How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters- Special Replay.

How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

7Sisters’ Vicki spent eighteen years as an academic advisor to the local homeschool juniors and seniors. Over time, she wrote many, many college recommendation letters for her college-bound seniors. She also has talked with advisors and teachers who have written these important letters.

SO, even if you do not have a homeschooler senior who is headed for college OR your teen is not a senior yet, listen in on this episode. They will be facing the college application process eventually. Vicki shares from her experience and the experiences of her friends over a couple of decades of writing hundreds of college-recommendation letters (and other favors for folks).

Step 1: Ask.

Do not command: “I need you to do something.”

Vicki and her teacher/advisor friends have had many experiences with teens politely asking for recommendation letters. They have also had experiences where teens literally say, “I need you to write me a college recommendation”. SOOOO:

Instead ask: “Could you do me a favor?” OR “Could I impose on you for a favor?” Then add: “Please”.

A polite request will usually earn a letter that is happily written with lots of good detail. A command will get the minimal effort required for the task- just sayin’.

Step 2: Make it easy for the recommender to write the letter.

Give the recommender a write-up of your accomplishments or special memories you have together that will make a good recommendation story. Great recommendation stories are based on narratives, not just statements like: Sally is a great student.

A good list of accomplishments or a paragraph about special memories together will help the recommender write a great story about you. This will give the recommendation letter sparkle. (Also, the write-up will help jog their memories- sometimes it’s hard to remember everything when one is put on the spot.)

Step 3: Provide the resources for sending that information.

If the recommendation is supposed to be a mailed letter, give a self-address, stamped envelope to the recommender. If it is an online recommendation, make sure they have any digital information they need such as:

  • what institution will send emails requesting information
  • whether they are will be considered a recommender, teacher or advisor

Most colleges these days want digital recommendation letters. It helps if you clearly explain which format their recommendation letter will need to be.

Step 4: Do not be a cranky nag.

If the person is running late, ask if there is anything you need to do to help. However, do NOT nag. That just makes things worse. If you need to get a backup recommender, do that. However, most recommenders get the job done quickly.

Step 5: After the favor is done, say “thank you”.

You never know if you will ever need another favor, so leave a feeling of gratitude…do not burn bridges. Remember, you may need a second favor. If you have been pushy or rude, your recommender may not be happy about helping out again.

Besides, showing gratitude is always the right thing to do.

Step 6: Return the favor.

This is not the same as buying a favor. It is a way to show appreciation. For instance: Make the “thank you” a written thank you note. Snail mailed. It is a powerful way to show appreciation.

If you had asked a big favor (such as making your request at the last minute) bring some cookies or some other show of appreciation.

Other notes:

  • Be sure to ask for the favor with plenty of time.
  • Be sure to ask in private (not in front of a bunch of people).

Join Vicki for a quick discussion on asking for college recommendation letters. You’ll enjoy this episode with more information on preparing for college. Also, enjoy this post!

12 Steps to Choosing a College Major

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

How to Ask for College Recommendation Letters

Career Exploration: What’s Included?- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Career Exploration: What’s Included?- Special Replay.

Career Exploration: What's Included?- Special Replay

What’s Included in Career Exploration?

One of our favorite courses in homeschooling high school is Career Exploration. It is genuinely a valuable life preparation course. Join Vicki and Kym as they share their experiences and what’s included in Career Exploration.

There are all sorts of teens when it comes to career and Career Exploration

There’s not one right way to be a teen or to be ready for future careers.

  • You know, some kids are born knowing that they want to do when they grow up.

    • Take for instance, Vicki’s daughter, who wanted to be a photographer from the time she was a child.
  • Some kids figure it out while they are in their young teens.

    • An example of this is Kym’s husband, who as an adolescent liked to shoot pool at his buddy’s house. However, in order to shoot pool, they had to move the dad’s accounting paperwork off the table. Doug was fascinated by that paperwork and from that time, he wanted to be an accountant.
  • On the other hand, some teens love everything!

    • It’s SOOOO hard to choose just one career! (Kym’s daughters had a list of about twenty chosen careers during their high school years.)
  • Some careers happen serendipitously.

    • For example, Vicki’s oldest son earned his bachelor’s degree in Computer Science. During his last semester, his professors had a talk with him and told him that he should go to graduate school for Philosophy. He now has his PhD in Philosophy and teaches for Stanford University’s online philosophy-based high school.
    • BTW- Dr. Tillman authored 7Sisters’ Philosophy in Four Questions and co-authored 7Sisters’ History and Philosophy of the Western World.
  • Some teens think that they will go into one career…until they try an apprenticeship.

    • Once they got into the nitty-gritty of the job, they found there were aspects of that career that turned them off. These teens choose different careers but sometimes kept the original interest as hobbies or avocations. For instance, Kym’s son loves music. During high school he taught children’s music classes for a private school. He loved music but he did not like teaching children. So he did not choose music as a college major.
  • Other teens do not have a clue about what they want to be until after several semesters of college or a couple of years in the workforce.

    • Teens don’t need to know everything about the future when they graduate homeschool high school- but they will be off to a MUCH better start if they have a sense of direction!

Career Exploration is a necessary life preparation course in high school!

It may not be mandatory, but it certainly is important!  That’s because most people will need to have some sort of income during their adulthood. Whether teens go into a job or trade, military or college after high school graduation, it is wiser to have some preparation and choice-making out of the way.

What’s included in Career Exploration?

There’s not ONE right way to handle Career Exploration. We are sharing the 7Sisters’ version of Career Exploration curriculum. We developed the curriculum many years ago when Vicki’s oldest and his homeschool friends were in high school. They were all wondering about what to do next with their lives.

In order to address the teens’ needs, Vicki used her training as a counselor and career coach to develop a comprehensive but simple curriculum This is what it includes:

A look at role models who have influenced your teen in positive ways:

  • What were their careers?
  • What did they like or dislike about their jobs?

For religious teens: a talk about the will of God

  • How to look at how God looks at career and career choices.

Defining or discovering interests

  • Many teens have lots of interests.
  • Others haven’t had time to explore things that might interest them.
  • Help them look into interests: discover or develop them.

Respecting and defining skills, gifts or talents

  • All teens are gifted, skilled or talented in some kind of way. It is important to explore and develop these.

Understanding their “career values”

Career values are the values (lifestyle factors) that are meaningful to each person. These values include things like:

  • Work/life balance
  • Income needs
  • Work setting comfort

Apprenticeships or internships

In many cases, these apprenticeships or internships open doors (or convince teens to choose a different career).

These things are what Career Exploration is all about!

Join Vicki and Kym as they share about their work with homeschool high schoolers on the Career Exploration journey.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

Homeschooled and Headed for College- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Homeschooled and Headed for College- Special Replay.

Homeschooled and Headed for College

Homeschooled and Headed for College

Our 7Sisters’ own homeschoolers have all graduated. While most of them went to college, others headed for the workforce. That’s cool! But today we want to talk about our college-bound homeschool high schoolers!

Many homeschool high schoolers are planning to attend college. How about yours? We know there’s not one right way to homeschool high school AND there’s not one right way to do life after high school. Some teens are call right into the workforce, military or missions. Others must go through college.

For teens who are homeschooled and planning for college, we’ve got some helpful information to think about.

Remember, these are tips. You know what is best for your homeschool high schoolers.

As experienced homeschool moms and community leaders, we’ve learned some insider tips. What experience do we have?

  • We have graduated all of our homeschool high schoolers and all the college-interested teens attended a college of their choice.
  • Vicki has served as academic advisor for local homeschool upperclassmen, helping hundreds graduate and gain acceptance at a college of their choice.
  • Sabrina and Kym have, for decades, taught homeschool co-op and group classes and mentored college-bound students (including writing many, many college reference letters).
  • However, we can’t say that Quella the seeing eye puppy (who helped us record this episode) has helped many teens get into college yet. Maybe someday…

From our feet-on-the-ground experience, we have got helpful information for you regarding the questions we often receive:

First, you need to know that you and your teens can do this! Now, here are the questions.

Join Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Quella the seeing eye puppy for a lively and helpful discussion about college preparation and application!

Also, check out this resource for helping keep calm and homeschool on:

Mindfulness Activity: Progressive Relaxation VickiTillmanCoaching.com

Click here to download freebie how-to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

Special Thanks to our Network Sponsor!

 

Visit TheStarMovie.com to learn more.


How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum-Special Replay.

How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum

How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum

We 7Sisters have graduated twenty-plus of our own from homeschooling high school. In our own grads we now have:

  • College graduates in various fields (and various degrees)
  • Teachers and college professors
  • Tradesmen
  • Artists and actors
  • Real estate agents
  • Equine professionals
  • Police officers
  • Lawyers
  • Personal trainers
  • Homemakers

As you can see, we 7Sisters we had lots of high schoolers with different levels of interest and needs. We found that we could make the most of homeschooling high school by using different levels of academic rigor for teens different needs and abilities.

You have probably noticed that there is a LOT of difference in homeschool high schoolers. They have different:

  • Interests
  • Abilities
  • Goals

Teens have different goals.

  • Teens who are headed to competitive colleges or state universities, need competitive transcripts.
  • Others who are headed to community colleges or smaller, less competitive colleges need solid transcripts.
  • Teens who are headed into the non-college careers who need life and career preparation more than competitive core classes.
  • Others who needed remedial work needed to concentrate on that.

We also know that our teens have different interests

Homeschooling allows us to place emphasis on the areas they want to explore by increasing the “levels of rigor” of their interest courses. You cannot make every course the highest level (Level 5) in every interest area, but you can choose some. So, how do you know what level of rigor for your high schoolers’ courses? Talk to your teen!

Levels and the homeschool transcript

You can tailor the homeschool transcript to meet each individual needs by teaching courses at the level of your teen’s needs. If your teen is working on average high school level and is not headed for college, you often can skip adding levels of rigor to their course listings on their transcripts.

On the other hand, for teens heading to college, your high schooler will probably benefit by including the level of rigor for each course right in each course’s title. Here are two posts that go in-depth for working with levels on the transcript:

How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum

7Sisters Literature Guides include instructions for enjoying our popular Literature Guides at:

  • Level 1 (Remedial)
  • Level 2 (Average)
  • Level 3 (College Prep)
  • Level 4 (Advanced)
  • Level 5 (Honors)

Each guide covers only one or two literature themes so we don’t kill the book. There is also vocabulary, a little background information, comprehension and inferential questions.

  • Use higher levels for college bound teens who are English, Communications, History, Humanities majors
  • Or use Level 2 for a workforce-bound teen, adapt by using questions as discussion rather than writing (see each Literature Guide for more Level 2 information)
  • Level 1 (Remedial) is for teens with learning difficulties (adapting by choosing which questions and vocabulary are useful to them; also use adaptive technology for listening and writing)

7Sisters Elective Courses:

  • Introduction to Psychology from a Christian Perspective.
    • The text includes a grid that tells you how to handle each level. It is written at Level 2, so it is fun and comfortable to read for most homeschool high schoolers. Each chapter includes extra activities and exercises that will enrich the course and help level-up the course (or come up with your own). The higher the Level the student desires, the more meaningful activities the student will complete.
  • Human Development from a Christian Worldview. 
    • The text includes a grid that tells you how to handle each level. It is written at Level 2, so it is fun and comfortable to read for most homeschool high schoolers. Each chapter includes extra activities and exercises that will enrich the course and help level-up the course (or come up with your own). The higher the Level the student desires, the more meaningful activities the student will complete.

Check out Cathy Duffy’s Review of American Literature. It is in-depth and helpful.

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for more about using levels with 7Sisters curriculum.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor – Well Planned Gal

Rebecca from the Well Planned Gal understands the challenges of working within a budget, managing multiple children, and trying to keep up with a variety of information. That is why she created popular planner bundles!

Combine organizational tools with year long encouragement by bundling Well Planned Day planners with the popular Family Magazine. For a limited time, Save 30% with one of her popular planner bundles. Each bundle contains 2 planner products with a one-year subscription to Family Magazine.

Click Here to Go to Well Planned Gal


How to Use Levels with7Sisters Curriculum

Homeschooling in Imperfect Circumstances-Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Homeschooling in Imperfect Circumstances- Special Replay

Homeschooling in Imperfect Circumstances

Homeschooling in Imperfect Circumstances

Have you noticed that real life does not actually look like:

  • The Pinterest-perfect pictures on your well-curated Pinterest boards?
  • Or the Instagram filtered and perfectly staged IG posts?
  • Even the Facebook fabulous, perfect family photos?

If you are like most of us (well, ALL of us 7Sisters), then your family looks like a real family living in real life, real circumstances. SO let Sabrina and Vicki offer you a little homeschool real-life encouragement for you.

We are all homeschooling in imperfect circumstances most of the time

Recently, Sabrina had a conversation with a person who has been working through some challenging circumstances. Through this unasked-for time of growth, he has learned to frame the way he is handling life by saying:

Circumstances being what they are and me being who I want to be, I have decided to…

Notice what he has discovered: We know in imperfect circumstances, we humans can tend to think this way:

Circumstances being what they are and me being who I am…

See the difference? If we focus on who we are right now, we can become focused on our limitations. On the other hand, if we focus on who we want to become, we open the door to possibilities and even more availability to God working in and through us!

(However, remember to keep things balanced. God made us in special ways and each person it unique. When we remember and build on our God-given gifts and personalities, we are available to making good things happen.)

While we are working on balance, then, think about who you are and who you want to be at the same time. With that in mind, hold onto God’s grace and allow him to help you grow.

Circumstances being what they are and me being who I want to be, I have decided to...

With that said, let’s talk about homeschooling in imperfect situations

Most of us are homeschooling in less than perfect situations. That is just life! Here is some encouragement for some challenging situations.

Homeschooling in financially challenging situations

Have you noticed how much FABULOUS curriculum is out there. Oh man! If we could only buy a fraction of the cool texts, courses or programs that are available to our homeschoolers, our kids would have an amazing education!

However, money is often tight. In challenging financial times, we can say:

Financial circumstances being what they are. And me being the flexible and create person I want to be, we will be creative with what we can afford and trust God for good education.

Vicki recalled when she was homeschooling her kids in the early days of homeschooling. In those days, there was not much variety in the homeschool curriculum market. Not only that, but the curriculum that was available was expensive. Unfortunately, the marketing for those curricula was guilt and fear oriented: IF you do not use our curriculum, you are not homeschooling correctly!

In those early days, there was so much pressure to homeschool “right” because there were truly “truant officers at the door” occasionally. However, Vicki’s family had five homeschoolers and a very limited budget but she knew (especially for homeschooling high school) that she wanted to do a good job! (More on choosing curriculum here.)

She was never able to afford the “right” curriculum. So she had to say:

Circumstances being what they are. And me being the good homeschooling parent I want to become, I will trust that God has our family where he wants us. Not only that but it is “right” for me to create our own curriculum that fits our kids’ needs (and not be whiny and complain-y person while I was at it).

Vicki’s homeschool mom-friends were in the same boat at the time. They were thinking the same thoughts. Together, they began creating curriculum for their kids and co-ops. Because their kids are all encouraged to have well-thought-out opinions, they gave feedback on the curriculum. Thus, it was refined until they ended up with the materials that became 7SistersHomeschool.com‘s  curriculum offerings.

SO, good can come out of financially challenging circumstances!

The homeschool mom who does not feel competent to homeschool

What if you are a mom who wants or needs to homeschool but you do not feel competent because:

  • You did not go to college
  • Or you are not a natural writer
  • Maybe you hate math
  • Or you do not know everything already
  • Maybe you are a busy, working mom

Here is a suggestion, think about saying to yourself:

Circumstances being what they are, and me being who I want to be, I can learn to work creatively and model a growth mindset for my kids. I can farm things out and develop resources for my homeschoolers.

Sabrina shares about her own experiences homeschooling her family. She felt concerned about whether she was competent to homeschool her kids because she only had a year and a half of college. Not only that, but she severely struggled in her college math class.

Her math struggles haunted her as she began to homeschool her kids.

She tried several math curriculums with her kids, but realized that she was passing on her math anxiety to her homeschoolers. Then she said to herself:

Circumstances being what they are, and me being who I want to be (a wise and calm mother who is creative with her resources), I will find a different solution to the math problem!

Then she realized that she could swap resources in her local homeschool co-op and umbrella school. Sabrina is a wonderful literature teacher. She swapped teaching literature to the homeschool high schoolers, while another mom taught her kids math! It was perfect!

So remember, life is full of imperfect homeschooling circumstances

In any circumstance, you can choose to become the person that God created you to become. He is working in and through you, to make you a model of creativity. trust and growth mindset for your kids. So keep saying:

Circumstances being what they are and me being who I want to be, I have decided to…

These are just a couple of examples, but remember, that God is a God of redemption. He likes making new things out of brokenness.

So in the brokenness of your imperfect circumstances, you can trust God to help you become the homeschooling mom he wants you to be. Share your stories and questions with us here or on our 7SistersHomeschool Facebook group, please!

Join Sabrina and Vicki for encouragement about homeschooling in imperfect circumstances. You CAN do it!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our Apple Podcasts page.
  2. OR take this IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in “…your favorite podcast source”
  3. This will take you to Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast source and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

OR PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review*

Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers- Special Replay

Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers

Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers

How do you go about preparing homeschool high schoolers for managing money throughout their lives? Financial Literacy is a life skills math credit that many teens will use WAY more often than their high school math. Join Sabrina, Vicki, Kym and Eagle, the Seeing Eye puppy for a fun discussion of Financial Literacy curriculum.

Lots of us homeschooling parents did not have Financial Literacy courses in their high school days. Remember back then? The emphasis was taking lots of rigorous academic maths and sciences so that we would look competitive to colleges. Consumer Math or Financial Literacy was looked down on- a waste of credit-earning time. Often, those practical courses were reserved for non-college bound peers.

Then came 2008, when the economy crashed! Some economists believed that poor personal financial management (including too much mortgage debt) was part of the problem. Education officials realized that many teens graduated from high school with no financial training. In reaction to this, many state education departments began to require that high school transcripts include Consumer Math so that teens could be ready with at least basic life-preparation, money-management skills.

But Consumer Math might not be enough for many teens. If they want real-life preparation for not just money, but for:

  • making financial decisions that will work for them, not against them
  • wisely planning for the future
  • other financial considerations

Teens need more than Consumer Math for a financially successful future. They need Financial Literacy!

A penny saved is a penny earned is just the beginning. Give your teens financial skills for a lifetime.

So, what is the difference between Consumer Math and Financial Literacy?

  • Consumer Math covers the basics such as creating a budget and balancing a checkbook.
  • Financial Literacy covers Consumer Math PLUS planning for the future, finding the right insurances, banking, credit and more.

Where do you find Financial Literacy courses

There are several good financial training courses. We, of course, like 7Sisters’ Financial Literacy because it covers all the bases of Financial Literacy courses but also trains students on how to find information (and where to avoid information). It is a fun, interactive, internet-based, practical curriculum that teens love…and actually use. Homeschool high schoolers finish the course with a life financial plan.

As soon as 7Sisters’ published our Financial Literacy course, our teens began using it and teaching it in our local homeschool co-op and group classes. The curriculum was vetted by the teens, who gave valuable feedback on how they learn best. Many teens are now adults and still using the skills they learned from their Financial Literacy course.

Vicki shares that her youngest was one of the first students to use this curriculum. He started budgeting and planning for the future in eleventh grade and is now grown with a solid job, marriage, home and reasonable lifestyle. This is because he started learning and applying Financial Literacy skills in his youth.

You can also find online Financial Literacy courses that are presented by schools such as:

Is Financial Literacy a Math credit or an Elective credit?

That’s a good question. Financial Literacy can be either a Math or Elective credit, according to your teens’ goals. For non-college-bound teens, or for teens who are not aiming for a competitive college, they can usually use Financial Literacy as a Math credit (after all, it employs a LOT of math, right?). For teens aiming for a more competitive college, it is a good idea to count Financial Literacy as a Life-Skills Elective.

Want some fun when your homeschool high schoolers are learning Financial Literacy?

Check out these posts with lots of cool, practical ideas for learning about money.

Start off with sharing few blog posts that explain the benefit of learning Financial Literacy.

Then, you can add some fun to your Financial Literacy course with games. Here are some favorite Consumer Math games.

Your teens will benefit from taking Financial Literacy, but don’t take our word for it. Check out these posts from 7Sister Sara’s sons Luke and Joel. You’ll also enjoy this Dollars and Cents Podcast episode on How to Teach Kids about Managing Money.

Financial Literacy for Homeschool High Schoolers

Scheduling Your Homeschool High School Year Successfully- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool High School Podcast: Scheduling Your Homeschool High School Year Successfully- Special Replay!

Scheduling Your Homeschool High School Year Successfully- Special Replay

Scheduling Your Homeschool High School Year Successfully

We know that many homeschooling moms love scheduling…and many DON’T. Whether you enjoy scheduling, it is a good idea to employ some scheduling skills! High school needs organization and scheduling if you are going to achieve your goals (and your teen graduate in four years).

We often receive questions about the right way to plan and then create schedules for homeschool high schoolers! What is the one right way to schedule your homeschool high school year?

There’s NOT one right way to schedule but there are some tips for developing a schedule that works for you!

Based on what has worked for our 7Sisters families (along with our teens), here are some tips for successfully scheduling your homeschool high school year:

Start with the end in mind.

  • Write out your vision or mission statement (click here for a writing your mission statement guide). For our purposes right now, vision and mission are pretty similar.
    • A written vision or mission statement really does help you keep your homeschooling family on task.
      • It helps you choose curriculum (will it advance the vision or mission? or am I experiencing peer pressure to buy curriculum that just will not fit our needs?)
      • When you remember your vision or mission, you can best choose activities that fit the family’s needs. (These days there are SO many options for our homeschool high schoolers that we are often faced with having toooo many activities to choose from.)
      • It helps you imagine and create an idea of the kind of homeschool environment you want.
        • Do your want a quiet, serious, by-the-book homeschool or a rollicking, spontaneous homeschool (or a mix of both)?
        • When you feel stressed, a vision or mission statement can actually help you keep calm and homeschool on.
  • Next, set four year goals.
    • What do you want your teens to have accomplished by the time they graduated (on the transcript and in real life).
      • When they walk across the stage at graduation, what kind of person do you hope your teens will be?
      • What kinds of experiences  (academic or otherwise) do you want them to have had?
      • Life preparation- what do you want them to definitely know how to do?
    • Read this post on how to set goals.

Organize your homeschool year by scheduling backwards.

Schedule backward for your homeschool

Remember: stay flexible! As Vicki always says:

A mom’s mind plans her way, but God directs her steps.

When life happens or things go wrong, give yourself grace and breathing space! Then get back to the schedule as soon as possible OR choose the create a NEW schedule based on the family’s current needs. (For instance, if a chronic illness has developed, you will probably need a whole new schedule. Thats’s okay! Realistic goals and flexibility are key!)

Remember to include teens in the planning process, so that they can own their education.

  • Be sure to write your goals down.
  • Have an accountability partner.

If you need some support, you might enjoy some coaching from Vicki at VickiTillmanCoaching.com.

Join Sabrina and Vicki for this helpful discussion.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review*

Helping Teens Handle Discouragement

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Helping Teens Handle Discouragement.

Helping Teens Handle Discouragement

Helping Teens Handle Discouragement

Let’s face it, as humans, we all experience moments of discouragement. Our teens are no exception. Let’s explore some practical ways in helping teens handle discouragement as they navigate through these uncertain, kind of “weird”, challenging times.

Join Vicki for encouragement on helping teens to handle discouragement in healthy ways.

Tackling Difficult Academics

One common source of discouragement for teens is struggling with challenging academics. Whether it’s precalculus, algebra, or geometry, it’s easy for them to feel stuck and believe they’re not good enough. Even us adults, we would feel a little defeated in the face of those math monsters. 

And when they’re feeling down, motivation goes out the window, making it a real struggle to get anything done. We’ve all been there, right? 

As homeschooling parents, it’s essential to provide support during these moments. A few ways to show your support are:

  • Start by making eye contact and allowing them to express their frustrations. 
  • Let them vent and get those negative thoughts out of their system. 
  • Instead of correcting them, help them find their positives. 
  • Remind them of a time when they actually enjoyed something academic.
  • Let them know they can take a break from this tough stuff and recalibrate the next day. 

Help them remember that there is some light at the end of the academic tunnel, even if it means going back in time a little. Sometimes a day or two off is just what the doctor ordered. Our friend CJ over at Homeschooling Through High School swears by it. 

So, take a breather, go on a drive, or plan a fun field trip instead of banging their heads against those textbooks. Helping teens handle discouragement and failure is no easy task, but with a little creativity and ingenuity, it can be done. 

Take a break and recalibrate.

Finding Support

Sometimes teens are dealing with subjects that are just way out of our league as parents. You know which ones I’m talking about…science labs, super tough math, or anything that makes us scratch our heads in confusion. 

In those cases, it’s time to think outside the box. When you have to “teach what you don’t know” and you both are at risk of discouragement:

Thinking outside the box and finding alternative ways to tackle tough subjects can boost your teen’s confidence and motivation. The point is to find creative solutions to tackle those discouraging subjects head-on.

Adjusting Curriculum

Not every teen needs to follow the same academic path. If your teen is heading towards a trade school, the military, or pursuing a literature major in college, it may be worth reevaluating their curriculum. Here are 50 ways to “scrap your schoolbook” 🙂

Dropping unnecessary subjects, like precalculus, can alleviate unnecessary stress and provide opportunities to explore more relevant topics. Then choose some curriculum that might be a better fit. Financial literacy, for example, could be a valuable alternative. 

Remember, just because something is available to do doesn’t mean it’s the right fit for everyone. Scale back and let your teen focus on what truly matters for their future path.

Navigating Life’s Unexpected Twists

Sometimes discouragement for teens isn’t just about academics. Life has a funny way of throwing curveballs, and our teens can feel down when things don’t go as planned. They might think, By now, I should be doing this and that, or I really wanted to do this, but it’s not happening

It’s all part of the rollercoaster ride called Life. When “life happens”, help your teens focus on the good in the present and have hope for the future. Remind them that even though things may not be going as planned right now, they have enough to get by. 

They have food, clothes, and a support system that believes in them. And guess what? The future holds amazing things for them. 

Be their role models, showing them that we’re living in the present with hope in the future, believing that good things are on the horizon. It’s all about navigating the present and the future with faith and hopefulness. We can’t lecture our teens into feeling better, but we can guide them through it.

Coping with Changing Friendships

Now, let’s talk about friendships. Discouragement for teens can happen when they and their friends seem to be heading in different directions. Even us moms go through those friendship changes. It can be downright discouraging. 

When your teen comes to you, pouring their heart out about how they don’t understand what’s going on, let them process it. Let them express their frustrations and just be there for them. 

Of course, if there are negative behaviors on their part, like bossing everyone around or throwing temper tantrums, it’s an opportunity to teach them some valuable life skills. In these particular moments, simply help them work on their self-control and how they interact with others. 

But sometimes, friendships just naturally evolve, and that’s okay. Assure your teen that they are amazing individuals, and there are plenty of friends waiting for them in the future. Together, you’ll get through this rough patch. 

Remember, it’s all about the present and the future. This might feel weird and discouraging right now, but they still have friends, acquaintances, and activities that bring them joy. And in the future, they’ll build an incredible network of awesome people. Here’s a post on making friends in college that can help with high schoolers, too.

Recognizing Signs of Depression

Here’s a little something to keep in mind: sometimes discouragement for teens can escalate into more serious issues like depression or anxiety. It’s crucial to be vigilant and recognize the signs. 

Lethargy, disinterest, excessive crying, or isolation may indicate a depressive episode. Bouncing back becomes a real challenge, especially when they’re bombarded with one discouraging moment after another. 

If you notice these symptoms persisting, don’t hesitate to seek professional help. Reach out to your family doctor or find a counselor who specializes in working with teens. Remember, addressing mental health concerns is vital for their overall well-being.

We don’t want discouragement to take root and overshadow their lives. We want them to be healed, whole, and filled with hope. Feel confident in knowing there are resources out there to help them – and you – and it’s a beautiful thing to witness their journey towards freedom from those depressive episodes.

Creating Positive Experiences

When discouragement rears its ugly head, it’s time to create some positive events. When helping teens handle discouragement, as homeschooling parents, we can’t fix everything, but we can inject positivity into our teens’ lives. 

Take a break on the weekend and do something out of the ordinary with your teens. Plan spontaneous outings or activities that they won’t expect. Explore local state parks, museums, or nature trails. The change of scenery and the shared experiences can work wonders.

While they may initially resist, these experiences can lift their spirits and release healing and bonding hormones in their brains. When you engage in a new activity or go on a field trip, their brains release oxytocin, the healing and bonding hormone. Their brains get a little zap of positive vibes. 

Think outside the box, check out local newspapers or online resources for weekend activities, state parks, museums, nature trails, you name it. Just do something different. You might not be able to fix the world for your teens, and you can’t magically make those math lessons disappear, but you can inject a little positivity into their lives. And that is worth its weight in gold.

Helping Teens Handle Discouragement

Dealing with discouragement for teens is a challenge every homeschooling mom faces. By implementing these strategies, you can support your teens through difficult academic moments, navigate changing friendships, and help them find hope in uncertain times. 

Remember, you’re not alone in this journey. Join the 7Sisters Homeschool Facebook group to connect with a supportive community of homeschooling moms. Together, we can empower our teens and help them overcome discouragement.

Thank you to Richie Soares with Homeschool and Humor for writing this blog post and Seth Tillman for editing!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

What to do Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschoolers- Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast Senior What to do Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschoolers- Special Replay

What to do Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschoolers

What to do Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschoolers- Special Replay

You and your homeschool teens have been working diligently all through high school. They needed a college-attractive transcript. Not only that, they needed the college-prep study skills and safety skills that college students will use. However, they also needed to be teenagers and have some kind of fun and balanced life. You all have made it this far….to SENIOR YEAR!!

Congratulations!

Senior year is different from the earlier years of homeschooling high school. We are always getting LOTS of questions about what to expect from senior year for college bound homeschool high schoolers. What are the rhythms of senior year?

What needs to happen and when during senior year?

Of course, as we always say: There’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school, so you and your teens need to decide what is best. However, it is nice to have some guidelines that can help you set your own goals. These are the senior year goals we set for our college-bound teens.

June, July, August goals:

July goals:

  • Plan the academics for the year, include your teen in the process. It is SO important to have your teens’ buy-in for their final year of high school!
  • Order your curriculum if possible.

August goals:

  • Have your senior write their college application essays.
    • Most of the online applications have the essay topics posted by August (and sometimes they are the same essay topics as the previous year).
  • Check out this Homeschool Highschool Podcast episode on how to apply to college.
  • ALSO: Please, please, please: Discuss with your seniors how to politely ask for their college recommendation letter!
    • That letter may not be due yet, but when seniors have written that college application essay, they can imagine how much time it will take the person they have chosen to write that recommendation letter.

September goals:

  • Work with your senior to narrow the college choices down to three to five good-fit schools.
  • Make sure your teen has toured those schools.
  • If the school has rolling admissions, your teen can start the application process.
    • Otherwise, find out what the early application timeframe is. Discuss with your teen if they want early or regular admissions.

October goals:

  • If early admissions is open for your teens choice schools, you can probably apply now.
  • Have your seniors take their time and do a good job.
  • Get the reference requests done, if they have not already done so.

November goals:

  • See if your seniors can wrap up the college applications and recommendation letters.

Holiday goals:

  • Have a nice holiday season. Keep those academics on target.

January goals:

  • Keep an eye on status on the online essays….IF you are not obsessing about it. Remember, it is your teen who is headed to college, not you!
  • You really can trust God to open and close the right doors.
  • Please do not share everything cool that your teen with all your social media.
  • Ask you teens first! Remind your teen to be compassionate with their friends who are in different places in the process.

February goals:

  • Send mid-year grades to colleges.
  • Start working on graduation. (Some homeschool graduates do not want an official graduation, that is okay, too!)
  • Are senior pictures done?
  • Pick graduation date.
    • Start organizing your ideas for graduation party and ceremony.

March goals:

  • Financial aid packages have arrived.
    • Time for your teen to make that college decision.

April goals:

  • Plan the schedules to finish off academics and activities to finish in time.

May goals:

  • Wrap things up. All the things!

June goals:

  • Graduation!!! Congratulations!!

After graduation, many people celebrate with a graduation party!

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for an encouraging, empowering talk about senior year for college bound homeschool high schoolers. In the meantime, enjoy these posts and resources:

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*

What to do Senior Year for College-Bound Homeschoolers- Special Replay

Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers, Special Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers, Special Replay.

Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers, Special Replay

Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers

There’s not one right way to homeschool high school and there’s not one right way to prepare for life after graduation. After all, some homeschool high schoolers graduate and go to college. Some teens need a gap year (or two) before they go to college. They want to work or serve for a time before heading to college. At the same time, MANY  homeschooling high schoolers graduate and go right into the workforce!

It is NOT WRONG to not go to college! Not all young people are called to go to college.

There are lots of options for homeschool graduates. But FIRST they need to finish senior year. Senior year is such a wonderful opportunity to truly prepare your non-college-bound teens for life after graduation. Let’s talk about it! Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers.

Scheduling senior year for non-college-bound teens

Help your teen be ready for adulting:

  • Preparations for career
  • Practical life skills that will prepare them for a responsible adulthood

Summer before senior year

July: Plan out the academic year.

What is left of the academic requirements for graduation in your state and/or supervising organization?

Think about practical courses. Has your career-bound teen had courses like:

BTW- Make sure you include your teen in the process. This is especially important as you prepare for senior year. Teens need to be empowered to think and give opinions about what needs

  • to happen after graduation
  • still must be covered in academics in order to graduate
  • how best to fulfill all these

Also, include your teens in choosing curriculum. Lastly order textbooks, supplies and whatever you need for the school year.

August: Work on career readiness skills

There are several ways to approach building career readiness skills. Here are a few:

Fall semester of senior year

September through December: Career preparation for life after graduation.

Of course, you must finish off the academics for graduation between now and June. Try not to overdo the academics (unless there are topics where your teen has definite interest- then, in that case, have at it!)

Instead of killer academics, concentrate on skills that will help them in the job hunt, career preparation and life in general. Here are a few our non-college-bound teens have learned and appreciated.

Winter semester of senior year

January through May

Work on graduation plans like senior pictures, graduation date and location, announcements while things are more quiet. Schedule backwards through the end of the school year. What academics need to be completed or caught up? Schedule backwards to the end of the year.

Also, throughout the year, you may need to wrestle with these questions:

Teens do not always have a clear understanding about what life will be like after graduation. They may experience anxiety (here’s a post to help). Or they might have some totally unrealistic dreams.

How do you deal with students who are struggling or have some unrealistic dreams?

  • Help them discover Plan B’s and let them know how long you will support them as they try for professional gaming, sports or some other “big dream” career.

Join us this week for encouragement for career-bound seniors and their moms. For more thoughts on senior year for non-college-bound teens check this post.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our iTunes page.
  2. IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in iTunes
  3. This will take you to iTunes and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
  7. Thanks!

Also, enjoy these posts:

What are “Values” and Why are Values Important in Career Exploration?

Homeschool Graduate and Entrepreneur Talks about Success and Financial Literacy

HSHSP Ep 82: Writing Happens, Make it Useful- Professional Writing Skills

Scheduling Senior Year for Career-Bound Homeschoolers