Boys with Pens, Special Host: Beth Purcell

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Show Notes: LifeSkills101 Podcast - "Boys with Pens" with Special Host, Beth Purcell In this special episode, we welcome Beth Purcell, a renowned writing coach from True North Homeschool Academy. Beth shares her expertise on teaching writing to boys, focusing on their unique linear thinking patterns.Show Notes: LifeSkills101 Podcast – “Boys with Pens” with Special Host, Beth Purcell

In this special episode, we welcome Beth Purcell, a renowned writing coach from True North Homeschool Academy. Beth shares her expertise on teaching writing to boys, focusing on their unique linear thinking patterns.

Watch this LifeSkills 101 Podcast on YouTube Bored with homeschool

Beth starts by explaining linear thinking. It’s a straightforward, logical process that many boys naturally adopt. This way of thinking influences how they approach writing tasks.

Understanding this linear mindset is key to teaching boys effectively. It’s not about changing how they think but leveraging it. Beth suggests strategies that align with their logical progression of ideas.

First, use structured writing assignments.

These provide a clear framework for boys to follow. Outlines and templates can guide their thoughts from start to finish.

Introduce writing exercises that build on their interests.

Topics like sports, science, or technology can motivate boys to write. Engagement increases when they’re invested in the subject matter.

Incorporate visual aids and graphic organizers.

Tools like mind maps help boys plan their writing visually. This method complements their linear thinking style.

Beth emphasizes the importance of short, achievable writing tasks. Breaking down assignments into manageable parts reduces overwhelm. It encourages boys to tackle writing with confidence.

Feedback should be constructive and specific.

Highlight what they’re doing right and where they can improve. This approach fosters a growth mindset towards writing.

Encourage revision as a natural part of the writing process.

Beth suggests showing examples of revised works. This demonstrates that even good writing can be made better with effort.

Beth shares success stories from her coaching experience. These anecdotes illustrate how boys can excel in writing with the right support.

To wrap up, Beth offers encouragement to parents and educators. She assures them that with patience and tailored strategies, boys can become confident writers.

“Boys with Pens” is more than an episode title. It’s a call to recognize and nurture the writing talents of boys everywhere. With Beth Purcell’s guidance, we can help them express their thoughts clearly and creatively.

Join us next time on LifeSkills101 for more insights into educational strategies. Together, we can make a difference in the way our children learn and grow.


Welcome to the Life Skills 101 Podcast, proudly presented by Blue Collar Homeschoolers and the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Whether you’re an experienced homeschooling family or just starting your homeschooling journey, this podcast is your go-to resource for equipping your family with the skills and knowledge needed for a successful future.

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Check out our other podcasts & subscribe.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to provide your family with the best possible homeschooling and career preparation resources. Subscribe to the Life Skills 101 Podcast and stay up-to-date with the latest episodes and valuable insights.

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Strategies for Kids Who Don’t Like Reading or Writing

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Strategies for Kids Who Don't Like Reading or WritingShow Notes: LifeSkills101 Podcast – “Teaching Strategies for Kids Who Don’t Like to Read or Write”

This episode addresses a common challenge: teaching kids who resist reading and writing. We explore strategies to engage these learners and foster a love for literacy.

Watch this LifeSkills 101 Podcast on YouTube Bored with homeschool

First, understand each child’s interests.

Use these topics to spark their curiosity in reading and writing. Tailored content can transform reluctance into eagerness.

Introduce a variety of formats.

Comics, graphic novels, and audiobooks offer alternative pathways to literacy. They make reading more accessible and enjoyable.

Incorporate technology.

Apps and interactive ebooks can make reading and writing more engaging. Technology bridges the gap for reluctant learners.

Create a comfortable reading environment.

A cozy corner with a selection of books invites exploration. Make this space inviting and stress-free.

Encourage reading and writing in daily activities.

Grocery lists, menus, and simple letters incorporate literacy into everyday life. These practical experiences show the value of reading and writing.

Use games to teach literacy skills.

Board games, word games, and online games can improve vocabulary and spelling. Learning through play is effective and fun.

Set aside dedicated time for reading and writing.

Regular practice helps improve skills and confidence. Make this time flexible and pressure-free.

Celebrate progress, no matter how small. Recognition boosts motivation and self-esteem. Celebrate every step forward in their literacy journey.

Incorporate storytelling into your teaching. Encourage kids to create their own stories. This activity builds writing skills and unleashes creativity.

Lastly, be patient and persistent.

Progress may be slow, but with consistent support, kids can develop a love for literacy.

To conclude, teaching kids who don’t like to read or write requires creativity and patience. By making literacy relevant, engaging, and fun, we can open doors to a world of knowledge and imagination.

Join us next time on LifeSkills101 for more educational insights and strategies. Together, we can overcome challenges and inspire a love for learning in all children.


Welcome to the Life Skills 101 Podcast, proudly presented by Blue Collar Homeschoolers and the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Whether you’re an experienced homeschooling family or just starting your homeschooling journey, this podcast is your go-to resource for equipping your family with the skills and knowledge needed for a successful future.

Subscribe and Stay Informed

Check out our other podcasts & subscribe.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to provide your family with the best possible homeschooling and career preparation resources. Subscribe to the Life Skills 101 Podcast and stay up-to-date with the latest episodes and valuable insights.

GRAB YOUR FREE TIMELINE TO HOMESCHOOL SUCCESS RIGHT HERE

Digital Tools to Help you Write a Novel

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Digital tools to help you write a novel

247: Digital tools to help you write a novel

Just in time for NaNaWriMo, guest Jennie Miller shares some digital tools to help you write a novel. These can be used by middle and high schoolers.

The resources Jennie mentions are

Jennie’s online English classes for high school

—————————————————————————————————————-
Take a look at show sponsor, FundaFunda Academy to see what they offer for online classes and web-based unit studies.

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Digital tools to help you write a novel

Writing and Education in Crazy times with Andrew Pudewa of Institute for Excellence in Writing

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

In this week's episode of Life Skills 101 podcast, Andrew Pudewa of IEW fame offers several tips to encourage this skill in crazy times.SPECIAL REPLAY | While Writing isn’t exactly a soft skill, it is an invaluable hard skill that makes a feedback loop with the soft skills. Andrew Pudewa of IEW fame offers several tips to encourage this skill in crazy homeschooling times.

  • The top two things needed for your kids are; Language Skills (liberal arts), and Math skills (Logic/Stem/Arithmetic)
    • Choose what is interesting, but also needed.
  • Teach your kids how to memorize
    • Especially poetry, this will teach them diction, and heavily ingrain a love for language and reading, which in turn will give them a love for learning.
  • The 4 deadly errors of teaching writing:
    • Over correction
    • With holding help- if your child asks for it when writing, they probably need it.
    • Unclear Assignments- Your child cannot follow instructions they don’t understand. Be clear.
    • Over expectation- set a high bar, but be willing to give grace for learners.

 

Resources from IEW

https://iew.com/

  • TWSS
  • Language Acquisition Through Poetry
  • Themed Based Writing Books
    • Ancient History
    • Fables, Myths and Fairy Tales
    • People and Places
    • All things fun and fascination
  • With all of the resources in the world of homeschooling today, you can get the best of both worlds of Public School and Homeschool

True North Homeschool Academy Resources

https://truenorthhomeschoolacademy.com/product-category/english/

  • British Literature
  • ‘Dinner with Shakespeare and Dickens’
  • Literature through the movies

 

Cozy Mystery English Online

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #183, Cozy Mystery English Online, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

Cozy Mystery English Online

In “Cozy Mystery English Online,” Episode, #183, Laura Nolette & Meredith Curtis discuss Meredith’s Who Dun It high school English course online at True North Homeschooling Academy. Writing a novel in high school and creating Who Dun It high school English course has been a win-win for their teens. Who Dun It is fun in a co-op and online classes where students read and write cozy mysteries. This out-of-the-box high school English course is a blessing to many homeschool families who want to experience the adventure of clues, red herrings, plot twists, creating suspects, and leading their detective on a merry chase until the murderer is apprehended.

 

 

 


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Show Notes

Our experience with novel writing in high school and eventually writing a who-dun-it.

Writing a Cozy Mystery

  • Cozy -no gore, clean, focus on solving a puzzle
  • Create detective, sidekick, friends, and suspects (characterization)
  • Create a scene-by-scene plot
  • Suspect’s Motives
  • Clues/Red Herrings
  • Setting/Tone/Mood/Christian Worldview
  • Plot Twists
  • Logic – Wrapping It Up

Who Dun It At Home

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce to Family
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud to Family
  • Get Input from Family
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss with Parents

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature and Writing High School Class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Dun It in Homeschool Co-op

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce in Class
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud
  • Peer Review Writing Club Style
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature & Composition Class at True North Homeschool Academy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Dun It Online

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce in Class
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud
  • Peer Review Writing Club Style
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss

Who Dun It at True North Homeschool Academy

Literature & Composition: Who Dun It

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Literature Resources

Our curriculum works great at home; or in church, homeschool co-ops, and online classes, too! 😊

American Literature & Research British Literature & Writing High School Class Foundations of Western Literature by Meredith Curtis Communications 101:Essays and Speeches High School Class

 


Thank You to our Network Sponsor – CTC Math!

Getting Teens Interested in Writing

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Getting Teens Interested in Writing.

Getting Teens Interested in Writing. Fun ways to ease your teen into becoming more interested and confident in their writing skills!

Getting Teens Interested in Writing

A lot of teens have either had not much experience writing, or they have had negative or overwhelming experiences with writing. So by the time they get to high school, they are just like, Gee, writing. 

How about if we reconstruct writing for our homeschool high schoolers, especially for those who have had those negative experiences or are inexperienced in writing? Let’s reconstruct things for them, so they can learn to write and communicate through writing in a way they actually feel successful in! They just might even enjoy and have fun with it! 

Wouldn’t that be cool?

Wouldn’t that be nice if your teen graduates from homeschool high school and feels confident in their high school writing skills? 

How To Get Your Teens Interested In Writing

First, know that there’s not just one right way to homeschool high school, and there’s not one right way to get writing done. But if we want to reconstruct high school writing and get teens interested, here are some ideas that could help. 

BTW- for more information on goals and grading for writing in homeschool high school, check out this episode.

Start With A Growth Mindset

A lot of times, those teens who come in with the self-doubt or negative writing experience say “writing’s dumb” or “I’m dumb” or “I can’t write.” And because of that, they have a block already about writing. They don’t believe their writing can be successful. 

A growth mindset gives them more confidence. So, instead of saying “I’m bad at writing” or “I hate writing,” they learn to say “I’m not a great writer yet, but I’m learning to be.” Or 

“I’m not there yet, but I’m learning that word, and I’m going to get there.” 

Change the perspective. Adjust the shutdown from “I can’t do this” or “I’m bad at this” to “I’m not there yet, but I’m going to get there.” That change gives teens confidence. It rewires their brain away from shutdown to possibility. Just changing a few words can help them. 

“You’re not there yet, but you’re going to get there.” Say it for them. Work it out with them. Then help them practice that in their writing. It will really help. 

Make Assignments Short and Simple

Another way to get teens interested in high school writing is by making assignments short and simply. Rather than give an inexperienced writer a 10-page research paper and tell them to go for it, and make them follow APA-style down to the letter, pull things back and make assignments short and simple.

Give them materials to work with that are little itsy bitsy bites like in psychology. We call it successive approximations. You take baby steps. One step, and then the next step, and then the next step. And then the next step. One step builds on another. And before you know it, they are capable of doing so much more, and they believe they can too.

So make assignments short and simple. And as often as possible, make them interesting or even fun. They can build on that, and they will go so much more quickly and successfully into the more detailed stuff.

Use Dictation Abilities

Some teens with special needs or who have so much self-doubt in themselves may need to make those early writing steps even easier, such as dictation abilities.

You can:

  • Have them dictate to you
  • Use tools like Dragon Dictation
  • Use voice-to-text

Once their words are in writing, they can do a little formatting and start to feel empowered. 

Try a progressive story for fun and inspiration

Write Together

Another way to get teens interested in writing is by writing together. For example, you can create a progressive story together. 

A progressive story begins with one person starting with a sentence. Then the next person adds on to that sentence, adding to the story. And on and on it goes. One sentence for one person. The sentences build upon each other, creating a story.

  • For example, the first person starts it off with the first sentence. 
    • “Once upon a time, there was a girl named Sally, and she lived in the woods.” 
  • Then you stop after that sentence, and the next person adds to it. 
    • “Sally went for a picnic one day and all of a sudden a big bear came.” 
  • And then the next person adds to it. 
    • “And the bear wanted her picnic and Sally was terrified.”
  • Next the last person says the last sentence.
    • “So Sally tickled the bear, and he ran away. “
  • Then that’s the end of that story. 

Progressive stories like that are silly and nonsensical, but what it gets teens doing is thinking in their creative part of their brain. (And it’s actually the problem-solving part of the brain too!)

These are a few ways to get your teens interested in writing in their homeschool high school years. Start small, and then once they have a little confidence with that, you can give them something a tad bit tougher and start building on that. As you do this, watch their high school writing skills bloom along with their confidence.

Join Vicki for some fun with getting teens interested in writing.

For more inspiration on writing:

Thanks to Richie Soares for help with the post and Seth Tillman for editing the podcast.

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  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
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How Writing on the Computer Helps Kids become Better Writers

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

how writing on the computer helps kids become better writers

181: How Writing on the Computer Helps Kids become Better Writers

Veldorah Rice from Write From the Heart is our guest in this episode and explains how writing on the computer can help kids write better. Be sure to also listen to her episodes on best practices for internet research.

This is the outline of what is covered in this episode.

I. Different types of Writers
a. Reluctant
b. Overachievers/Excited
c. Average—STEM or unexcited but task-oriented

II. Computer eliminates distractions
a. Handwriting
b. Spelling
c. Typing/dictation

III. Computer allows for development and organization
a. Can physically see the underdevelopment
b. Ease of revisions
c. Cut/paste

IV. Computer invites collaboration
a. Easy to send to others
b. Comment directly
c. Assisted learning

V. Computer allows expansion and interdisciplinary learning
a. Typing skills
b. Computer skills
c. Technology projects

–> Grab a free copy of Activities for Reluctant Writers

Be sure to take a look at the English classes (including AP classes) Veldorah offers for middle and high schoolers. You can also find Veldorah on Facebook and Instagram.

—————————————————————————————————————-
Take a look at show sponsor, FundaFunda Academy to see what they offer for online classes and web-based unit studies.

Join our Facebook Group especially for the listeners of this podcast! You can ask questions and get advice as you try integrating technology in your homeschool.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and give a rating and maybe even a review! Subscribing will help you make sure you never miss an episode.

how writing on the computer helps kids become better writers

Goals and Grading Writing for Homeschool High School

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

This week on Homeschool Highschool Podcast: Goals and Grading Writing for Homeschool High School.

Goals and Grading Writing for Homeschool High School

Goals and Grading Writing for Homeschool High School

For homeschool high schoolers, one of the most time consuming components of English/Language Arts is the writing. Then one of the most time-consuming components of ELA for homeschooling parents is the grading and goal-setting process. We receive so many questions on goals and grading writing that we decided we should talk about it here on the podcast.

Let’s start with grading. Here is the simple answer for grading writing assignments: Use a rubric!

What’s a rubric?

A rubric is a tool that helps homeschool parents know what value to assign each aspect of their teens’ writing assignments. There are a gazillion ways to create a rubric, based on what is being emphasized in each writing project.

Where do you find rubrics?

You can create you own rubrics or download one off the internet (there are SO many variations on the internet, so you will find something that feels right to you).

For your convenience, we 7Sisters have saved you the time and trouble and included rubrics in our writing curriculum for:

You can even adjust the rubrics to fit your goals for your homeschool high schoolers!

Goals for writing in homeschool high school

Which leads us to the next questions that we receive so often:

  • “I don’t know what the goals should be for my teens’ writing each year. Help?”
  • “I don’t really like writing myself, so how can I set goals for my teens?”
  • “How can I know the priorities for writing?”

Let us help out a bit. Let’s define what the most helpful goals for writing can be. (Remember, there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school, so you adapt our advice to your own family’s needs.)

Goals for writing: What is the heart and soul of writing?

One of the things we have noticed over the years is that sometimes writing curriculum focuses so much on the mechanics of writing (spelling, grammar, punctuation) that there is absolutely nothing left for fun or inspiration.

Teens often need purpose, meaning and inspiration in their writing. Teens often do best when they know the “WHY” of writing. Do you know the why of writing, BTW?

The purpose of writing is communication!

The purpose of writing is communication.

The purpose of writing is communicating so that people understand what teens are feeling, thinking, learning, being inspired by. So they should ask themselves for each assignment, “What am I trying to communicate here?”

  • For instance, in a comparison and contrast essay about something. The purpose is to help the reader understand what you thought about the similarities and differences of whatever is being compared.
  • For a research paper, the purpose is to communicate what your teen has learned about a subject while doing their research on the topic. (As opposed to the idea that a research paper is about a teen’s opinion about what they are learning. The goal of research papers is information presentation, not opinion presentation.)

One of the best gifts we can give our teens is lots of practice organizing and communicating their thoughts. High school writing can help train teens on thinking and sharing those thoughts through life.

If a teen starts a writing project with those goals in mind, and the grader keeps those goals in mind, life will be easier for both! SO, start out each writing project with a discussion with parent and teen on the goals. Make it clear. Go over the rubric together.

BTW- We 7Sisters have graded SO many papers over the many years of teaching our kids and others. It has not been unusual for teens to complain about writing. However, after graduation and teens have entered adulthood, they have often come back to us and said, “thanks for all the writing”!

Also, know that grading and goals will vary for teens who have different abilities

All teens are different. This is good. So grading cannot be one-size-fits-all!

  • Teens who struggle with reading and writing, will need a simpler rubric and adaptations of goals.
    • BTW-if you have a struggling writer, go easy on the red-pen corrections. Instead, work together on several revisions with lots of encouragement.
  • A teen who is headed to college as a humanities major will need lots of writing with higher-level thinking and word usage. Adapt your rubrics to their needs.
  • Teens who are reluctant but able, need to concentrate on fun, short assignments at first, then gradually grow the assignments.
  • Teens who overthink things, need page limits.

So think about what your teens’ abilities, personalities and goals for after graduation are. As the parent, you know your teens and their needs. Adapt goals and grading to fit those needs.

For lots more information on writing requirements and grading for homeschool high schoolers, check out 7Sisters Authoritative Guide post.

Join Sabrina and Vicki for an informative discussion on goals and grading for homeschool high school writing.

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  1. Follow this link to our Apple Podcasts page.
  2. OR take this IMPORTANT STEP: Under our Homeschool Highschool Podcast logo, click on View in “…your favorite podcast source”
  3. This will take you to Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast source and our own podcast page.
  4. Click SUBSCRIBE.
  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE VIA iPHONE

  1. Tap the purple Podcast icon on your phone
  2. Tap the search icon on the bottom-right of your screen
  3. In the search bar type: Homeschool Highschool Podcast
  4. Tap the Homeschool Highschool Podcast icon
  5. Tap *Subscribe*
  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review*

How to Use Who-Dun-It Curriculum in a Homeschool Co-op

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #129, How to Use Who-Dun-It Curriculum in a Homeschool Co-op, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

How to Use Who-Dun-It Curriculum in a Homeschool Co-op

In “How to Use Who-Dun-It Curriculum in a Homeschool Co-op,” Episode, #129, Meredith Curtis explains how to use her most popular English course, Who Dun It Murder Mystery Literature & Writing, in a homeschool co-op setting. It’s easier than you think to teach, homeschool Mom or Dad! Teens love sharing their stories together and discussing classic cozy mysteries in book club. Plus what other course requires you to watch a detective show once a month? The student benefits—logic, creativity, literature understanding deepens, and FUN—enrich high schoolers educational experience and create happy lifetime memories!

 

 


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Show Notes

Welcome to our cozy mystery peer review time. We are mesmorized by the story, trying to figure out the clues.

This is much too fun for a high school English class! Or is it?

When It’s Your Turn to Teach at Co-op

It’s your turn to teach the high school English course and you are stumped.

I have a fun solution!

Mystery lovers unite!

Spend a year reading and writing a cozy mystery

Benefits of Writing a Who-Dun-It

Opportunity (or challenge) of creating a story that others will enjoy

Writing your own literature teaches you so much about literature

The role of logic

Craftsmanship

Reading aloud to edit/craft

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature and Writing High School Class

An Overview of The Year

First half:

  • Reading/watching/analyzing
  • Creating characters/settings/scenes
  • Write short story

Second half:

  • Novels/short stories
  • Work on novel
  • Peer review & crafting as you go

The Planning Is Already Done

How the course is laid out

Work at home

Work in co-op

Creating Characters & Using Dialogue & Description

How do golden age authors do it?

Well-rounded characters

Quotation marks

Close your eyes and listen—can you see it?

Classic Literature & Substitutes

Christie, Sayers, Chesterton, Doyle

Children’s classics: Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, Mandie, Sugar Creek Gang

Golden Age Classic Mysteries—excellent literature!

Why Book Clubs Help So Much

Talking helps brain connect information

Differing opinions lead to lively discussions

Start with “Did you like this book—why or why not?”

Each book club focus: characterization, setting, dialogue, tone/mood, plot

Why TV Shows Help So Much

Scenes

Storyboard

Perry Mason, Murder She Wrote, Monk, Garage Sale Murders, Matlock

Writing for Peers vs. Writing for No One

When you are reading stories aloud, you have a purpose, an incentive

How writers have grown with this

Responding with affirmation and helpful advice, not critical

Unleashing Creativity

Creating characters, settings, plots, scenes, dialogue, surprise endings—hard work but fun!

Who Dun It Murder Mystery Literature & Writing changes students

The Logic of a Who-Dun-It

Have to make sure everything lines up, is logical, makes sense

Did the reader get enough clues to solve mystery? “How did I miss that!”

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Resources

Our one-credit high school courses use conversational text, living books, hands-on learning, and projects that prepare teens for real life! Enjoy!

 

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature and Writing High School Class Economics, Finances, and Business Economics, Finances, and Business Answer Key HIS Story of the 20th Century by Meredith Curtis
American Literature & Research British Literature & Writing High School Class Communications 101:Essays and Speeches High School Class Foundations of Western Literature by Meredith Curtis
Newspaper Reporting by Meredith Curtis Government: God's Blueprint/Man's Agenda by Meredith Curtis at Powerline Productions Worldview Understanding the Times by Meredith Curtis HIS Story of the 20th Century: High School Workbook by Meredith Curtis

More Podcasts You Might Find Helpful

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #120, Why I Wrote My Own Government Course, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #114, Easy DIY 5-Year Homeschool High School Flexible Plan, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network Finish Well Homeschooling Podcast, Podcast #108, 7 Ways to Make Jesus Lord of Your Homeschooling with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network Finish Well Radio Show, Podcast #106, 7 Reasons I Teach Newspaper Reporting In Middle School with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

Motivating Boys to Write – MBFLP 250

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

If you’re homeschooling a boy (or just helping your son with his homework!) you’ve probably seen his frustration about writing. Yet the ability to put thoughts into words and words onto paper is a crucial skill for life and career. How can you get past his natural hesitation and open up that channel for communication? This episode we talk about some of the reasons why your boy may hate to write, and then, practical ways to overcome those hurdles!