Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literary Study

LCP Ep 8: Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literary Study

 

Book Report and Literary Study Ideas #homeschooling #homeschool #languagearts #reading #bookreports #literaturestudy #literarystudy #elementary #middleschool #highschool #literarycafepodcast

 

Running out of ideas for what to do when your learner finishes reading a book?

Are you looking for book report ideas or ways to conduct a literary study and keep your learner interested?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

 

Join Katie Glennon as she shares tons of fun and creative out of the box Book Report and Literary Study Ideas to get even your most reluctant reader excited about reading.

You’ll be surprised and excited by the ways you can use your child’s strengths, interests, learning styles, and talents to capture their interest in reading and conducting a literary study while learning about literary devices and story elements and practicing different kinds and levels of thinking skills at the same time.

Show Notes

 

I usually present to my students and my own children different choices of activities after reading a book where I want them to do some of kind of literary analysis or learn specific skills and concepts. The activity would focus on that skill and concept, but the type of activity would be geared to the learners’ learning styles, personal interests and talents so that they will be motivated and interested.

These activities are geared toward specific skills or concepts that are included in the literary and story elements for the book, but are of a nature to make sure to capture the interest of the learner.

The ideas below are just a list of ideas that are fully explained in the Podcast and summarized with descriptions in this printable handout – Descriptions of Out of the Box Book Report and Literary Study Ideas to Motivate your Readers pdf

Book Report and Literary Study Ideas Geared toward the Visual Learner

 

Construct a mobile

Write an advice column

Character email or letter exchange

Character Facebook Page

Journal or Diary

Character Resume and Cover Letter

Character Dossier

Retell the story from a different point of view

Symbolic Time Capsule or Museum Exhibit or Suitcase or Collection

3 D Relief Map or a Diorama (For Hands-on learner as well)

Photo Album

Foldable Display Board

Drawing Projects (Book Jacket, Comic Strip, Collage, Flip Book or Trading Cards)

Mini Quilt

Charts (Timeline,  plot map, analogy chart, Literary Devices Chart, Compare and Contrast Books or Authors)

Wordle

 

Ideas for the more Auditory Learner

 

Drama (Acting as a character or author, a monologue, a speech, a dramatic reading, a mock trial, puppet show)

Write poetry, songs, or raps

Book Club (just discussions, a tea, a party centered around a book with costumes as characters, theme games and refreshments)

Audio or Video Recording (talk show interview as a character or an author)

Radio Play (Imitate an old fashioned radio show with sound effects and character voices of a scene)

Videos (News report, movie trailer, commercial, sales pitch – recording video or using animation software or creating movie with Power Point or Prezi)

 

Ideas Geared toward Hands-on Learners

 

Games(Create board game or a game to play, or scavenger hunt)

Cooking and Baking

 

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share that your family has used in engaging your reluctant reader! Any great book titles or authors to suggest? I would love to hear from you!

 

Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for November’s topic when we discuss why you should study the classics and the benefits! You’ll be surprised by what your learner will receive from reading these books that have withstood the test of time and why many people treasure them and read them over and over!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page!

Book Report and Literary Study Ideas #homeschooling #homeschool #languagearts #reading #bookreports #literaturestudy #literarystudy #elementary #middleschool #highschool #literarycafepodcast

 

 

LCP 08: Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Reports and Literary Study

Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage your Reluctant Reader

LCP Ep 7: Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage your Reluctant Reader

 

Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage Reluctant Readers #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reluctantreaders #booksforreluctantreaders #funreadingideas

Do you have a reader who is “reluctant” or has no interest in reading? Is it a battle to get them to show any interest in a book?

This is a common problem and you are not alone. I fought that battle and overcame it while teaching in the classroom and in our homeschool!

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she discusses fun ways to engage your learners in reading and offers suggestions of kinds of books and book titles to capture your child’s interest in a story. There are plenty of activity suggestions for all ages to get everyone in your home reading and enjoying it. Reading can be a fun, interactive experience instead of a chore.

Show Notes

Suggested Books and Activities for Reluctant Readers pdf (Printable for you to download)

Suggested Books and Activities for Reluctant Readers

Mostly For your Younger Readers

Books and Activities for Cooking

Hedgehog Bakes a Cake by Maryann Macdonald

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis (upper elementary) Turkish Delight

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien (middle and high school) Hobbit Food

The Lord of the Rings series (high school) Second Breakfast

12 Recipes Inspired by your Favorite Children’s Books

31 Recipes Inspired by Popular Children’s Books

Books to Inspire Cooking with Children

 

Books with Printable Mini Books and Manipulatives (Story Props)

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

More The Very Hungry Caterpillar printables

Make Your own Books – Gingerbread Man

Make Your own Books – ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

Make Your own Books – Little Red Riding Hood

Almost 100 Story Patterns to Use

 

Circular or Chain Stories with Predictable Patterns

Predictable Books

 

Funny Unexpected Stories

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka

Who Pushed Humpty Dumpty? By David Levinthal

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems

There is a Bird on your Head by Mo Willems

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin

Giggle, Giggle, Quack: Duck for President by Doreen Cronin

The Hoboken Chicken Emergency by Daniel Pinkwater

Anansi Trickster Tales – Anansi and the Moss Covered Rock

 

Seasonal and Holiday Activities for Themed Books

Fun Fall Ideas with a Printable Fall Scavenger Hunt

Fun Ideas for Fall #homeschool #homeschooling #fallreading #fallactivities #literarycafepodcast #reluctantreader #readingfun #makereadingfun

Reading Incentive Programs

Pizza Hut Book It Program

Barnes and Noble Summer Reading Program

Chuck E. Cheese Rewards

Six Flags

Reading Rewards

 

Interactive Doodle or Draw Your Own Story and Pick Your Own Adventure Books

Draw It Yourself Adventures

Doodle Adventures

Choose Your Own Adventure

Choose Your Own Story– Minecraft

An Interactive History Adventure

 

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share that your family has used in engaging your reluctant reader! Any great book titles or authors to suggest? I would love to hear from you!


Special Thanks to our Network Sponsor, Kiwi Crate!

 

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Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for October’s topic when we discuss thinking outside the box for book reports! They don’t have to be boring! And I’ve got some fun and great ideas to share with you that you will want to try!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page!

Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage Reluctant Readers #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reluctantreaders #booksforreluctantreaders #funreadingideas

 

 

LCP 07 Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage your Reluctant Reader

What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study

LCP Ep 4: What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study

 

Join Katie at the Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study #homeschool #homeschooling #language arts #elementary school

How are you going to homeschool Language Arts with your elementary aged children? Does the idea of teaching your child to read or write stress you out? Do you wonder if  you are teaching everything you need to during the elementary school years for what is called “Language Arts”? And how are you going to cover everything plus other subjects during the day?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she discusses what skills and concepts you should include in your Language Arts study during the elementary school years. Listen for practical tips and suggested curriculum and resources to help you and your learners use your time efficiently, effectively, and economically in teaching and learning Language Arts in your homeschool. She will also give you fun learning ideas to address learners in your home with different learning styles.

The Five Areas of Language Arts you should include in the Elementary School Years

What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study  (Printable for you to download)

Reading

Use a Phonics based program or curriculum that starts with letters and moves to vowel sounds and vowel combinations, then moves to consonant blends. These programs will also include when to introduce specific sight words.

Use a multisensory approach to be able to address all learning styles and multiple learners in your family. At early ages, it may be difficult to determine your child’s learning style. Not only use different ways to look at words and hear the sounds for your visual and auditory learners, but address your kinesthetic learners with assorted hands-on activities.d

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Reading

Foundations – Logic of English (K-1)

Hooked on Phonics (K-2)

Bob Books – Early Readers to Supplement your programs

Explode the Code (K-4)

Phonics Pathways (K-2)

McRuffy Language Arts (K-4)

All About Reading (K-4)

Reading for Grades 3-4 – After Phonics and Developing Fluency

After your child is ready to move on from learning to read to reading larger chunks of material and has begun to develop fluency, you will want to introduce other reading skills such as comprehension and higher order thinking skill questions and other skills.

These skills include –

  • recalling detail
  • making inferences and predictions
  • using context clues
  • identifying main ideas
  • learning the elements of a story – plot, conflict, setting, characters, point of view, theme
  • literary devices and writing techniques such as similes and metaphors
  • Introduce the study of vocabulary and vocabulary skills

We used a combination of novels and study guides; an anthology for other forms of writing such as essays, speeches, poetry, short stories, and plays; and reading novels or “living books” aloud together that were tied to our history or social studies.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Reading for Grades 3-4

Bob Jones University – Book Links

Total Language Plus 

Progeny Press

Mosdos Press Literature Anthologies

Handwriting

Along with learning to identify and make the sounds of letters and able to read simple words, you will want to eventually include handwriting those letters and words. Before you begin handwriting, you will want to make sure your learner has the fine motor skills to hold the pencil and make the formation of the letters.

You can develop fine motor skills by using safety scissors and tracing lines and assorted shapes with a pencil. You can also practice using the pincers with tweezers or play (larger-size) tweezers to pick up objects including pony beads and doing sorting activities.

Start with cursive or D’Nealian cursive instead of manuscript or printing. This is easier for early writers because their hands and arms do not leave the paper and it is a more continuous and smooth motion. They do not have to worry about picking up the pencil and where to place it to continue to draw each letter.

You can make your own handwriting worksheets to go along with your Phonics program and spelling lists.

https://www.handwritingworksheets.com/

Spelling

Spelling as a subject should be closely related to what your child is learning or has learned with their Phonics program. If you tie the learning of word families from the Phonics program to handwriting and spelling with the same word lists, you have taken three parts of your Language Arts programs and have effectively and efficiently tied them together with meaningful learning.

Use a program that is based on Phonics and word families in the same word lists. This makes the words and lessons more meaningful and easier to master.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Spelling

Building Spelling Skills by Christian Liberty Press

All About Spelling

Vocabulary – Grades 3-4

Use the vocabulary words from the novels and anthology you are reading. Separate vocabulary workbooks can be dry and boring and not very effective. Using vocabulary from the context of novels and reading from an anthology give the vocabulary words meaning and a foundation for your learners to understand and remember those words. I have found this a more effective and better use of learning time.

Writing and Composition

We began writing sentences when my littles were learning to read. I had them draw a picture from something we read aloud and they would dictate to me a sentence telling me what that picture was about. I would write it down as they said it so they would see the connection between their words and my writing.

We moved on from there to continuing our read aloud time and we used a Charlotte Mason technique of “narration” where my children would retell a chapter of something we just read or a short story like a fable, folktale, or fairytale. This required them to organize their thoughts in their heads before they retold the story and while they were telling me the story. These are important skills a writer should have before they write their thoughts on paper.

This retelling is easier to use in starting to write something on paper instead of having to come up with their own story and content. They can concentrate on writing a summary of what they have heard. I would have my little guys draw a scene from what we read and tell me a sentence about that picture. I would then have them write a sentence, one word at a time, from what they just told me. Any misspelled words (usually two at a time) would then become part of that week’s spelling list. Soon my guys would be writing two sentences and by the end of the year an entire page of sentences using this retelling technique.

We used several resources to build on adding details to these sentences and then moved onto the proper paragraph format.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Writing and Composition

Write a Super Sentence by Evan Moor

Paragraph Writing by Evan Moor

Writing Fabulous Sentences and Paragraphs

Here is a bundle of notebooking pages that we used for our written narration that I mentioned in the podcast to develop our writing skills. There is a set for different subject areas that we used to either make our own books or put into a 3 ring binder to put together a notebook of our writing and what we learned in that subject that year.

Make Your Own ABC Book Notebooking Pages Bundle Set

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share that your family has used in your Language Arts or any of these ideas from this podcast you found helpful! I would love to hear from you! Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for July’s topic when we discuss what to include in your study of language arts in your homeschool for your middle and high school learners!

Make sure you subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast at iTunes so you don’t miss an episode or by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page!

Join Katie at the Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study #homeschool #homeschooling #language arts #elementary school

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage.


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Tips for Actively Reading Any Piece of Literature

actively readingIt’s easy to get distracted when reading, especially in today’s digital society where something is always beeping, buzzing, or dinging. Our attentions are pulled in a million different directions. We could all use a little help when it comes to focusing on a single task. In this blog post, I’ll be discussing some tips on something we do every day: reading! And not just any type of reading, but actively reading.

Just like a great athlete must undergo deep practice to become skilled at his or her game, an expert reader must practice good habits when it comes to reading. Actively reading is akin to this type of deep practice.

Here are some podcasts with great literature suggestions.

Best Summer Reading

Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

Literature In Your Homeschool

Tip #1: Set Yourself Up for Success

When I am actively reading something, I have pens, pencils, markers, highlighters, and an array of colored pencils by my side — these are my tools for success.

For example, if I actively read a novel, there are few pages that don’t have some underlined or circled word, a question scribbled in the margin, or a highlighted phrase. Come up with a process that works for you and find the tools that best suit it.

Tip #2: Ask Questions

An inquiring mind learns. In order for true knowledge acquisition to occur during an actively reading session, the reader must ask themselves questions to stay engaged with the literature.

Below, I have shared a series of questions that are useful for readers starting to actively read. My high school freshman English teacher used them to guide our literary learning throughout the year. They proved to be a great base for engaging with different texts and served me well after. These questions can be most readily applied to novels and poetry; however, they can be adapted to really any piece of literature. The questions are broken up into the following sections: characters, setting, plot, symbols and other devices, point of view, themes, irony, and newly imagined.

CHARACTER
• Who is the protagonist and who or what is the antagonist?
• What words come to mind when you think about the protagonist or the antagonist?
• How is he, she, or it characterized?
• What motivates this character’s actions?
• What is memorable about the character?
• Is the author’s depiction of the character the same throughout the entire text?
• Are there any surprises? If so what are they?

SETTING
• Where does the story take place? Is the setting: geographical, physical, magical, socio-economic, chronological?
• Locate and specify the various types of setting. What does such specific setting contribute to the overall effect of the story (thematically or in terms of character)?
• When the setting changes where does it change to and how does the change impact the story?

PLOT
• Briefly, what is going on?
• What structure does the story follow (e.g. Freytag)?
• Where in the story are the main points?
• What are the conflicts? Where in the story are they?
• Are the conflicts internal or external? Are they physical, intellectual, societal, moral, or emotional?
• Is the main conflict between sharply differentiated entities (e.g. good versus evil), or is it more subtle and complex?
• Does the plot have unity? Are all the episodes relevant to the total meaning or effect of the story?
• Is the ending happy, unhappy, or indeterminate? Is it fairly achieved?

SYMBOLS AND OTHER DEVICES
• Does the story make use of symbols?
• What kind does the author use (names, objects, actions)?
• What does each symbol mean?
• Does the symbol carry or merely reinforce the meaning of the story?
• What other devices does the author use (e.g. imagery, metaphor, personification, pathos, allusions, aphorisms)? How are they used? What meaning does their use lend to the story?

POINT OF VIEW
• What point of view does the story use?
• Is it consistent in its use of this point of view?
• If shifts in point of view are made are they justified?
• If the point of view is that of one of the characters does that character have any limitations that affect her/his interpretation of events or persons?

THEME
• Does the story have a theme?
• What is it? Is it implicit or explicit?
• Does the theme reinforce or oppose popular notions of life?
• Does it furnish a new insight or refresh or deepen an old one?
• Remember, a theme is an opinion rather like a thesis statement not simply a topic.

IRONY
• Does the story anywhere utilize irony? If so what kind and how? What functions do the ironies serve?

NEWLY IMAGINED
• Compared to other things you have read is there something new, unique, or different about the way the author presents this story or poem?

Special Replay: The Best Way to Teach Reading

best way to teach readingThe almost militant battle of how to best teach reading has been waged over the last 150+ years with proponents from both sides being adamant about their recommendations.  As the reading curriculum pendulum has swung back and forth from phonics to sight to phonics the controversy roars on with little attention given to anything except technique. This narrow view of reading has resulted in millions of individuals being diagnosed with dyslexia and other reading and language delays.

With the introduction of learning styles even more reading techniques abound.  Phonics is an auditory approach to reading. One must hold each sound in auditory short-term memory long enough to get the word “sounded out”. If the child’s auditory short-term memory (processing) is low, phonics doesn’t work well, and the parents typically finds themselves moving from one phonics program to the next.  This is often the case in the home school community because phonics is viewed as “THE” best way to teach reading.  Don’t get me wrong; I love phonics and it is a terrific way to teach reading IF the child has good auditory processing. If not, there is frustration, tears and feelings of low self-esteem.

A visual learner might pick up sight words easily but struggle with phonics because of the learner’s visual bend.  For the tactile learner, reading is a real challenge as it is time consuming and inefficient to create each word you need to learn out of pipe cleaners or the like.

In this episode, the Brain Coach will give you tips on what functions must be working well in the brain for reading to take place as she reveals the best way to teach reading.

 

Don’t miss the handout attached here with links to pertinent information and discounts.

Visit our sponsor –LittleGiantSteps.com

College Transition from Roadschool

 

College transition from high school is on the table in episode #144 that comes to you live from the Roadschool Moms team on the road. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  broadcasts from the a sweltering location that recorded 113 degree temperatures earlier in the day in southern Utah. Across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher chimes in from the central Missouri along Route 66. The ORT dynamic duo are joined tonight by veteran roadschooling mom, Tara Weed who recently graduated her son from high school and beamed with pride as he went off to college without a hitch!

The big transition. As homeschoolers, we face what seems like a constant bombarding of questions regarding the success of our roadschoolers pending success, or lack thereof. Do they have friends? Are they get the proper “socialization?” Do they measure up to public school kids? In an answer, we really don’t know. Shockingly, the same is true of our public school mamas. When it comes down to it, only you know what’s best for your family. Building the confidence in yourself as a roadschool mom and giving your roadschoolers the tools to build their foundation for the same is critical to the layers of education built during these years. This episode brings specific examples and loads of encouragement to help navigate the waters from roadschool to college.
Throughout the podcast, Tara speaks about her son Brennan’s recent experience, of adjusting to college life while joining the National Guard to pay for it. She reflects back on their decision to unschool their boys and the benefits that have came from that positive experience over the years. Tara admits that at one point, her son wasn’t sure college was the next step in his education; however, this roadschool mom kept the roadschool journey on a road that could easily turn in any direction.
Many recommendations come out of this positively powerhouse packed episode to recognize the value of a roadschooling lifestyle. Tara reflects on how her son prepared for the SAT (through Khan Academy.) She reveals that this online resource bridged the gap in the areas where her roadschooler needed help (specifically in math.) She further revealed that taking a few classes at a community college that aligned with their travels also helped prepare her son for the steps necessary to successfully enroll in a college of his choice. Tara advises roadschool moms to encourage their homeschooler to picture himself in the college or university where he sees himself. Wherever that is, do the research to market your roadschooler to that institution. Make that school want your roadschooler as much as she wants to be admitted there. Much of Tara’s advise is common sense; however, her genuine reflection is a breath of fresh air in this daunting subject. For more great tips on transitioning your high schoolers to college, hit the replay below to hear more including Tara’s absolute must have books Guerilla Learning and Teenage Liberation Handbook.

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

Roadschool Moms:  Season 11

Discovering Dyslexia and Reading Issues in Your Child

Discovering Dyslexia and Reading Issues in Your ChildRichele and Lindsey both have dyslexic children and understand how hard it is to see your child struggle through reading lessons. Join them as they discuss how they discovered their children had dyslexia and the steps they took to help. Their hope is that they can help you navigate troubled reading waters and sail into victory!

Website:  http://talkingmom2mom.com

 

Community on the Road: The Great American Eclipse

Episode #142 comes to you live from on the road and the Roadschool Moms team. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  broadcasts from the Bend, Oregon, site of SolarFest 2017. Across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher sits this one out from Carbondale, Illinois. Kimberly is joined by a  group of roadschool moms with her on-site at FtF hangout geared for The Great American Eclipse 2017.

This episode is a chatfest packed with great information for fulltime, RVing families looking for resources to connect with other like-minded families on the road. Events such as the eclipse bring together families on one location to encourage and support one another in this community.

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

The Official Sponsor for Season 10 of Roadschool Moms