Homeschool Grades | Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Crystal discusses the ins and outs of homeschool grading. And hopefully, by the end of the show, you’ll better understand how to grade your homeschooler and come away with a few tips to keep it all organized. | #homeschoolpodcast #podcast #homeschool #education #homeschooling #homeschoolHomeschool Grades: How to Assign and Track Your Learner’s Progress

 

In this episode, Crystal discusses the ins and outs of homeschool grades. And hopefully, by the end of the show, you’ll better understand how to grade your homeschooler and come away with a few tips to keep it all organized.

How to Assign and Track Your Learner’s Progress

Episode #35 –  So, you’ve decided to homeschool your kiddos. Everything is ready- from the best homeschool curriculum to the perfect learning space in your home.  You’ve got all your bases covered! Or, you thought, until someone asks how you’ll grade your homeschooler. That’s when it hits- how are homeschoolers graded? If this sounds familiar, or you just want to be sure you’re doing things correctly- then you’re in the right place!

A perspective on homeschool grades

Any experienced homeschooling parent will tell you one main perk of homeschooling is its flexibility.  Yes, there are requirements in each state that may direct how many hours you have to educate your child, and there may even be requirements specific to what grading system you must use; however, most often, parents are free to decide what best suits their family’s needs.  So, evaluating your homeschooler’s progress comes down to one central question: to grade or not to grade?

Why does grading matter?

The answer to this question depends on a couple of factors.  First, if your state requires letters or percentage grades for homeschooled students, there is no way around it; you must grade your homeschoolers.  If there are no specific requirements, whether to grade or not becomes more of a personal choice.

What about college?

Many homeschooling families choose to wait until high school before introducing a structured grading system, and this is because their students will be entering college in a few short years.  Implementing grades at this level helps colleges assess the student’s competency and readiness for college-level learning.  However, for those not keen on switching over to formal grades, a grading system is not necessarily the “golden standard” for homeschoolers entering college.

The ‘how and when’ of grading

As highlighted above, grading your homeschooler is often a personal choice.  If grading is what feels right, then go for it.  But it is essential to find a grading system that works best for you and your students.

Luckily, there are several different grading systems to choose from.  Some options include:

  • Grading percentages: This system is a 0-100 percent grading scale, often used along with letter grades.
  • Letter grades: This option includes using grades from A to F.
  • Standard-referenced grades: This system compares students with other students using a letter grade (this system may be more difficult with smaller groups of students).
  • Mastery level: This grading system uses terms such as “masters” or “passers” to show students’ comprehension of a subject.
  • Standard scale: This option uses pass or fails only.
  • Absolute standards: Parents can compare their student’s learning and work against the established competency levels (most school districts provide expected learning goals for each grade level, which parents can use for this grading system).
  • Narrative grading: This system includes a written assessment of student learning and allows for personalized tracking.

For grading art and other subjective assignments, options include:

  • Focus on other concepts like art appreciation or comprehension of a topic, which may include additional parts to an assignment, such as narratives and oral presentations to demonstrate knowledge.
  • Grade according to effort and following directions.
  • Simple rubrics that include the student’s input to encourage self-reflection on learning.
  • Standard grading using a 1-4 scale (4= exceeds expectations, and 1 basic).

How to record and track your homeschooler’s grade

Fortunately, as with grading systems, there are plenty of options for logging and tracking grades:

  • Journals
  • Flow sheets
  • Rubrics
  • Spreadsheets
  • Websites

Listen in to learn why grading matters and options for grading. Some examples include percentage and letter grades, pass or fail, standard, and narrative grading.  And while these grading systems are easy to apply to subjects such as English and math, a different approach is often needed for more subjective lessons, such as art. Fortunately, there are many options for grading subjects like art as well.  Lastly, once you’ve decided which way to go for grading, there are great options for tracking your student’s progress.  From journals to websites, there are plenty of choices to keep everything organized, making it easy to find when you need it.

Resources:

Psychological Effects of Grades on Students – Edsys Blog

Applying to College as a Homeschool Student: What to Know | Applying to College | U.S. News (usnews.com)

Art Teacher Tips: How do you grade art? (artclasscurator.com)

Join Crystal and her guests each week as they bring relevant information to equip you, stories to encourage you, and content to inspire you. You don’t have to go it alone, tune in to the Military Homeschool Podcast, and be energized in your military homeschooling journey!

How to listen:

  1. Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, or Stitcher
  2. Subscribe to your favorite podcast listening app
  3. Or listen right here (just scroll down)

Got questions or comments, or have show topic ideas? Contact Crystal via email at militaryhomeschoolpodcast@gmail.com or connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

 Please subscribe, follow, and share with all of your military homeschooling friends!

Encouragement for Moms Homeschooling through Military Deployment

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week Crystal Niehoff shares some encouragement and inspiration for moms.Episode #28- For the military spouse who is trying to hold the family together on the homefront, deployments are challenging, to say the least. Add homeschooling to the mix, and it can be positively overwhelming. On this episode, Crystal shares encouragement and advice from milspouses who have been there for the mom who is homeschooling while her spouse is deployed.

Homeschooling provides consistency and stability in the midst of military life. Plus, it offers flexibility. Want to travel or relocate temporarily during a deployment? No problem. Your homeschool goes with you wherever you go. Your kids won’t have to change schools, adjust to new teachers, or struggle to make friends with new classmates mid-year.  It also allows your children to be available for those precious moments when dad is able to call or facetime with them, even if it’s after bedtime or during a normal school day. Added bonus- the time spent with your children while your spouse is deployed will bond you all closer together.

But home-educating your kids while solo parenting can be draining and leave you feeling like you’re in survival mode for the nine months or year that your spouse is away.  Listen in to find encouragement and some workable solutions to help you homeschool through the next deployment.

Join Crystal and her guests each week as they bring relevant information to equip you, stories to encourage you, and content to inspire you. You don’t have to go it alone; tune in to the Military Homeschool Podcast and be energized in your military homeschooling journey!

How to listen:

    1. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, or Stitcher
    2. Subscribe on your favorite podcast listening app
    3. Or listen right here (just scroll down)

Got questions, comments, or have show topic ideas? Contact Crystal via email at militaryhomeschoolpodcast@gmail.com or connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

Please subscribe, follow, and share with all of your military homeschooling friends!

 

Deschooling: What, Why, and How (Replay)

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Listen in to learn more about deschooling as a way to reframe and reset the joy of learning for both you and your child.Episode #22 – On this week’s episode, learn how you can use deschooling to reframe and reset the joy of learning for you and your child.

Deschooling is the process of detaching oneself from traditional schooling methods and structures in order to allow for more creativity, freedom, self-expression, and peace. This is done over a period of time, during which you do little formal school work in order to reset your child’s natural love of learning.

Deschooling can be done in a variety of ways, depending on your needs and preferences as well as the needs of your child.  You may also find that during the deschooling process,  you adjust your understanding of and approach to how your child learns best. During this time, your child isn’t expected to complete worksheets, study from a textbook, or sit to listen to boring lectures. Deschooling is a time of reframing our ideas of how, when, and where learning takes place.

Some ways to deschool:

  • Read to your child often.
  • Play educational board games.
  • Include your children in everyday life.
  • Get outside! Go for walks, hike a nature trail, bike ride, play at the park, go swimming.
  • Attend concerts, plays, art exhibits, and sporting events.
  • Go to the museum, zoo, or aquarium.
  • Make frequent trips to the library.
  • Create or build.
  • Watch documentaries and educational TV shows and videos.

Learning doesn’t require textbooks, worksheets, or a classroom. Learning can happen anywhere, day or night. And the great thing about homeschooling is that we know that our children are always learning! As parent/ teacher we can allow our children the freedom to learn in whatever mode suits them best, even if that means on the couch or floor, standing or moving around, frequent breaks, and incorporating hands-on practice.

Listen in to learn more about deschooling as a way to reframe and reset the joy of learning for both you and your child.

Resources:

Teach Kids Math at the Grocery Store

Tips for Deschooling

What, When, Why & How of Deschooling

Deschooling: Starting Out Right at Home

 

Sponsor:

Upper Iowa University is committed to providing quality, affordable education to service members and their families. Service members, spouses and dependents qualify for tuition savings with their Military Family Grant on undergraduate and graduate degrees.

UIU programs are available online, on campus and at one of their learning centers across the country. Work one-on-one with an advisor to reach your educational goals. Learn more at UIU.EDU/MilitaryHomeSchool

 

Join Crystal and her guests each week as they bring relevant information to equip you, stories to encourage you, and content to inspire you. You don’t have to go it alone, tune in to the Military Homeschool Podcast, and be energized in your military homeschooling journey!

How to listen:

  1. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, or Stitcher
  2. Subscribe on your favorite podcast listening app
  3. Or listen right here (just scroll down)

Got questions, comments, or have show topic ideas? Contact Crystal via email at militaryhomeschoolpodcast@gmail.com or connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

 

Please subscribe, follow, and share with all of your military homeschooling friends!