Strategies for Kids Who Don’t Like Reading or Writing

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Strategies for Kids Who Don't Like Reading or WritingShow Notes: LifeSkills101 Podcast – “Teaching Strategies for Kids Who Don’t Like to Read or Write”

This episode addresses a common challenge: teaching kids who resist reading and writing. We explore strategies to engage these learners and foster a love for literacy.

Watch this LifeSkills 101 Podcast on YouTube Bored with homeschool

First, understand each child’s interests.

Use these topics to spark their curiosity in reading and writing. Tailored content can transform reluctance into eagerness.

Introduce a variety of formats.

Comics, graphic novels, and audiobooks offer alternative pathways to literacy. They make reading more accessible and enjoyable.

Incorporate technology.

Apps and interactive ebooks can make reading and writing more engaging. Technology bridges the gap for reluctant learners.

Create a comfortable reading environment.

A cozy corner with a selection of books invites exploration. Make this space inviting and stress-free.

Encourage reading and writing in daily activities.

Grocery lists, menus, and simple letters incorporate literacy into everyday life. These practical experiences show the value of reading and writing.

Use games to teach literacy skills.

Board games, word games, and online games can improve vocabulary and spelling. Learning through play is effective and fun.

Set aside dedicated time for reading and writing.

Regular practice helps improve skills and confidence. Make this time flexible and pressure-free.

Celebrate progress, no matter how small. Recognition boosts motivation and self-esteem. Celebrate every step forward in their literacy journey.

Incorporate storytelling into your teaching. Encourage kids to create their own stories. This activity builds writing skills and unleashes creativity.

Lastly, be patient and persistent.

Progress may be slow, but with consistent support, kids can develop a love for literacy.

To conclude, teaching kids who don’t like to read or write requires creativity and patience. By making literacy relevant, engaging, and fun, we can open doors to a world of knowledge and imagination.

Join us next time on LifeSkills101 for more educational insights and strategies. Together, we can overcome challenges and inspire a love for learning in all children.


Welcome to the Life Skills 101 Podcast, proudly presented by Blue Collar Homeschoolers and the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network. Whether you’re an experienced homeschooling family or just starting your homeschooling journey, this podcast is your go-to resource for equipping your family with the skills and knowledge needed for a successful future.

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Ultimate List of Read Alouds for Your Homeschool

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

I wasn’t homeschooled, but I can remember loving library time in elementary school. It wasn’t just the books or the break away from the regular classroom. It was sitting on the big round rug listening to the librarian read aloud.

This post sponsored by:Night Zookeeper | Fantastically Fun Learning

Night Zookeeper is a children’s brand on a mission to make learning fantastically fun and help kids unlock their creativity. Our reading & writing program has helped over 1 million children aged 6-12 to develop their reading, writing, and creative thinking skills.

 

The Benefits of Read Alouds in Your Homeschool

ultimate homeschool read aloud book list

There are studies that demonstrate that read-alouds can improve pronunciation, reading speed, and a student’s ability to make connections while reading. Further, “Reading aloud to young children, particularly in an engaging manner, promotes emerging literacy and language development and supports the relationship between child and parent.”1

Beyond studies, as homeschooling parents, we understand that adding read-alouds to our homeschool can foster much more than an improvement in reading and a love for it, it can foster relationship. Relationship is fundamental to a successful homeschooling experience for our families.

 

How to Read Aloud

This might seem obvious. You choose a book and you begin reading aloud. Couldn’t be simpler, right? There are some tips and techniques that can make your read-aloud time a better experience for everyone.

  1. Practice reading aloud. Vary your cadence. Use fun voices for certain characters if that seems fun to you!
  2. Pick a book YOU love when you first begin. If your favorite book is a longer one, try reading just a few chapters at a time, finding a stopping point that leaves them wanting more. This also teaches your child the art of savoring a book for themselves in their own reading. Stumped, this resource is a great guide.
  3. Keep a list of lists. Books lists will help you know the classics, the tried-and-true, the most-loved books. Suggestions: Caldecott winners, homeschooling read-aloud lists, the 1,000 Good Books List, and the Vintage Homeschool Mom reading list podcast. 
  4. Take turns! You don’t have to be the only reader! Even the littlest of your children can take a turn in the read-aloud seat!
  5. Make use of audiobooks and let the narrator take the role of teacher. This works wonderfully during long drives and the dinner-making routine. You can find a wide selection at your library or even Audible.com. Our all-time favorite family read-aloud was Where The Red Fern Grows. Other favorites include The Courage of Sarah Noble, Heidi, and David Copperfield.

What if I Don’t Like Reading Aloud?

If you don’t like reading aloud, it’s likely due to one of the following:

  • it’s a new concept to you and the learning curve seems too great
  • you’ve never developed a love of reading
  • you’re scared of failing
  • you’re tired after a day of homeschooling and homemaking or working and you don’t need to add one more thing to your list

I understand! You don’t have to be perfect at reading aloud, you just have to begin! It’ll be an adventure! Make use of some of the techniques above and master the new skill or allow others (your own children and audiobooks) to help you!

Ultimate List of Read Alouds for Your Homeschool

Elementary

1. Misty of Chincoteague by Margueritte Henry
2. The Secret Garden by Frances Burnett
3. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo
4. The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes
5. Tornado by Betsy Byars
6. The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dalgliesh
7. Bright April by Marguerite De Angeli
8. My Father’s Dragon series by Ruth Stiles Gannet
9. The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson This one we still quote to this day! So many funnies. Worth the audio version.
10. The Sword in the Tree by Clyde Robert Bulla
11. Runaway Ralph by Beverly Cleary
12. The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne
13. Star of Light by Patricia St. John
14. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
15. The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Warner
16. The Green Ember by S.D. Smith
17. The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
18. Walter the Lazy Mouse by Marjorie Flack
19. Mary on Horseback by Rosemary Wells
20. The Matchlock Gun by Walter D. Edmonds
21. Sox by Beverly Cleary Read belly-laughs happen with this one!
22. The Year of Miss Agnes by Kirkpatrick Hill Miss Agnes is the type of teacher every homeschool mom aspires to be. <3
23. A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond
24. The Trumpet of the Swan by E.B. White
25. Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
26. Rabbit Hill by Robert Lawson
27. The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois A favorite of my kids when they were in the 8-10 year-old range.
28. Riding the Pony Express by Clyde Robert Bulla
29. Justin Morgan Had a Horse by Marguerite Henry This was wonderful to read around Kentucky Derby time.
30. Twenty and Ten by Claire Huchet Bishop An introduction to WW2 for youngers.
31. The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare
32. Henry Huggins by Beverly Cleary Both my boys loved this one!
33. The Apple and the Arrow by Mary and Conrad Buff
34. Treasury for Children by James Herriot I love all things James Herriot, and for the parents, the BBC series is a must.
35. The Reluctant Dragon by Kenneth Grahame  Children love this “put yourself in the place of” imagining of a dragon during the time of St. George the Dragonslayer.
36. Mice of the Herring Bone by Tim Davis Growing up on Highlights magazine, I fell in love with this series of how the ordinary can do extraordinary things.
37. Centerburg Tales by Robert McCloskey Homer Price belongs on every bookshelf.
38. The Chocolate Touch by Patrick Skene Catling Can you have too much of a good thing?
39. The Adventures of Peter Cottontail by Thorton Burgess Burgess books were my first exposure to the living books classification. A happy discovery!
40. Betsy-Tacy Books by Maud Hart Lovelace
41. The Wilderking Trilogy by Jonathan Rogers I loved this more than my kids, but still made the list.
42. The Bears of Hemlock Mountain by Alice Dalgliesh
43. Joel, A Boy of Galilee by Annie Fellows Johnston This one is special to me. Not only did I love the book, but lived down the road from Pewee Valley, KY, the author’s town.
44. My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George
45. Pollyanna by Eleanor Porter
46. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIHM by Robert C. O’Brien We also enjoyed the motion picture.
47. Ribsy by Beverly Cleary
48. The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden
49. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
50. Who Owns the Sun by Stacy Chbosky
51.  The Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle
52. The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dalgliesh

Middle School | High School Reading List (yes, you can read aloud in the upper grades)

 

53. Little Women – Louisa May Alcott
54. Watership Down – Richard Adams
55. The Wizard of Oz – L. Frank Baum
56. A Bear Called Paddington – Michael Bond
57. The Book of Three – Lloyd Alexander
58. Tuck Everlasting – Natalie Babbitt
59. Tales of a Fourth-Grade Nothing – Judy Blume
60. The Incredible Journey – Sheila Burnford
61. Ramona the Pest – Beverly Cleary
62. The Chocolate War – Robert Cormier
63. Walk Two Moons – Sharon Creech
64. The Watsons Go to Birmingham: 1963 – Christopher Paul Curtis
65. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
66. Because of Winn-Dixie – Kate DiCamillo
67. A Girl Named Disaster – Nancy Farmer
68. Harriet the Spy – Louise Fitzhugh
69. Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key – Jack Gantos
70. M.C. Higgins, the Great – Virginia Hamilton
71. Redwall – Brian Jacques
72. The Phantom Tollbooth – Norton Juster
73. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler – E. L. Konigsburg
74. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe – C.S. Lewis
75. The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton
76. Across Five Aprils – Irene Hunt
77. Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
78. Flowers for Algernon – Daniel Keyes
79. The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien
80. Mary Poppins – P. L. Travers
81. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Mark Twain
82. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea – Jules Verne
83. Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
84. Little House on the Prairie – Laura Ingalls Wilder
85. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
86. The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
87. Little Women – Louisa May Alcott
88. Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
89. The Indian in the Cupboard – Lynne Reid Banks
90. Watership Down – Richard Adams
91. The Wizard of Oz – L. Frank Baum
92. Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
93. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë
94. Wuthering Heights – Emily Brontë
95. My Ántonia – Willa Cather
96. The Canterbury Tales – Geoffrey Chaucer
97. Murder on the Orient Express – Agatha Christie
98. Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
99. The Red Badge of Courage – Stephen Crane
100. Robinson Crusoe – Daniel Defoe
101. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
102. Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
103. A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
104. Silas Marner – George Eliot
105. Invisible Man – Ralph Ellison
106. The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
107. Johnny Tremain – Esther Forbes
108. The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank
109. The Miracle Worker – William Gibson
110. Old Yeller – Fred Gipson
111. Lord of the Flies – William Golding
112. The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
113. Summer of My German Soldier – Bette Greene
114. Death Be Not Proud – John Gunther
115. Roots – Alex Haley
116. Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
117. The Scarlet Letter – Nathaniel Hawthorne
118. A Farewell to Arms – Ernest Hemingway
119. For Whom the Bell Tolls – Ernest Hemingway
120. The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway
121. The Outsiders – S.E. Hinton
122. Across Five Aprils – Irene Hunt
123. Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
124. Flowers for Algernon – Daniel Keyes
125. The Jungle Book (Books I and II) – Rudyard Kipling
126. A Separate Peace – John Knowles
127. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
128. A Wrinkle in Time – Madeleine L’Engle
129. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe – C.S. Lewis
130. The Call of the Wild – Jack London
131. The Giver – Lois Lowry
132. Sarah, Plain and Tall – Patricia MacLachlan
133. Moby-Dick – Herman Melville
134. The Crucible – Arthur Miller
135. Death of a Salesman – Arthur Miller
136. Gone With the Wind – Margaret Mitchell
137. Anne of Green Gables – L. M. Montgomery
138. Island of the Blue Dolphins – Scott O’Dell
139. 1984 – George Orwell
140. Animal Farm – George Orwell
141. Cry, The Beloved Country – Alan Paton
142. A Day No Pigs Would Die – Robert Newton Peck
143. Where the Red Fern Grows – Wilson Rawls
144. All Quiet on the Western Front – Erich Maria Remarque
145. The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
146. The Catcher in the Rye – J. D. Salinger
147. Shane – Jack Schaefer
148. Romeo and Juliet – William Shakespeare
149. Pygmalion – George Bernard Shaw
150. Frankenstein – Mary Shelley
151. Antigone – Sophocles
152. Call It Courage – Armstrong Sperry
153. The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
154. Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
155. The Pearl – John Steinbeck
156. The Red Pony – John Steinbeck
157. Kidnapped – Robert Louis Stevenson
158. Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson
159. Gulliver’s Travels – Jonathan Swift
160. The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien
161. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Mark Twain
162. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
163. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – Jules Verne
164. The Color Purple – Alice Walker
165. Ethan Frome – Edith Wharton
166. Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
167. Little House on the Prairie – Laura Ingalls Wilder
168. Our Town – Thornton Wilder
169. Black Boy – Richard Wright
170. Native Son – Richard Wright
171. The Swiss Family Robinson – Johann David Wyss
172. The Pigman – Paul Zindel

 

Happy reading!

1 Archives of Disease in Childhood.

 

Read aloud by Media Angels: (available on Kindle)

 

How to Teach Your Kindergartner to Read

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Want to teach your kindergartner to read? Let’s look at fun ways you can introduce letters, letter sounds, picture books, first books, and a trip to the library to get them excited about reading.

Sponsored by Reading Eggs.

how to teach reading

Fun Ways to Teach Your Kindergartner to Read

One of the most rewarding experiences for parents is watching their child learn to read. Teaching your kindergartner to read can be an exciting journey filled with joy and bonding. To make this process enjoyable and effective, it’s essential to introduce letters, letter sounds, picture books, and first books in a way that sparks their curiosity and enthusiasm for reading. Let’s explore some fun and engaging ways to help your little one take their first steps into the world of reading.

1. Explore the World of Letters

To begin the reading journey, it’s important to introduce your kindergartner to the alphabet. Here are a few creative ways to do so:

  • a. Alphabet Art: Create an alphabet wall with colorful letters and pictures that correspond to each letter. Encourage your child to identify the letters and the associated sounds. This visual aid can serve as a great reference point.
  • b. Letter Sounds: Teach your child the sounds each letter makes through fun and interactive games. For example, you can play “I Spy” with objects that start with specific letters, like “I spy something that starts with the letter ‘B’ – it’s a banana!”
  • c. Begin Phonics: There are oodles of phonics programs available to homeschool families. We used Spell to Read and Write and had good success. Find one that works for your family and introduce the basic sounds as a game.

2. Dive into the World of Picture Books

Picture books are a wonderful way to engage your child’s imagination while introducing them to the joy of reading. Choose books with vivid illustrations and simple text that’s easy for your kindergartner to follow. Spend quality time reading together, making the experience enjoyable and interactive.

  • a. Ask Questions: While reading, ask questions about the story and the pictures. This encourages critical thinking and comprehension skills.
  • b. Act Out the Story: Let your child act out scenes from the story or even dress up as their favorite characters. This not only makes reading more fun but also helps with memory retention.
  • c. Grab Tracing Paper: Lay tracing paper over the pictures and let your child practice pencil control with different size media, such as crayings, pens, and colored pencils.

3. First Books for Beginners

Once your child becomes more comfortable with letters and picture books, it’s time to introduce them to the world of early reader books. These books are specifically designed for children who are learning to read. Choose books with simple, repetitive text and familiar words. A quick Amazon search or asking your librarian will get you in the right direction.

  • a. Read Together: Read these books together, and encourage your child to read aloud as well. Take turns reading pages or sentences to build their confidence.
  • b. Celebrate Progress: Celebrate small reading achievements with praise and rewards. Positive reinforcement can motivate your child to keep reading.

4. A Trip to the Library

A trip to the library can be an exciting adventure for your kindergartner. Most libraries have a dedicated section for children’s books, making it the perfect place to explore and choose books together.

  • a. Library Activities: Many libraries offer interactive programs like storytelling sessions, book clubs, and craft activities. Participating in these events can further fuel your child’s interest in reading.
  • b. Let Them Choose: Allow your child to select books that pique their interest. Whether it’s a book about dinosaurs, princesses, or outer space, the choice should be theirs. This personal connection to the material can be a powerful motivator.

Start Your Reading Adventure

Teaching your kindergartner to read is a magical journey that lays the foundation for a lifelong love of learning and literature. By introducing letters, letter sounds, picture books, and early reader books in a fun and engaging way, you can nurture their curiosity and excitement for reading. Remember to be patient, encouraging, and, most importantly, share in the joy of discovery as your child embarks on their reading adventure. Happy reading!

Check Out These Articles

Making Reading Easier | Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

making reading easierMaking Reading Easier by Dr. Jan Bedell

Sponsored by Reading Eggs

A prerequisite to reading using the phonics approach is a good auditory processing ability (auditory short-term memory).  If processing is not well developed, reading with phonics past three letter words can be next to impossible.  Don’t go buy another phonics program!  It isn’t the phonics program that is the issue, it is the processing that causes the difficulty.  You will learn what to do when phonics is not working and how to prepare the brain to be able to use phonics in the future.

When you work on this auditory processing skill and the others mentioned above, it can be instrumental in reducing the symptoms of dyslexia and other challenges.  Specific techniques to make reading easier are taught in this session. You will also understand how to improve comprehension.

Be sure to get the handout attached for information and discounts.

 – 17-MakingReadingEasier

 

  • Free auditory processing kit – here
  • Help for math facts – here
  • Brain boosting products – here

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Reading Fiction as a Christian – MBFLP 299

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

We’re both avid readers, and we’ve raised a whole nest of readers – our house is full of books — and not just the parents’! We’ve talked about some our personal favorites, but this episode we’re looking at whole genres of fiction. How should we, as Christians, approach fictional literature? Are there any kinds to beware of? What do we think about science fiction, fantasy, suspense, romance, mystery, or other sorts? And how do we sort the range of material in each group? If you’re a reader, or you have kids who are, check this out!

Passages we referenced:

King David and the prophet Nathan (2 Samuel 12:1-15)

Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:27-28)

The parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32)

To do evil is like sport to a fool, 
But a man of understanding has wisdom. (Proverbs 10:23)

“I, the LORD, search the heart, I test the mind, 
Even to give to every man according to his ways.” (Jeremiah 17:10)

“For the LORD does not see as man sees;for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart.”
(1 Samuel 16:7)

Episodes about discernment:

222 – Teaching Discernment

191 – Talking About the Movies

133 – Watching with Discernment 

and more! Browse the archives for more ideas and encouragement!

PLUS get this free resource – our downloadable Reading Pack!

 


This episode brought to you by

What Should We Read? How to Choose Good Books – FAH 24 – Replay

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

How to Choose Good Books | Flourish at Home Replay on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

There are millions of books available today. How on earth can you choose what’s best to read? In this episode, we’ll consider how to choose good books—both for yourself and for your children.

This is part 2 of a series on why, what, how, and when to read and why and how to build a home library.

Three Types of Books

To be able to choose good books, you need to understand the different types of books. Apart from the usual categories of fiction and nonfiction, there are three main types of books:

  1. Living Books – A living book is written by an author who loves the subject; it is challenging and inspiring. Focus on these!
  2. Reference Books – Atlas, dictionary, almanac, etc. These are useful to have on hand even if you also look things up online.
  3. Twaddle – This is Charlotte Mason’s term for dumbed-down, diluted, silly, easy-reading books with poor writing and sometimes tacked-on morals. Avoid these.

What Is a Good Book?

  1. In general, older books are likelier to be living books. New books are often politically correct and likelier to contain offensive material.
  2. Great books feature excellent writing and thought-provoking ideas. They often have an impact on other literature and culture.
  3. “Safe” does not equal “good.” All great literature involves conflict; otherwise there’s no plot. Literature can provide both positive examples to emulate and negative examples to avoid. Use books to teach your children discernment.
  4. It’s OK to read non-Christian authors (even ancient pagans). All truth is God’s truth.
  5. Include a mix of challenging books and easy books.
  6. Every person’s and family’s standards and tastes will differ. Choose good books in accordance with your own standards.

Guides to Help You Choose Good Books

Here are some of my favorite guides to help you choose good books:

For a longer list of my favorite books about how to choose good books, as well as my favorite books about homeschooling, visit my blog for booklovers at EclecticBibliophile.com. That will also put you on the list to be the first to find out about my new e-book about books, coming soon.

And if you wish you had more time to read, you’ll find encouragement and practical tips for time management in my book, Flourish.

Stay tuned for our next episode, when we’ll discuss HOW to read.

Other Resources Mentioned in This Episode

Realms of Gold: The Classics in Christian Perspective by Leland Ryken

A Thomas Jefferson Education by Oliver Van DeMille

 

NOTE: This post includes affiliate links. I will make a small commission if you purchase books through my links. Just think of this as an opportunity to help me build MY home library while you build YOURS!

Don’t Skip the Picture Books – MBFLP 294

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.


Do you have a precocious reader? We’ve had some! And when they’re being homeschooled – and around grownups all day – their vocabulary can be surprisingly rich. So should we move them on into the youth books, and skip over the picture books and beginning reader stuff? Or is there a purpose for enjoying the simple books together, even when your child could read more complex things?

This episode we’re talking with Hal’s mom, Norma Young, a retired elementary school librarian with nearly three decades of choosing quality children’s literature for young kids. There is indeed a good reason to enjoy the books we grew up with, and read them to our children just like they were read to us!

A resource we mentioned:

The Love of Reading – a downloadable collection of recommended reading lists for all ages, three helpful workshops on teaching reading, and discounts on other materials too!


This episode brought to you by Reading Eggs

Reading Eggs 4 Weeks Free

Cozy Mystery English Online

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #183, Cozy Mystery English Online, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

Cozy Mystery English Online

In “Cozy Mystery English Online,” Episode, #183, Laura Nolette & Meredith Curtis discuss Meredith’s Who Dun It high school English course online at True North Homeschooling Academy. Writing a novel in high school and creating Who Dun It high school English course has been a win-win for their teens. Who Dun It is fun in a co-op and online classes where students read and write cozy mysteries. This out-of-the-box high school English course is a blessing to many homeschool families who want to experience the adventure of clues, red herrings, plot twists, creating suspects, and leading their detective on a merry chase until the murderer is apprehended.

 

 

 


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Powerline Productions, Inc.

Bringing Homeschool Joy to Families Everywhere!

 


Show Notes

Our experience with novel writing in high school and eventually writing a who-dun-it.

Writing a Cozy Mystery

  • Cozy -no gore, clean, focus on solving a puzzle
  • Create detective, sidekick, friends, and suspects (characterization)
  • Create a scene-by-scene plot
  • Suspect’s Motives
  • Clues/Red Herrings
  • Setting/Tone/Mood/Christian Worldview
  • Plot Twists
  • Logic – Wrapping It Up

Who Dun It At Home

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce to Family
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud to Family
  • Get Input from Family
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss with Parents

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature and Writing High School Class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Dun It in Homeschool Co-op

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce in Class
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud
  • Peer Review Writing Club Style
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss

Who Dun It? Murder Mystery Literature & Composition Class at True North Homeschool Academy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Dun It Online

  • Read “Golden Age” Mystery Novels & Short Stories
  • Discuss Novels & Short Stories
  • Write a Short Story first semester
  • Write Novel second semester
  • Create Well-Rounded Characters/Introduce in Class
  • Read Sections of Short Story & Novel Aloud
  • Peer Review Writing Club Style
  • Watch Cozy Mysteries & Discuss

Who Dun It at True North Homeschool Academy

Literature & Composition: Who Dun It

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100 Homeschool Hacks by Meredith CurtisSign up for our updates and get your copy of 100 Homeschool Hacks FREE. Sign up here.

 

 

 

Literature Resources

Our curriculum works great at home; or in church, homeschool co-ops, and online classes, too! 😊

American Literature & Research British Literature & Writing High School Class Foundations of Western Literature by Meredith Curtis Communications 101:Essays and Speeches High School Class

 


Thank You to our Network Sponsor – CTC Math!

A Brand New Adventure Series for Kids

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #174, A Brand New Adventure Series for Kids with Special Guest Mike Curtis, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

A Brand New Adventure Series for Kids

with Special Guest Mike Curtis

In “A Brand New Adventure Series for Kids,” Episode, #174, Meredith Curtis interviews Mike Curtis, pastor and author of a brand-new series (and her husband!). He has written an amazing new series for children and teens: The Noland Kids Adventures. Mike shares his journey that led him to share his story. Learn all about the series and why your kids will love to read it!

 


Powerline Productions, Inc.

Powerline Productions, Inc.

Bringing Homeschool Joy to Families Everywhere!

 


Show Notes

Introduce Mike & Ministry https://www.powerlinecc.com/

Noland Kids Adventures  https://www.powerlineprod.com/books/the-noland-kids-adventure-series/

How It All Began

Rockford Park, Bedtime Stories to Children, Stories to Grandchildren

Covid-Strikes!

Needed to entertain kids at home listening to sermon

First Novel

The Key House

The Key House by Mike Curtis at Powerline Productions

Newly Inherited House 150-Year Old Secret, Clues to Hidden Treasure

Mystery/ Adventure, Hardy Boys meets The Goonies

Who is This Series Written For?

Christian Kids 10-14

Second Novel

Lost City of Light

The Lost City of Light by Mike Curtis at Powerline Productions, Inc.

Coming November 25th, 2022

How Can Listeners Get Book?

Amazon print or Kindle

Our website PowerlineProd.com

Reviews

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What Books are on the Horizon & When?

Legend of the Craftsman King  & Secret of Paradise Cove

The Legend of the Craftsman King by Mike Curtis at Powerline Productions, Inc.    The Secret of Paradise Cove by Mike Curtis at Powerline Productions, Inc.

 

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100 Homeschool Hacks by Meredith CurtisSign up for our updates and get your copy of 100 Homeschool Hacks FREE. Sign up here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Key House

The Key House by Mike Curtis at Powerline Productions

HUGE Black Friday/ Cyber Monday Sale!

Travel God's World God Bless the USA Exploring States & Territories by Meredith Curtis at Powerline Productions Travel God's World God Bless the USA Cookbook by Meredith Curtis and Laura Nolette at Powerline Productions God Bless the USA State Capitals & Abbreviations by Meredith Curtis at Powerline Productions, Inc. Travel God's World God Bless the USA State Flags & Seals by Meredith Curtis at Powerline Productions

 


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7 Classic Books Every Homeschool Mom Should Read

A Production of the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network.

Finish Well Homeschool Podcast, Podcast #169, 7 Classic Books Every Homeschool Mom Should Read, with Meredith Curtis on the Ultimate Homeschool Podcast Network

7 Classic Books Every Homeschool Mom Should Read

In “7 Classic Books Every Homeschool Mom Should Read,” Episode, #169, Meredith Curtis shares her favorites with you – books that have inspired, equipped, and encouraged her. These books will change your life and your perspective. Grab a cup of tea or mug of coffee and learn about some classic books that you will want to read and reread again.

 


Time for Back-to-School with PowerlineProd.com

 

Powerline Productions, Inc.

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Show Notes

The bookcase outside my door.

Books impact our lives. Some of my books are like special friends who have spoken into my life and brought forth something new.

L’Abri by Edith Schaeffer

Frances & Edith Schaeffer’s ministry in Switzerland.

Focus on creating a nurturing environment and ministering in and from the home.

For Better or Best by Gary Smalley

As a young couple, we attended this author’s conference and had our first introduction to the vast difference in the way men and women think. Also how different their needs are.

He also wrote If Only He Knew.

Shepherding a Child’s Heart by Tedd Tripp

My favorite book on parenting. It really shows how to parent by imitating Jesus as a shepherd of our children’s hearts.

Hidden Art of Homemaking by Edith Schaeffer

I love art and beauty and classic books. Edith opened my eyes to the true art involved in creating a home from interior decorating to fostering integration of ages, I love this book!

Creative Counterpart by Linda Dillow

A great book on how to be a wife from the relational to the practical including organization.

The Christian Family by Larry Christenson

Every Christian should read this book on the the how, what, and why of God’s design of the Christian family. Covers roles and responsibilities, including the family’s Saviour – Jesus and parent’s role in the spiritual nurture of their children.

Spirit of Loveliness by Emilie Barnes

Lovely inside and out, Emilie reminds us to add beauty in our world to fee our soul. I love all her books but this is my favorite!

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100 Homeschool Hacks by Meredith CurtisSign up for our updates and get your copy of 100 Homeschool Hacks FREE. Sign up here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources

All our curriculum is built around living books 😊

Newspaper Reporting by Meredith Curtis Travel God's World Geography by Meredith Curtis British Literature & Writing High School Class HIS Story of the 20th Century by Meredith Curtis

 


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