HSHSP Ep 141: Handling Difficult People During the Holidays

This week on HSHSP Ep 141: Handling Difficult People During the Holidays!

HSHSP Ep 141: Handling Difficult People at Holiday Events. Plan for success in dealing with challenging friends and family members at Christmas get-togethers.

HSHSP Ep 141: Handling Difficult People During the Holidays

Dreading those tough moments at holiday gatherings when someone makes everyone tense, irritated or embarrassed?  It’s not just you. There are obnoxious people everywhere. However, we don’t need to sacrifice our family’s health (mental or otherwise), to appease the folks who make life tense. Join Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Eagle (the Seeing Eye Puppy) for a comfortable chat about uncomfortable people.

When planning for that big get-together, but stressing because you know *Irritating Uncle George* is going to be there, here are some valuable questions to ask yourself:

What’s the goal of the gathering?

  • If it’s the goal to have a picture perfect event, we might need to downgrade that goal when there are difficult people in the mix. Better to be realistic and unsurprised than to simply wish he’d behave and be miserable. Listen to this episode on Realistic Expectations.
  • If the goal is to honor the traditions of the family, how can you discuss with each person ways to keep that tradition-honoring time pleasant?

What are the deal breakers for you and your family?

  • Ask your family members, what are their deal breakers? Those are the places you need to work together to come up with a creative, Christlike boundary or solution.

How flexible are your family members with their deal breakers and expectations?

  • Ask your family members what they can and are willing to adjust.

What are your internal Rules for the Universe?

We all have a set of Rules for the way the Universe should run. If we stubbornly try to cling to our Rules for the Universe, and the universe isn’t running by our rules, we will make ourselves sick.

Take for instance, Vicki’s Rule: *Everyone I care about should be okay all the time*. Unfortunately for Vicki, she can’t control that. She has to leave everyone’s okay-ness in God’s hands. (He going to run the universe the way He sees best, anyway- regardless of our Rules.)

What are YOUR Rules for the Universe? Some of our favorites are (and we must give up on):

  • Everyone I care about must be part of our traditions, so everyone must be present with me.
  • Everyone should behave like a Norman Rockwell painting.
  • Everyone should be upbeat and happy all through the holidays.

Difficult People Coming to Your Family Gatherings This Christmas? Tips for setting boundaries and adjusting expectations. Homeschool Highschool Podcast Ep 141.

What do we do when there is a difficult people present in our family, so will make the gathering difficult?

Ask yourself: Is it necessary for that person to attend if they are dangerous to the well-being and safety of the rest of the group? If the person is not a safe person, must they come? Think about that seriously. The idea that all people must be present at important holiday events is simply one of those internal Rules for the Universe.

Is it necessary for us to suck it up and say nothing difficult people or do we confront at that time of behavior?

  • For people with Predictable Obnoxious Behaviors (POBs).
    • Discuss those with the person ahead of time.
  • For people with Unpredictable Bad Behaviors (UBBs).
    • Gently pull that person aside and let them know the way things go at your house.

Remember your own stress points, ask yourself: Can I download/delegate any of them?

Remember to:

Gathering with folks is important at Christmas but we are healthier when we have addressed questions about the ways we’ll handle trouble-making people at the events.

Do your teens need to vent about those obnoxious folks? Give them a cathartic writing assignment: Holiday Family Narratives.

Enjoy this empowering chat with Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Seeing Eye Puppy, Eagle. And enjoy these posts:

Homeschool Writing Project: The Holidays are the Perfect Time to Write a Family Narrative!

 

HSHSP Ep 141: Handling Difficult People During the Holidays

HSHSP Ep 140: Homeschooler Becomes Podcaster, Interview with Vikings Podcaster Noah Tetzner

This week on HSHSP Ep 140: Homeschooler Becomes Podcaster, Interview with Vikings Podcaster Noah Tetzner.

HSHSP Ep 140: Homeschooler Becomes Podcaster, Interview with Vikings Podcaster Noah Tetzner Log history hours with expert interviews on the History of Vikings Podcast. Great interview with podcaster, Noah Tetzner.

HSHSP Ep 140: Homeschooler Becomes Podcaster, Interview with Vikings Podcaster Noah Tetzner

We love to chat with homeschoolers who are making the most of homeschooling high school! This interview with The History of Vikings Podcast’s Noah Tetzner is a great example!

Noah Tetzner, The History of Vikings Podcast

photo used with permission

The History of Vikings Podcast is popular podcast, making it to iTune’s *New and Noteworthy* recognition with 100 reviews.

Noah is 17 years old, he homeschooled for his whole like (with a brief 2 years in traditional school, which he found wasn’t the best use of his time). He’s now a junior-year homeschooler. Noah’s mom has given Noah and his siblings lots of the common homeschool experiences: co-op, exploring interests, developing skills, personal development. Noah says that his mom listens to his input in his educational process.

The History of Vikings Podcast is a popular Viking age or Norse related experts. He has interviewed experts from Oxford and other universities. Really! A homeschool high schooler interviewing Oxford, Harvard and Yale professors.

History of Vikings Podcast

Episodes cover real, expert information on topics like:

  • Viking armor
  • Viking militaristic detatils
  • Viking lifestyle
  • Viking language
  • Roles of women in Viking culture
  • Influence of Norse mythology on J.R.R. Tolkien’s writing

Noah was willing to contact these experts because he loves history and wants to share his love of history with his friends. He knew that podcasts are a fun way to learn as opposed to simply reading books.

Noah loves podcasts and listens to many of them. He noticed there wasn’t a podcast on Vikings that shared information from actual experts. So he decided to start his own. He learned about (and is earning homeschool high school transcript credit for, by the way):

  • Format
  • Recording process and technology
  • Equipment
  • Art
  • Editing

Noah credits homeschooling for help in getting the courage to invite world-renowned experts for the podcast. As a homeschooler, he was comfortable with talking to all ages and types of people. He also credits his parent for believing in him and investing in his interests.

Noah is blessing anyone interested in Vikings, building a powerful transcript, and having irreplaceable life experiences.

  • Viking fun-facts from Noah:
  • Vikings valued personal hygiene and bathed each week at least
  • Vikings traded around the world, even trading with the Byzantines
  • They didn’t wear horned helmets

Homeschool moms and teens: Listen to The History of Vikings podcast with Noah Tetzner. You’re going to love it!

You’ll also love his YouTube channel with companion videos for the podcast: The History of Vikings YouTube.

Want some ideas for ways to turn Viking studies into a homeschool transcript credit?

Listen to this episode of Homeschool Highschool Podcast on creative ways to earn history credits.

3 Ways to Earn Character-Forming World History Credit

3 Terrific Transcript Reasons for Learning World History WITH Philosophy

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HSHSP Ep 140: Homeschooler Becomes Podcaster, Interview with Vikings Podcaster Noah Tetzner

HSHSP Ep 139: How Homeschoolers Find Success in College, Interview with Kendall Smythe

This week on HSHSP Ep 139: How Homeschoolers Find Success in College, Interview with Kendall Smythe.

HSHSP Ep 139: How Homeschoolers Find Success in College, Interview with Kendall Smythe. How to have success in college.

HSHSP Ep 139: How Homeschoolers Find Success in College, Interview with Kendall Smythe

Got a homeschool high schooler headed to college? You’ll love this interview with Kendall Smythe, homeschool graduate and in her senior year at University of Delaware!

Kendall is a Psychology major with second major in Health and Wellness, as well as captain of the UD club women’s ice hockey team. She’s in the midst of applying to graduate school Sports Psychology programs, as well as her studies and sports.

She invested in her homeschool high school success (and terrific transcript) by exploring her interests. She loved sports so started in high school hockey when she and her twin, Carlie, realized that hockey was one of the few sports they hadn’t tried. When they tried it, they found they had found their sports-favorite! Both have played through college on the UD women’s team.

Kendall joined Sabrina and her mom, Kym, for a candid interview. Here are her thoughts about the ups and downs of homeschooling high school as well as tips for success in college.

What she wished was better in her homeschool high school:

  • Would have liked to have better SAT prep and test-taking skills prep

In homeschool high school, she loved:

  • Group classes with syllabi which helped her prepare for college schedules and independent study
  • Time management skills (with her busy schedule in high school, she had to learn good time management)
  • Self-discipline (Her mom is ADHD and had a hard time staying on top of things as well as older sister being sick, so she found she could manage herself well.)
  • Accountability of the local homeschool umbrella school classes, teachers and advisors
  • Opportunities for leadership skills-development and extracurriculars at her local homeschool umbrella schools
  • Strong transcript despite her SAT (she’s a poor test-taker, so she entered through their SEED scholarship program)

For college success, Kendall suggests:

She doesn’t usually tell people she homeschooled high school because it doesn’t come up

  • Find a scholarship program if you can
  • Join organizations on campus
  • Seek the opportunities you want yourself, be assertive
    • No one is going to do the work of college success for you, you get to do it yourself
  • Ask in your department for experiences (volunteer in research lab or other opportunities)
  • Network, network, network!!
  • Manage your time well

Listen in to this delightful interview with Kendall Smythe, her mom (Kym) and Sabrina and get even more tips! You’ll also love these helpful posts.

The priorities Mrs. T (Vicki) taught Kendall in homeschool high school are in this post.

Tips for Academic Success in College

College Success Tips from Kendall’s Sister, Carlie

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HSHSP Ep 139: How Homeschoolers Find Success in College, Interview with Kendall Smythe

HSHSP Ep 138: Teens and Depression

This week on HSHSP Ep 138: Teens and Depression.

HSHSP Ep 138: Teens and Depression. Even homeschool high schoolers can get depressed. Here's what to do.

HSHSP Ep 138: Teens and Depression

We wish it wasn’t true but it is. Many teens experience depression at one time or another. Even homeschool high schoolers in a nurturing environment may have a depressive bout. Depression is not something we want to ignore. Join Vicki for a discussion on depression in teens.

Here are some causes of depression in teens:

Pressures of holidays: If there are too many activities or performances, too many relatives they feel stressed about, too much pressure, teens can feel overwhelmed and feel depressed.

Biology: Teens have many hormonal swings and other physiological changes that can make the neurotransmitter serotonin drops. Serotonin is one the brain’s chemicals in charge of mood, energy, focus, hopefulness, appetite and sleep. If serotonin deeps, teens feel depressed.

Stressors of life: High schoolers feel pressure to figure out their future, perform well, get along with family and friends. Sometimes those things get stressful (they don’t know what they should do after graduation, they feel like they can’t do well enough with academics or extracurriculars, the fight with friends or family…). Too many stressors for too long can cause depression.

Too much cortisol: Some teens are naturally anxious. Their bodies produce too much cortisol, a stress hormone. Cortisol is great when they need an extra boost of energy to run fast when a lion is chasing them. But most of the time, there’s no lion so the cortisol sits in their body and makes them feel anxious. Too much cortisol for too long causes dips in serotonin, then you guessed it- depressed mood.

Poor lifestyle: Adolescents are notorious for poor lifestyle. Not enough sleep, too much junk food, lots of negative self-talk, too many stressors. These can work together in a perfect personal storm to cause depression.

Most of the time, depressed mood only lasts a few days then teens bounce back.

Sometimes the bounce back doesn’t bounce back and the depression doesn’t pass. If a teen feels depressed mood for more than a few weeks, clinical depression levels can set in. The difficult thing is: Teens (especially males) will rarely say, “I feel depressed”. You have to observe it for yourself.

Depression in adolescents often looks like a combination of these things:

Lethargy- gaming excessively, bingeing on YouTube or Netflix, social media bingeing, sitting around doing nothing

Loss of interest in the things they would have normally like- *got tired of ___*, *don’t like___ anymore*, *nah, I don’t want to do ___*

Sleep disruption- Homeschool high schoolers may sleep all day and stay up till 3 or 4 or some can’t sleep at all. (Get some great tips from this episode on stress and teens with Marianna Chambers.)

Appetite changes- You will notice that your teen has a loss of appetite or don’t notice they are hungry. Or you might catch them binge eating carbohydrates.

Urge to self-harm- Adolescents with very low serotonin levels often have the urge for cutting or other self-harm; either with no intent to suicide or suicidal ideation (thinking about suicide).

NOTE: If there is active suicidal ideation and they say they know how they’d do it, go right to the hospital to be evaluated. Don’t mess around with this even if they get angry at you. It’s better to risk their irritation than lose your teen. Adolescents can be impulsive when they are depressed.

Sadness- Some teens won’t report feeling sad. It’s as if they aren’t able to identify it for themselves. However if you give them a verbal *Happy-Sad* scale, they will often report fairly accurately. Ask them: “On a scale of 1-10, 1o is the best you ever felt and 1 is suicidal, what number would you give today? What is the highest and the lowest number from last week?” Numbers of 1-3 are high concerns.

What to do if your homeschool high schooler is depressed:

Get them some counseling. It helps. Insurance usually covers cognitive-behavioral and other therapies. I have worked as a mental health counselor for decades, so I know the good results. Sometimes teens are irritated at their parents for bringing them to the first session, but I generally win them over and they leave with tools that will quickly help them notice improvement. Counseling for teen depression varies but often we are looking at 1-10 sessions. It’s worth the investment.

Take them to the family doctor. You want to make sure something else physical isn’t going on. I’ve seen thyroid issues, PMS and anemia cause depressed feelings. If there are no other causes and counseling isn’t breaking the depression alone, sometimes doctor with suggest an SSRI to add to the counseling. This is a therapeutic medication that helps the brain heal the serotonin levels (it is not a mask of symptoms, but a healing agent- kind of like taking iron for healing anemia).

What mom can do that really helps:

  • Be with your teen. Take them for drives in the car (without earbuds). Take them for hikes or simple walks- mood enhancer
  • Get rid of junk food and drinks. Healthy foods like colorful fruits and vegetables, probiotic foods like yogurt, dairy and poultry all help the brain make serotonin.
  • Teach them deep breathing. Oxygen lowers cortisol which allows the serotonin to bounce back. Here’s a freebie how-to from my coaching site: Progressive Relaxation. 
  • Sleep hygiene. Teens need adequate sleep. If they get proper sleep, it helps the brain to heal. Here’s a post with how-to get sleep under control.
  • SAD Light for Seasonal Depression. Get a full-spectrum light to heal seasonal depression. (I personally love my light box. I don’t have full Seasonal Affective Disorder, but the gray days of winter make me feel mopey and the lightbox helps.) Here’s a post from Mayo Clinic on finding a lightbox.
  • Positive friends. God made us for community. They need laughter with friends. Even if you have to cook something up and make it happen.

Join Vicki for a discussion of teens and depression. Also you’ll be blessed by these posts from our friends.

Homeschool Sanity: Homeschooling Through Hormones.

LeahNieman.com for the relationship of technology to depression in teens.

HSHSP Ep 138: Teens and Depression

HSHSP Ep 137: What Are Umbrella Schools for Homeschool High School?

This week on HSHSP Ep 137: What Are Umbrella Schools for Homeschool High School?

HSHSP Ep 137: What Are Umbrella Schools for Homeschool High School? Otherwise known as hybrid schools, university-model schools or charter schools. Either way they are good resources for many families.

HSHSP Ep 137: What Are Umbrella Schools for Homeschool High School?

What kind of support is there for homeschooling high school families? There is so much these days. One of the most valuable supports is the umbrella school.

Join Sabrina, Kym and 7SistersHomeschool’s Marilyn as they discuss umbrella schools.

Other names for umbrella schools include: charter schools, university-model schools, hybrid schools, one-day schools.

7SistersHomeschool’s birth came out of Mt. Sophia Academy, an umbrella school registered as a non-public school in Delaware. Since its inception in 1996, Marilyn has served as principal, Vicki was academic advisor for 18 years, Sabrina, Kym, Sara, and Allison have served as teachers and other leadership positions.

Umbrella schools are generally designed to help homeschooling high schoolers as:

  • A liaison with the state Department of Education
  • Accountability
  • Transcript service
  • Academic and career advising
  • Optional on-campus courses
  • Support groups

When families are part of an umbrella school, the school is support for you, but you are still the in-charge person. They are not homeschooling your children FOR you but WITH you.

If you are a member of an umbrella school, be sure to

In the group classes, teachers usually provide a syllabus for course. This will provide information on assignments, tests, projects, along with texts and grading scales.

Tips for parents who are teaching umbrella school courses.

  • Help set a friendly and inclusive atmosphere.
  • Set atmosphere of brining new teens in an accepting them.
  • Teach teens how to do classroom discussion, explain how it works. (Sabrina has some great ideas, listen in!)
  • Use *participation chips* to encourage classroom discussion (Sabrina and Kym give out poker chips for participating, which give teens extra credit OR teens must earn X-number of chips each class.)
  • Talk about expectations on the first day.
  • Talk about respect of each other, adults, facilities.
  • Train teens to initiate questions on homework and assignments, rather than parents. This is a great life skills.

Join Sabrina, Kym and Marilyn for this helpful discussion on homeschooling high school with umbrella schools. You’ll also enjoy these posts:

5 Steps for Catching Up When Your Homeschool High School is Behind.

Helping Teens Learn to Use a Syllabus

How and Why to Write a Syllabus

How and Why to Write Course Descriptions

HSHSP Ep 137: What Are Umbrella Schools for Homeschool High School?

HSHSP Ep 136: Teaching Teens to Cope with Stress, Interview with Marianna Chambers

This week on HSHSP Ep 136: Teaching Teens to Cope with Stress, Interview with Marianna Chambers.

HSHSP Ep 136: Teaching Teens to Cope with Stress, Interview with Marianna Chambers Adolescent years are good times to learn to manage stress and anxiety.

HSHSP Ep 136: Teaching Teens to Cope with Stress, Interview with Marianna Chambers

One things teens know about is stress. For that matter, we moms know about stress, too! Marianna Chambers joins Vicki for a discussion about helping teens (and ourselves) deal with stress.

Marianna, like Vicki, is a counselor by profession and a homeschool mom. One of her passions is helping people manage anxiety and stress. Marianna is also a fellow podcaster here on Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network. Her podcast is the Peaceful Mom Talk. You’ll love this episode of her podcast: 4 Reasons We Struggle to Parent Peacefully.

To get you started, here’s a fun HSHSP episode on managing your own stress.

One of the most important ways to help teens cope with stress is helping them take control of their sleep.

Here are some tips:

Set a timer.

Set a timer for 10 minutes and spend that 10 minutes really thinking hard about all the things you’re stressed about. Believe it or not, when we give ourselves permission to think it through for a limited time, stress actually becomes easier to control. GREAT thing to do before bedtime (not when you are in bed).

Get thoughts down on paper.

Our brains do so much better if we do a *brain dump*: get all those thoughts on paper (or note pad on your phone). Don’t make it a proper essay (no one is grading this)! Make a bullet list, make a scribbled mess, whatever…just get everything out on paper.

Make your to-do list for tomorrow before you get ready for bed.

Make your plans and figure your tomorrow’s schedule out before you get ready for bed.

Talk it out with a friend.

If your friend was upset about something, would you want her to talk to you? Of course! Well, the same applies to you, right? That’s what friends are for, and it helps! (If your teen doesn’t have a friend like that, it is a good idea to pray about God’s wisdom on finding good friends.)

Talk to a counselor.

Talking to a counselor or youth pastor is a great idea. It really helps!

Shift your thinking to something else.

After you do the exercises above, shift your attention to something else. Here are some ideas:

  • Do a word puzzle.
  • Make a list of people to help.
  • Practice a mindful activity. (Here’s an excellent post from Vicki’s coaching site with mindful ideas for people who aren’t naturally mindful.)

Put your thoughts in a box.

It sounds goofy but it works, try it. Using your imagination, think about a beautiful box, think about what it would look like. Then tell your brain that you are now putting your thoughts in a box. Tell your brain you can get the thoughts back out later but for now they will stay in the box. This is something that, although it is unusual really helps!

Join Vicki and Marianna for a discussion on dealing with stress. Also, look for more from Marianna Chambers at FindYourMomTribe FB page and FindYourMomTribe.com.

You’ll also enjoy these posts:

3 Ways to Reduce Test Anxiety and 5 Tools for Success

What Does a Teen Need Most from Homeschool High School?

Homeschooling Teens with Mental Illness

HSHSP Ep 136: Teaching Teens to Cope with Stress, Interview with Marianna Chambers

HSHSP Ep 135: Heavy Equipment and Mothering

This week on HSHSP Ep 135: Heavy Equipment and Mothering.

HSHSP Ep 135: Heavy Equipment and Mothering Helicopter moms, Snowplow moms, Bulldozer moms. Here's how to avoid becoming a heavy equipment mom!

HSHSP Ep 135: Heavy Equipment and Mothering

Helicopter moms, snowplow moms… it is SOOOOO tempting to turn into a heavy equipment mother. Is it good for your homeschool high schoolers to have a mom who swoops and saves, clears out all the paths or smothers her teens?

While we’d love to say *YES*! We all know that it just ain’t so. Homeschooling high school means we are preparing to let our teens go into adulthood… in God’s hands, not ours!

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym as they wrestle through the tough issues of heavy equipment mothering.

We moms worry that we aren’t doing good enough jobs with our mothering! In fact, as Vicki says: Motherhood is all about guilt!

We want our kids to do well and be equipped for success in life! When they are young, we train our kids about behavior and consequences. So we apply the same concept to parenting. If we are perfect moms our teens will grow up to be perfect. Right? Right?

In God’s universe, things don’t work out that way. HE’S in charge of the outcome. Not us.

So we moms, when we are trying to be perfect and make life perfect for our kids, we are in danger of trying to be God ourselves. We want our behavior as moms to guarantee perfect outcomes (OUR version of perfect).

Snowplow moms:

Snowplow moms that swoop everything hard out of the path of their kids. However, when we clear the path in front of our kids so they have NO bumps or hardships, we actually debilitate them. They do not develop skills for problem solving and stamina!

We need to seek Godly wisdom on what to clear out and what when to step back out of the way. We are responsible for being aware of what our kids are ready to handle. The only way to know when to clear the way is to know our teens and know God’s voice.

Helicopter moms:

Helicopter moms are the moms who hover, giving kids answers to academics or life, tell sports coaches how to coach, or forgets that their teen’s friends are their teen’s friends. They are living their kids lives instead of allowing their kids to live their lives.

We need to be involved in our homeschool high schoolers’ lives. We need to primarily be listeners and questioning guides. We want to pull answers and good thinking OUT of teens. Not hover and do it for them.

Bulldozer moms:

Bulldozer moms push and push and push to the point that teens are frustrated and exhausted. These are moms who envision the very best life for their homeschool high schoolers so drive their kids into it, creating teens who are anxious and sad or are bulldozers themselves. Remember, teens need SOFT skills, not bulldozing skills. Remember grace and rest.

We are not responsible with outcomes! Keep your hope in God, not your own hard work!

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for a powerful and gracious discussion about heavy equipment and mothering. Also enjoy this encouraging episode of the Homeschool Sanity Podcast about how to powerfully pray for your family. Also this episode on the good news about *mom-fails*. 

A Homeschool Mom’s 1 Corinthians 13

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HSHSP Ep 135: Heavy Equipment and Mothering

HSHSP Ep 134: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

This week on HSHSP Ep 134: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters.

HSHSP Ep 134: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters Here's how to ask and receive a great recommendation!

HSHSP Ep 134: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

Even if you don’t have a college-bound teen OR your teen isn’t a senior yet, listen in on this episode. Vicki shares from experience from a couple of decades of writing hundreds of college-recommendation letters (and other favors for folks).

Step 1: Ask.

Don’t command: I need you to do something. Instead: Could you do me a favor? OR Could I impose on you for a favor? Then add: Please.

Step 2: Make it easy for the recommender to write the letter.

Give them a write-up of your accomplishments or special memories you have together that will make a good recommendation story. (Great recommendation stories are based on narratives, not just statements like: Sally is a great student.

Step 3: Provide the resources for sending that information.

If the recommendation is supposed to be a mailed letter, give a self-address, stamped envelope to the recommender. If it is an online recommendation, make sure they have any digital information they need such as what institution will send emails requesting information; whether they are a *recommender*, *teacher*, *advisor*, etc).

Step 4: Don’t be a cranky nag.

If the person is running late, ask if there’s anything you need to do to help.

Step 5: After the favor is done, say thank you.

You never know if you’ll ever need another favor, so leave a feeling of gratitude…don’t burn bridges. Remember, you may need a second favor. If you have been pushy or rude, your recommender may not be happy about helping out again.

Step 6: Return the favor.

This is not the same as buying a favor. It is a way to show appreciation. For instance: Make the *thank you* a written thank you note. Snail mailed. It is a powerful way to show appreciation.

If you had asked a big favor bring some cookies or some other show of appreciation.

Other notes:

  • Be sure to ask for the favor with plenty of time.
  • Be sure to ask in private (not in front of a bunch of people).

Join Vicki for a quick discussion on asking for college recommendation letters. You’ll enjoy this episode with more information on preparing for college. Also, enjoy these posts!

How to Request a College Recommendation Letter

12 Steps to Choosing a College Major

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HSHSP Ep 134: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

HSHSP Ep 133: How to Handle it When the Curriculum is Wrong for Your Teens

This week on HSHSP Ep 133: How to Handle it When the Curriculum is Wrong for Your Teens.

 HSHSP Ep 133: How to Handle it When the Curriculum is Wrong for Your Teens We are discussing what to do when curriculum is a bad fit for your teens.

HSHSP Ep 133: How to Handle it When the Curriculum is Wrong for Your Teens

Sabrina, Vicki and Kym tackle the uncomfortable topic: What to do when you bought the WRONG curriculum for your teens?

What if you invested in a curriculum that YOU hate? or your homeschool high schoolers hate?

There are a few options, and they are good. Here’s how to handle it when the curriculum is wrong for your teens.

  • Remember: There’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school?
  • Remember: It’s okay to have options, so forsake your perfectionistic ideas about curriculum and your choices.
  • Remember: Some curriculum providers have a money-back guarantee (7SistersHomeschool.com, for one)
  • Remember: Are you having a curriculum issue or an attitude issue. (Teens have to learn that they CAN do things they don’t want to do…moms, too! Sometimes teens have never truly hit this issue before. They had never truly hated a school subject before, but high school has required credits, even if teens DON’T like those credits.)
  • Remember: Ask yourself, is this ONE subject that your teen doesn’t like or is it ALL subjects? If it is all subjects, it may be other issues besides the specific curriculum? Ask yourself: Is this character, anxiety, health, self-care, wrong publisher?
  • Remember: Model flexibility, adaptability, willingness to change, humility for your teens.

Remember: Ask yourself if you have the wrong curriculum, for instance: a college-prep text for a non-college-bound teen? Why waste time, energy and self-image on unnecessary rigor in a textbook. That’s why 7Sisters curriculum is easily adaptable for college bound teens’ needs AND non-college-bound teens’ needs.

Here are concrete ideas:

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for a lively discussion and enjoy these posts, too!

Electives for Homeschool Transcript: History Electives

 

50 Ways to Scrap Your Schoolbook

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HSHSP Ep 133: How to Handle it When the Curriculum is Wrong for Your Teens

HSHSP Ep 132: Homeschooler’s Tips for College, Interview with Carly Smythe

This week on HSHSP Ep 132: Homeschooler’s Tips for College, Interview with Carly Smythe.

HSHSP Ep 132: Homeschooler's Tips for College, Interview with Carly Smythe #HomeschoolToCollege #HomeschoolAthletesInCollege

HSHSP Ep 132: Homeschooler’s Tips for College, Interview with Carly Smythe

We have a treat for this episode! Kym interviews her youngest twin, Carly, about success in college.

Carly is a homeschool graduate and is now a senior Sports Management major at University of Delaware. She is captain of UD’s Women’s Hockey, as well as part time work at UDairy, internships with sports camps at UD.

Carly Smythe photo used by permission HSHSP Ep 132: College Success Tips for Athletes

Carly Smythe photo used by permission

Carly got into ice hockey with her twin, Kendall, when the girls were 11 years old. The girls played travel league ice hockey all the way through high school. They both loved the sports so much that they looked for colleges with women’s ice hockey.

It was a big decision about playing at college level, Carly had to decide whether she had concern about burning out her love of the sport at that level. She evaluated colleges by the personality of the program. But most importantly she chose a college that had everything she wanted there. She was able to balance sports, service, academics and social life (even if she hasn’t slept all that much).

  • Carly had learned a lot about balancing academics, social and sports in homeschool high school. She was part of a homeschool umbrella school where she learned time management and what she likes to call: Self-accountability.
  • One of the most important things she learned in homeschool high school was how to use a syllabus.
  • Another thing she learned was how to translate study and projects on the syllabus into study time on her calendar.
  • She also learned how to make sure studying fits with practices, games, travel and work- that using good planning is necessary
  • Carly points out that studying with her teammates is important (especially while traveling)

An important tip that Carly offers is that finding stress management tools is necessary for success.

  • She depends on her sport or other fitness activities as stress burn-off.
  • Petting the family Seeing Eye dog helps, too. (Mom lives nearby, so she can drop the dog off periodically for Carly.)

She also recommends sleep (at least enough to survive). Self-awareness helps her know when her cutoff point on staying awake to study.

Carly suggests finding both serving and leadership positions in her college activities. She supervises at UDairy and is now a team captain and president of her UD Women’s Hockey team. She learned serving and culture/atmosphere creation in her homeschool umbrella school and has carried this through college.

Part of the culture creation she has loved is the power of creating fun in whatever project or program where she is involved

Carly is studying Sports Management and is hoping to stay in a career where she is busy and active.

Enjoy this episode with Kym and Carly. You’ll also enjoy this episode about what colleges are looking for in incoming freshmen.

You’ll also enjoy these posts:

The Secret to REAL Time Management

Homeschool Highschool Podcast #41: Time Audits for Teens

Helping Teens Become Independent Learners: Using a Syllabus

 


Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor – Change is in the Air Movie

This story embraces the imperfections that make us human, offers a way to set ourselves free and asks us all to take a good, long look at the wild birds in the sky.

Watch the trailer here!


 

HSHSP Ep 132: Homeschooler’s Tips for College, Interview with Carly Smythe