic money management skills.

But Consumer Math might not be enough for many teens. If they want real-life preparation for not just money, but for making financial decisions, for planning and for other financial considerations, teens need more. They need Financial Literacy.

A penny saved is a penny earned is just the beginning. Give your teens financial skills for a lifetime.

So, what is the difference between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy?

  • Consumer Math covers the basics such as creating a budget and balancing a checkbook.
  • Financial Literacy covers Consumer Math PLUS planning for the future, finding the right insurances, banking, credit and more.

There are several good financial training courses. We, of course, like 7Sisters’ Financial Literacy because it covers all the bases of Financial Literacy courses but also trains students on how to find information (and where to avoid information). It is an interactive, internet-based curriculum that teens love…and actually use. Homeschool high schoolers finish the course with a life financial plan.

As soon as 7Sisters’ published our Financial Literacy course, our teens began using it and teaching it in our local homeschool group classes. The curriculum was vetted by the teens, who gave valuable feedback on how they learn best. Those teens are now adults and still using the skills they learned from their Financial Literacy course.

Your teens will benefit from taking Financial Literacy, but don’t take our word for it. Check out these posts from 7Sister Sara’s sons Luke and Joel. You’ll also enjoy this Dollars and Cents Podcast episode on How to Teach Kids about Managing Money.

 

Interactive Financial Literacy Course: Why it is Awesome & How to Use it

HSHSP Ep 143: Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers