GPA on Homeschool Transcript- How to Handle it!

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: GPA on Homeschool Transcript- How to Handle it!

GPA on Homeschool Transcript- How to Handle it!

 

Are you wondering about the complex and stressful GPA for your child’s homeschool transcript? Well, fear not! There are effective strategies and resources available to help you navigate the intricacies of calculating GPA on a homeschool transcript. With a little help, you can ensure that your homeschool high schoolers’ academic achievements are accurately reflected.

To help you along, here are a few insights about GPAs, along with practical tools you can use to figure them out!

There’s Not ONE Right Way To Handle GPAs

Even though some families are lucky enough to be in an umbrella school or a charter school that does the GPA figuring, even in those situations, moms may still want to use a different method of choosing the GPAs. That’s okay.

The thing is, there is no right way or wrong way to do GPAs. If your child is college-bound, you will most likely need to include GPA on the transcript. However, non-college bound teens do not necessarily need GPA (unless they are going to a trade school that requires it). 

Understanding GPAs

The GPA is a way of summarizing, academically, what your teen has done successfully (or not) in their homeschool journey thus far. It is like a second eyeball on how well your child is doing overall in his or her courses. You can quickly figure out an overall GPA at the end of each of their high school years- or wait until senior year.

We 7Sisters, at the end of each year, we calculate the GPA for that year. For example, at the end of freshman year, we will figure out that year’s GPA. Then we will update it each year. Therefore, at the end of sophomore year, it will be the GPA for freshmen and sophomore year, and so on.

One pro about handling the GPA in this way is that your teen gets to see how much progress they have made. This is especially nice if your teen (or mom) has a little bit of a rugged start to their freshman year. Seeing their GPA go up year after year gives many teens a sense of accomplishment.

On the other hand, you may simply wait for senior year. That is okay in many circumstances.

Sample homeschool transcript

Here’s an example of a homeschool transcript.

 

Decide How Often You Want To Calculate The GPA

You need to decide – and stick to – how often you calculate your homeschool high schooler’s GPA by choosing one of the examples above. 

BTW- Sometimes once your teens have applied to college, different colleges may want a mid-senior year GPA update. 

Decide To Have A Weighted Or Not Weighted GPA

The next thing you need to decide is whether or not to have a weighted GPA. Some courses in some schools are weighted, so if you have a teen taking an AP course one of those schools instead of getting an 4.0 for an A grade, they might get a 4.5. This means they get more weight on a higher-powered course.

However, you do not have to have weighted GPAs in the courses in order to have your teens standout on college applications. That is because colleges use special algorithms when evaluating submission applications of the students. Colleges will not compare apples to oranges – or unweighted courses of students against weighted courses of other students. Instead, colleges have a way using their algorithm to unweight the weighted courses in order to make fair comparisons.

If you do not want to have weighted GPAs, that’s perfectly okay. (We 7Sisters and our umbrella school did not weight grades- and we have helped hundreds of teens get into the colleges of their choice). So, for our homeschool high schoolers, an A was a 4. 0. 

Also, if you want your teens to receive an academic scholarship, deciding to weight or not weight courses will not affect their chances. It did not hurt our teens nor any of the ones that we have advised over the years. 

Ultimately, it is completely up to you whether you decide to have weighted GPAs or not.

Remember: There’s no standardized anything in transcripts or education. You just do the clearest and best job that you can, and trust God through the process.

The GPA is a way of summarizing your teen's academics.

Calculating the GPA: Decide What The Lowest Passing Grade Will Be

One of the things you will need to do in calculating the GPA is to decide what is the lowest passing grade that a course can have for transcript.

For our 7Sisters’ high schoolers, our lowest was underneath a C. (Sometimes, if our teens got this grade, we had our teens retake the course until they had mastery… because in homeschooling we are more after mastery than we are GPA.) 

In many traditional schools, a D is the lowest passing grade. Unfortunately, for teens aiming to go to a competitive college, a D on the transcript is not going to work very well for them. Even if they passed the course, it will not give them any kind of benefit in a competitive situation. Instead, it will work against them. 

NOTE: On transcripts, you should include is a key that’s on the transcript, a legend like on a map, that shows how grades are assigned. 

7Sisters Homeschool has an editable PDF transcript that you can download and use yourself and fill in the legend yourself. 

Calculating the GPAs: Determine What Percentage Will Be Assigned To Each Letter Grade

Now that we have discussed the theories and understanding of GPAs, let’s talk about actually figuring them out. For your courses, determine what percentages are going to be assigned to each letter, such as A, B, and C. 

For instance, we know that a 100 on a test would mean an A, and that is easy to figure out. But you will also want to know what the lowest A would be, because every school has a different determination on what the low end and high end of each grade letter is. 

In our case, with 7Sisters students:

  • The lowest A would be a 92 or a 93
  • The lowest B might be an 82 or an 83
  • The lowest. C might be a 72 or 73

It’s a very simple way to calculate the grades and the GPA if you just have A’s and B’s and C’s.

However, many traditional schools get very complex by having  A’s and A minuses and B’s pluses and B’s and B minuses and C pluses and C’s and C minuses. You can do this too, if you want to, because there’s not one right way.

For instance, you might say that:

  • the lowest A might be a 93 but
  • an A minus might be a 90 and
  • the B+ might be an 87, a
  • regular B might be an 83
  • and the lowest B be an 80,
  • and so on down through the letters.

Caution: Don’t do this randomly or change the way you do it halfway through the semester. Once you decide the way you’ll calculate the grades and GPA, be sure to stick with it to make things easier on yourself. Put that in your course description up front or in your syllabus so that you have something to back up in your records.

This way, when you have to fill out the guidance counselor part of the college application, you will know what your teen will be using for colleges, and you will be able to really quickly explain how you assign grades in your homeschool. (BTW- you can find tips for the Common Application, including the guidance counselor portion, in this post from our friend at BJ’s Homeschool.)

MORE Calculating the GPAs: Assign the Overall Percentage and Grade Points Of A Class

At the end of a semester and again at the end of the year, you will assign course grades. This might be an accumulation of tests, papers and course work (but we also included attitude as well- similar to class-participation grade).

Once you have the overall grade, you will take that average and assign it a grade point. For instance:

  • A = 4 (92 to 100)
  • B = 3 (82 or 92)
  • C = 2 (73 to 82) 

If you are doing the complex one, you can break that down further this way, for instance: 

  • A minus might be a 3.6
  • B plus might be a 3 4
  • B might be 3.2
  • B minus might be a 3.0. 

You can get as complex as you want as long as you keep how you are grading stated within your course descriptions or your syllabus so that you have a record for it. This grading system will also be included in the legend on your transcript. 

GPA and transcripts! You can do this!

Assign Grade Points To Courses

Once you have decided the grade points, decide which courses are going to get those grade points.

You do not have to give a grade point to every single course you could. In our case, we just gave a grade point to the core courses because that showed the guts of their academics and the things that they would mostly be facing in their first couple of years in college, the general education courses.

Core courses usually include:

  • English/Language Arts
  • Math,
  • Social Studies
  • Sciences
  • World Languages

These are courses that would receive a grade point because they are the core courses. The remainder of the courses are considered to be electives. We did not include these in the GAP. However, some families choose to give everything a grade point, including all the electives. Do what is best for your family.  

Get the Grade Point Average

Each core course, for us, gets an assigned grade point, and to keep up with this, you can create a spreadsheet. Add those grade points up, just old-fashioned math, and then divide it by the number of courses in order to get the grade point average.

For instance, if you had five courses such as language arts, math, social studies, science, and world language, you would add up all of the five grade points. Once you add those up, divide by five, and that would give you the average GPA, or grade point average. This grade point average is what goes on the transcript.

As mentioned, some of the transcript services automatically calculate the GPA based on the courses added. If you use a transcript service like this, you don’t have to do the math yourself. And if you want to add more courses in there, like electives, especially if those are really powerful for your teen and you really want to show those off, you can throw those in the GPA too. 

GPA on Homeschool Transcript

As you can see, there is no right way to do this!

Once you have all this together, what happens is then you have a nice GPA that goes on the transcript in the way that’s best for you and your teens. And when they go to apply for college, they have something that is understandable to the colleges they’re applying to. 

This accumulation of grades and averages inspires your teen also because they see how hard they have worked and a literal progression of that hard work. It ends up being a huge motivator!

If you want to access a GPA calculator, you can do that here.

More Resources for transcripts and GPAs

GPA and transcripts! You can do this!

Thank you to Richie Soares with Homeschool and Humor for writing this blog post!

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What to Include on Homeschool Transcripts

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: What to Include on Homeschool Transcripts.

What to Include on Homeschool Transcripts

What to Include on Homeschool Transcripts

The most common questions we receive about homeschooling high school are about transcripts. We understand. Transcripts are important! They are the key to getting into college and are proof that high school actually did happen! So Vicki decided to chat with all of you, our 7th Sisters, about what to include on the transcripts.

BTW- Before we even get started, we want to remind you that 7SistersHomeschool.com has an editable transcript template with a complete how-to guide in our estore for your instant download! There are also oodles of posts at 7Sisters, including the popular Authoritative Guide to Homeschool Transcripts. Check them out by searching “transcripts” in the search bar!

First thing, why should you give your teen a homeschool transcript?

We know that a number of states do not require homeschooling parents to issue a transcript. In those states you are totally allowed to say, “Hey, you’re done! Congratulations,” and then move on with the rest of life without a transcript.

However, if you can, we have heard a number of stories about grownups who needed a high school transcript:

  • Upon applying to college after being in the workforce for a few years
  • Upon entering graduate school, even though a local college had not required it for undergraduate studies
  • Upon applying for a significant career-change job

So, you can be gracious and kind to your homeschool high schoolers to keep a transcript throughout high school, then issue a completed transcript when they graduate. Years later, they may come back and thank you.

A wise woman keeps up with the transcript, starting in 9th grade!

Now, what do you include on homeschool transcripts?

You do not need to have a highly polished, professional-looking transcript, just get something. Here’s what to put on the transcript.

At the top of your transcript:

  • Your homeschool’s name, or simply the words “High School Transcript”.
  • Your student’s full name
  • Your student’s date of birth
  • Your address

Sections for each of the four years of high school:

  • Grade and year (9th grade, 10th grade, 11th grade, 12th grade) along with the actual school year for that grade (for example: 9/2020-6/2021)
  • Courses taken that year, starting with the core courses: English/Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, World Languages, Phys Ed, Fine Arts, all the Electives that year
    • Be sure to use the specific course title, (for example: One year for ELA your teen may take American Literature, so use “American Literature” for the course title)
  • Note that homeschoolers will often have more credits (particularly electives) than their traditionally-schooled peers. That is because we believe that all of life is education, so we include all valuable learning experiences.
  • How do you know if your teen has earned a credit? Check out posts on earning credits at 7SistersHomeschool.com.
  • Beside the title of the course, record the

Summary of courses (optional):

  • This is a grid that shows that the core courses were taken each year and the electives that were recorded each year

At the bottom of the transcript, list extracurriculars:

  • List the extracurricular activity (sport, community work, clubs, etc) along with the years involved
  • Some colleges want to see long-term engagements and community mindedness

At the bottom of transcript, list competitions:

At the bottom of the transcript, record GPA:

  • For instructions on determining GPA, check out this post.
  • Do you weight GPA’s? We don’t. We have found that colleges have formulas that make the weighting of applicants’ GPAs the same across the board.
  • Remember: You cannot use the name “AP” for a course unless it is a College Board approved course.

At the bottom of the transcript, record the date of graduation.

Join 7SistersHomeschool Facebook group for more homeschool high school support (also our friend Ann Karako has an amazing Facebook group).

Homeschool high school: You CAN do it! Homeschool high school transcript: YOU can do it!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

  1. Follow this link to our Apple Podcasts page.
  2. OR take this IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in “…your favorite podcast source”
  3. This will take you to Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast source and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review*

What to Include on Homeschool Transcripts

Dual Credit on the Road

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Dual credit at home is all the talk in Episode #153 of Roadschool Moms. The replay is a live recording by the Roadschool Moms team from the road. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Familiesbroadcasts from the Lone Star State. Across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher calls in from historical southern Indiana. The OTR duo are joined by Becky Muldrow, veteran homeschooling mama and creator of the Dual Credit at Home study program. This episode uncovers all the details of the quest to obtain high school and college credit for core subjects. Hit the replay to hear more about how homeschoolers can find this important piece of the college puzzle.

What is Dual Credit

Becky is a homeschool mom with an impressive portfolio of her own. Hear more about the Muldrow family and the story behind Dual Credit at Home.  Her passion for homeschooling is transparent as well her knowledge of successfully homeschooling high schoolers. First of all, she shares the facts about dual credit and exactly what it is. Consequently, she reveals that dual credit is more easily obtained by high schoolers in the homeschool community. In addition, the Dual Credit expert lays out the time frame for this high school journey. More info in this interview includes:

  • Who can benefit from dual credit?
  • Why the time frame for beginning this journey is so important?
  • How to study and achieve dual credit for high school and college?
  • What subjects qualify for dual credit?
  • Where to start for mastering the jump start to college?

Dual Credit at Home for Roadschoolers

Moreover, Becky talks about all the facts for graduating high school roadschoolers. She sheds light on many other important topics of the road to homeschool success in secondary education. For example, she details the facts on creating a high school transcript. Listeners get the inside scoop on how CLEP exams save thousands of college dollars . Further, Becky reminds listeners what’s really important during these all important years of a student’s final years of home education.

More about Roadschool Moms

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 150 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. As a result, more and more families are moving into a home on wheels. Further, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

Roadschool Moms:  Season 11


Special Thanks to our Network Sponsor!


We’d like to thank our Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network sponsor Sony and their new movie, The Star, the Story of the First Christmas – Coming in Theaters November 17th!

Visit TheStarMovie.com to learn more.


Andrew Pudewa – LIVE from FPEA

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Andrew Pudewa, founder of Institute for Excellence in Writing, joins Roadschool Moms LIVE from FPEA 2017. Amongst the flurry of the homeschool convention in Orlando, FL, the mastermind behind the IEW shares his flair for the love of writing.

If you are looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure, scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 120 podcast replays.

Roadschool Moms is a live, one-hour weekly broadcast dedicated to the needs and challenges facing today’s roadschool moms. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

Roadschool Record Keeping Made Easy

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

The pencils are sharpened and planner options appear everywhere on the table! The Roadschool Moms duo is sorting it all out. Moreover, with 30 years of Mom-experience, these two fulltime RVing mamas share affiliate links for products used in their own rolling homeschools. Episode four is all about homeschool record keeping for a successful roadschool year!

Record keeping requirements vary depending on the state. But, everyone agrees a record of family learning activities is important. Even unschoolers might record attendance, activities and projects in case of a domicile change. Being prepared helps families stay cool under pressure! As with any system, the best one is the one you will use.

In their usual quest for all the answers, the Roadschool Moms team talks with record keeping expert, Dave, from Homeschool Tracker, on the show. Hit the replay to reveal all the details about this comprehensive and easy-to-use online program from this feature interview:

  • Program for all levels of detailed record keeping
  • Includes grading option and other report features
  • High school transcripts a snap
  • Student access for assignments and more
  • Manages up to 20 students
  • Training webinars and video user guides

Live listeners earn the chance to win an entire year of Homeschool Tracker. Listen in for more details. Those who catch the replay still have a chance to take advantage of a free trial offer.

If a curriculum with integrated record keeping is in your sights, look no further than Time4Learning. This customized, self-paced K-12 program is a great fit for many roadschoolers. The log-in history for each child creates reports and an attendance record. As a result, homeschool portfolios and transcripts come together in a snap. For a free trial, use “roadschooler” to give it a test drive for the next successful roadschool adventure.

Some homeschoolers prefer a paper style record keeping system.  Most noteworthy, Roadschool Moms Sarah James sends her glowing recommendation for A Plan in Place. This site has it all with planners for kids at different age levels or even mom and dad! Shopper options include customized hard-copy planners as well as digital products. This site offers a straightforward way to stay organized.

If you are looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure, scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 120 podcast replays.

Roadschool Moms is a live, one-hour weekly broadcast dedicated to the needs and challenges facing today’s roadschool moms. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.