LCP 07 Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage your Reluctant Reader

What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study

LCP Ep 4: What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study

 

Join Katie at the Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study #homeschool #homeschooling #language arts #elementary school

How are you going to homeschool Language Arts with your elementary aged children? Does the idea of teaching your child to read or write stress you out? Do you wonder if  you are teaching everything you need to during the elementary school years for what is called “Language Arts”? And how are you going to cover everything plus other subjects during the day?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she discusses what skills and concepts you should include in your Language Arts study during the elementary school years. Listen for practical tips and suggested curriculum and resources to help you and your learners use your time efficiently, effectively, and economically in teaching and learning Language Arts in your homeschool. She will also give you fun learning ideas to address learners in your home with different learning styles.

The Five Areas of Language Arts you should include in the Elementary School Years

What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study  (Printable for you to download)

Reading

Use a Phonics based program or curriculum that starts with letters and moves to vowel sounds and vowel combinations, then moves to consonant blends. These programs will also include when to introduce specific sight words.

Use a multisensory approach to be able to address all learning styles and multiple learners in your family. At early ages, it may be difficult to determine your child’s learning style. Not only use different ways to look at words and hear the sounds for your visual and auditory learners, but address your kinesthetic learners with assorted hands-on activities.d

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Reading

Foundations – Logic of English (K-1)

Hooked on Phonics (K-2)

Bob Books – Early Readers to Supplement your programs

Explode the Code (K-4)

Phonics Pathways (K-2)

McRuffy Language Arts (K-4)

All About Reading (K-4)

Reading for Grades 3-4 – After Phonics and Developing Fluency

After your child is ready to move on from learning to read to reading larger chunks of material and has begun to develop fluency, you will want to introduce other reading skills such as comprehension and higher order thinking skill questions and other skills.

These skills include –

  • recalling detail
  • making inferences and predictions
  • using context clues
  • identifying main ideas
  • learning the elements of a story – plot, conflict, setting, characters, point of view, theme
  • literary devices and writing techniques such as similes and metaphors
  • Introduce the study of vocabulary and vocabulary skills

We used a combination of novels and study guides; an anthology for other forms of writing such as essays, speeches, poetry, short stories, and plays; and reading novels or “living books” aloud together that were tied to our history or social studies.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Reading for Grades 3-4

Bob Jones University – Book Links

Total Language Plus 

Progeny Press

Mosdos Press Literature Anthologies

Handwriting

Along with learning to identify and make the sounds of letters and able to read simple words, you will want to eventually include handwriting those letters and words. Before you begin handwriting, you will want to make sure your learner has the fine motor skills to hold the pencil and make the formation of the letters.

You can develop fine motor skills by using safety scissors and tracing lines and assorted shapes with a pencil. You can also practice using the pincers with tweezers or play (larger-size) tweezers to pick up objects including pony beads and doing sorting activities.

Start with cursive or D’Nealian cursive instead of manuscript or printing. This is easier for early writers because their hands and arms do not leave the paper and it is a more continuous and smooth motion. They do not have to worry about picking up the pencil and where to place it to continue to draw each letter.

You can make your own handwriting worksheets to go along with your Phonics program and spelling lists.

https://www.handwritingworksheets.com/

Spelling

Spelling as a subject should be closely related to what your child is learning or has learned with their Phonics program. If you tie the learning of word families from the Phonics program to handwriting and spelling with the same word lists, you have taken three parts of your Language Arts programs and have effectively and efficiently tied them together with meaningful learning.

Use a program that is based on Phonics and word families in the same word lists. This makes the words and lessons more meaningful and easier to master.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Spelling

Building Spelling Skills by Christian Liberty Press

All About Spelling

Vocabulary – Grades 3-4

Use the vocabulary words from the novels and anthology you are reading. Separate vocabulary workbooks can be dry and boring and not very effective. Using vocabulary from the context of novels and reading from an anthology give the vocabulary words meaning and a foundation for your learners to understand and remember those words. I have found this a more effective and better use of learning time.

Writing and Composition

We began writing sentences when my littles were learning to read. I had them draw a picture from something we read aloud and they would dictate to me a sentence telling me what that picture was about. I would write it down as they said it so they would see the connection between their words and my writing.

We moved on from there to continuing our read aloud time and we used a Charlotte Mason technique of “narration” where my children would retell a chapter of something we just read or a short story like a fable, folktale, or fairytale. This required them to organize their thoughts in their heads before they retold the story and while they were telling me the story. These are important skills a writer should have before they write their thoughts on paper.

This retelling is easier to use in starting to write something on paper instead of having to come up with their own story and content. They can concentrate on writing a summary of what they have heard. I would have my little guys draw a scene from what we read and tell me a sentence about that picture. I would then have them write a sentence, one word at a time, from what they just told me. Any misspelled words (usually two at a time) would then become part of that week’s spelling list. Soon my guys would be writing two sentences and by the end of the year an entire page of sentences using this retelling technique.

We used several resources to build on adding details to these sentences and then moved onto the proper paragraph format.

Suggested Homeschool Language Arts Curriculum – Writing and Composition

Write a Super Sentence by Evan Moor

Paragraph Writing by Evan Moor

Writing Fabulous Sentences and Paragraphs

Here is a bundle of notebooking pages that we used for our written narration that I mentioned in the podcast to develop our writing skills. There is a set for different subject areas that we used to either make our own books or put into a 3 ring binder to put together a notebook of our writing and what we learned in that subject that year.

Make Your Own ABC Book Notebooking Pages Bundle Set

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share that your family has used in your Language Arts or any of these ideas from this podcast you found helpful! I would love to hear from you! Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for July’s topic when we discuss what to include in your study of language arts in your homeschool for your middle and high school learners!

Make sure you subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast at iTunes so you don’t miss an episode or by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page!

Join Katie at the Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about What to Include in your Elementary Language Arts Study #homeschool #homeschooling #language arts #elementary school

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage.


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Tips for Actively Reading Any Piece of Literature

actively readingIt’s easy to get distracted when reading, especially in today’s digital society where something is always beeping, buzzing, or dinging. Our attentions are pulled in a million different directions. We could all use a little help when it comes to focusing on a single task. In this blog post, I’ll be discussing some tips on something we do every day: reading! And not just any type of reading, but actively reading.

Just like a great athlete must undergo deep practice to become skilled at his or her game, an expert reader must practice good habits when it comes to reading. Actively reading is akin to this type of deep practice.

Here are some podcasts with great literature suggestions.

Best Summer Reading

Helping Literal Thinkers with Literature Analysis

Literature In Your Homeschool

Tip #1: Set Yourself Up for Success

When I am actively reading something, I have pens, pencils, markers, highlighters, and an array of colored pencils by my side — these are my tools for success.

For example, if I actively read a novel, there are few pages that don’t have some underlined or circled word, a question scribbled in the margin, or a highlighted phrase. Come up with a process that works for you and find the tools that best suit it.

Tip #2: Ask Questions

An inquiring mind learns. In order for true knowledge acquisition to occur during an actively reading session, the reader must ask themselves questions to stay engaged with the literature.

Below, I have shared a series of questions that are useful for readers starting to actively read. My high school freshman English teacher used them to guide our literary learning throughout the year. They proved to be a great base for engaging with different texts and served me well after. These questions can be most readily applied to novels and poetry; however, they can be adapted to really any piece of literature. The questions are broken up into the following sections: characters, setting, plot, symbols and other devices, point of view, themes, irony, and newly imagined.

CHARACTER
• Who is the protagonist and who or what is the antagonist?
• What words come to mind when you think about the protagonist or the antagonist?
• How is he, she, or it characterized?
• What motivates this character’s actions?
• What is memorable about the character?
• Is the author’s depiction of the character the same throughout the entire text?
• Are there any surprises? If so what are they?

SETTING
• Where does the story take place? Is the setting: geographical, physical, magical, socio-economic, chronological?
• Locate and specify the various types of setting. What does such specific setting contribute to the overall effect of the story (thematically or in terms of character)?
• When the setting changes where does it change to and how does the change impact the story?

PLOT
• Briefly, what is going on?
• What structure does the story follow (e.g. Freytag)?
• Where in the story are the main points?
• What are the conflicts? Where in the story are they?
• Are the conflicts internal or external? Are they physical, intellectual, societal, moral, or emotional?
• Is the main conflict between sharply differentiated entities (e.g. good versus evil), or is it more subtle and complex?
• Does the plot have unity? Are all the episodes relevant to the total meaning or effect of the story?
• Is the ending happy, unhappy, or indeterminate? Is it fairly achieved?

SYMBOLS AND OTHER DEVICES
• Does the story make use of symbols?
• What kind does the author use (names, objects, actions)?
• What does each symbol mean?
• Does the symbol carry or merely reinforce the meaning of the story?
• What other devices does the author use (e.g. imagery, metaphor, personification, pathos, allusions, aphorisms)? How are they used? What meaning does their use lend to the story?

POINT OF VIEW
• What point of view does the story use?
• Is it consistent in its use of this point of view?
• If shifts in point of view are made are they justified?
• If the point of view is that of one of the characters does that character have any limitations that affect her/his interpretation of events or persons?

THEME
• Does the story have a theme?
• What is it? Is it implicit or explicit?
• Does the theme reinforce or oppose popular notions of life?
• Does it furnish a new insight or refresh or deepen an old one?
• Remember, a theme is an opinion rather like a thesis statement not simply a topic.

IRONY
• Does the story anywhere utilize irony? If so what kind and how? What functions do the ironies serve?

NEWLY IMAGINED
• Compared to other things you have read is there something new, unique, or different about the way the author presents this story or poem?

Special Replay: The Best Way to Teach Reading

best way to teach readingThe almost militant battle of how to best teach reading has been waged over the last 150+ years with proponents from both sides being adamant about their recommendations.  As the reading curriculum pendulum has swung back and forth from phonics to sight to phonics the controversy roars on with little attention given to anything except technique. This narrow view of reading has resulted in millions of individuals being diagnosed with dyslexia and other reading and language delays.

With the introduction of learning styles even more reading techniques abound.  Phonics is an auditory approach to reading. One must hold each sound in auditory short-term memory long enough to get the word “sounded out”. If the child’s auditory short-term memory (processing) is low, phonics doesn’t work well, and the parents typically finds themselves moving from one phonics program to the next.  This is often the case in the home school community because phonics is viewed as “THE” best way to teach reading.  Don’t get me wrong; I love phonics and it is a terrific way to teach reading IF the child has good auditory processing. If not, there is frustration, tears and feelings of low self-esteem.

A visual learner might pick up sight words easily but struggle with phonics because of the learner’s visual bend.  For the tactile learner, reading is a real challenge as it is time consuming and inefficient to create each word you need to learn out of pipe cleaners or the like.

In this episode, the Brain Coach will give you tips on what functions must be working well in the brain for reading to take place as she reveals the best way to teach reading.

 

Don’t miss the handout attached here with links to pertinent information and discounts.

Visit our sponsor –LittleGiantSteps.com

College Transition from Roadschool

 

College transition from high school is on the table in episode #144 that comes to you live from the Roadschool Moms team on the road. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  broadcasts from the a sweltering location that recorded 113 degree temperatures earlier in the day in southern Utah. Across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher chimes in from the central Missouri along Route 66. The ORT dynamic duo are joined tonight by veteran roadschooling mom, Tara Weed who recently graduated her son from high school and beamed with pride as he went off to college without a hitch!

The big transition. As homeschoolers, we face what seems like a constant bombarding of questions regarding the success of our roadschoolers pending success, or lack thereof. Do they have friends? Are they get the proper “socialization?” Do they measure up to public school kids? In an answer, we really don’t know. Shockingly, the same is true of our public school mamas. When it comes down to it, only you know what’s best for your family. Building the confidence in yourself as a roadschool mom and giving your roadschoolers the tools to build their foundation for the same is critical to the layers of education built during these years. This episode brings specific examples and loads of encouragement to help navigate the waters from roadschool to college.
Throughout the podcast, Tara speaks about her son Brennan’s recent experience, of adjusting to college life while joining the National Guard to pay for it. She reflects back on their decision to unschool their boys and the benefits that have came from that positive experience over the years. Tara admits that at one point, her son wasn’t sure college was the next step in his education; however, this roadschool mom kept the roadschool journey on a road that could easily turn in any direction.
Many recommendations come out of this positively powerhouse packed episode to recognize the value of a roadschooling lifestyle. Tara reflects on how her son prepared for the SAT (through Khan Academy.) She reveals that this online resource bridged the gap in the areas where her roadschooler needed help (specifically in math.) She further revealed that taking a few classes at a community college that aligned with their travels also helped prepare her son for the steps necessary to successfully enroll in a college of his choice. Tara advises roadschool moms to encourage their homeschooler to picture himself in the college or university where he sees himself. Wherever that is, do the research to market your roadschooler to that institution. Make that school want your roadschooler as much as she wants to be admitted there. Much of Tara’s advise is common sense; however, her genuine reflection is a breath of fresh air in this daunting subject. For more great tips on transitioning your high schoolers to college, hit the replay below to hear more including Tara’s absolute must have books Guerilla Learning and Teenage Liberation Handbook.

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

Roadschool Moms:  Season 11

Discovering Dyslexia and Reading Issues in Your Child

Discovering Dyslexia and Reading Issues in Your ChildRichele and Lindsey both have dyslexic children and understand how hard it is to see your child struggle through reading lessons. Join them as they discuss how they discovered their children had dyslexia and the steps they took to help. Their hope is that they can help you navigate troubled reading waters and sail into victory!

Website:  http://talkingmom2mom.com

 

Community on the Road: The Great American Eclipse

Episode #142 comes to you live from on the road and the Roadschool Moms team. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  broadcasts from the Bend, Oregon, site of SolarFest 2017. Across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher sits this one out from Carbondale, Illinois. Kimberly is joined by a  group of roadschool moms with her on-site at FtF hangout geared for The Great American Eclipse 2017.

This episode is a chatfest packed with great information for fulltime, RVing families looking for resources to connect with other like-minded families on the road. Events such as the eclipse bring together families on one location to encourage and support one another in this community.

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

The Official Sponsor for Season 10 of Roadschool Moms

Kindergarten Ready or Not

 

Kindergarten ready or not? Episode #140 comes to you live from on the road to Oregon well as Illinois. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  recaps her roadschool week as she gets ready to head to Oregon. From across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher looks back on their roadschool week in the Land of Lincoln.

Listeners hear a few words from the Season 10 series sponsor,  Time4Learning. The comprehensive K-12 online curriculum is a favorite from the Roadschool Moms Approved resources. Both KT and MB use T4L in their own rolling homeschools. The coupon code “roadschooler” is shared for those who want to test drive a trial run of the online resource.

There is not just one indicator of whether your 4, 5 or 6 year old sunshine is ready for official kindergarten or not. And guess what the best test you can give him or her to find out? You guessed it:  none. Try not to base the start of your littles entire formal education on one pivotal circumstance. Instead, consider these six areas to evaluate:
Is he eager to explore and discover new things? Does she ask questions and have an enthusiasm for learning? Does he have the drive to keep on a task even when it is difficult? If the answer to those questions are yes, then you probably have a child that is ready for the kindergarten learning adventure.
Does he have the desire to take responsibility for his actions, for his personal belongings? Can she follow a series of two or three directions? If he possesses self-motivation and a persistence to find out answers on his own, you probably have a kindergarten-ready kiddo.
Another good indicator if your little is ready for kindergarten is the level of communication skills. As in, can she communicate her wants and needs? Has she figured out how to express her feelings or at least recognize the difference in how she feels vs. others around her? This is a sign that language skills are growing and guidance is needed here to keep heading in the right direction.
This next one is a hard one because it is about listening. There’s not many 5 year olds that probably don’t interrupt at some point or another. But for the most part, a kindergarten ready kiddo can sit and listen to a story without interrupting. He can follow simple directions because he has honed in on his listening skills and can process that in his little brain.
Now let’s talk about a few easy things to spot in kindergardten readiness (or not!) And that is fine motor skills. If your child is comfortable writing with a pencil, penning their own name, and using scissors independently, then kindergarten activities will be a snap. They are ready for this next step.
The final thing easily identified is awareness for the alphabet and numbers. Littles that are ready for kindergarten can sing the alphabet song, count to 10, and recognize at least numbers 1 through 5 as well as a majority of the alphabet. Sure at this age, b’s and d’s are mixed up. The letter ‘p’ or the number ‘3’ might be backwards, but that’s where kindergarten curriculum can help strengthen these areas and build their confidence. The next step is learning phonics and when it clicks, you’ll have an emerging reader. This is an area that comes together differently for each and every child.

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

The Official Sponsor for Season 10 of Roadschool Moms

Wrap Up a Successful Roadschool Year

 

Wrapping up a roadschool year is a snap with these tips from the Roadschool Moms team. Episode #139 comes to you live from the the State of Washington as well as southern Indiana. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families,  recaps her roadschool week from the Evergreen State. From across the country, Mary Beth Goff, the Road Trip Teacher looks back on their roadschool week in the Hoosier State.

Listeners hear a few words from the Season 10 series sponsor,  Time4Learning. The comprehensive K-12 online curriculum is a favorite from the Roadschool Moms Approved resources. Both KT and MB use T4L in their own rolling homeschools. The coupon code “roadschooler” is shared for those who want to test drive a trial run of the online resource.

This special season ending episode takes a look back at the 12-episode journey to plan a successful roadschool year.

Summer Sun & Roadschool Fun: Sunglasses are on and homeschool calendars out for this episode. Listen to seven sweet suggestions for planning summer learning adventures.
Vision for a Successful Roadschool Year: Roadschool Mom Mary Jane Williams joins MB to talk about having a VISION for your homeschool plans. MB reminds listeners that “Comparison is a thief” and every family’s goals are different. Listen to the seven questions to ask yourself when formulating a homeschool vision.
Choosing Roadschool Curriculum:  KT and MB take apart their roadschool tool box and talk about the different ways to build a roadschool curriculum.
Record Keeping Made Easy:  Dave from Homeschool Tracker joins this special episode with all the expert advice on keeping track of your homeschool records. KT reminds listeners  “The best system is the one you will use!”
 
Roadschool Moms at FPEA:  The RSM team broadcasts live from the FPEA Convention in Orlando, Florida, from the beautiful Gaylord Palms Hotel. Special guest, Andrew Pudewa joins the show with rich and useful information needed to train your homeschoolers up to be effective writers.
Morning Time by Nature:  A favorite past guest, Holly Giles from The Giles Frontier, joins the show to share insight on using Morning Time for the next roadschool year. The homeschooling trio share their tips and advice on using nature for easy Morning Time plans.
Independent Learners by Nature or by Design:  A podcast filled with specific examples for training your kids to be independent learners by looking at the characteristics in your kiddos:  self-motivation, curiosity, persistence, critical thinking, responsibility.
Growing Successful Readers: Stephanie Simpson, a teamleader for Usborne Books joins the Roadschool Moms team to share top tips for growing successful readers in your rolling homeschool. Lots of great information is broken down into nuggets for emerging readers as well as early, fluent & expert readers.
Experience America the Beautiful:  American history & geography are front & center for this episode.  An up close interview with Charlene Notgrass, the creator of the fabulous curriculum, is the feature for this week. Textbook, maps, timelines, and lesson plans! It’s U.S. History for your middle or high schoolers – Ready, set, go!
National Holidays as Roadschool Opportunities:  An episode that reflects on how to use your surroundings, the time of year, and national holidays to feed your roadschoolers fresh, new information. Take out the calendar, there’s never a shortage of ways to celebrate the day.
Building a Strong Math Foundation:  Dennis “Mr D!” DiNola has all the facts about math. He reminds listeners to keep kids learning the math language.  His best message is “doing math can be like eating vegetables, you might not necessarily like it but you CAN learn to appreciate it.”
Hands-on Science:  Luke Gilkerson, Intoxicated on Life, shares information about his Experience Astronomy curriculum. Luke shares his best advice “to teach roadschoolers how to think” by the process of observing, testing hypothesis, finding a conclusion. He encourages roadschool moms everywhere that science is all around us and is easy to work into a roadschool schedule.
Icing Your Roadschool Cake:  Tricia Hodges gives great tips on letting your roadschoolers be creative. Chalk pastel art projects are so easy and fun to use anywhere, anytime. This episode reveals three things you can easily access to get started today.
The Roadschool Moms breaks down seven steps to wrap up a successful roadschool year:
  1. Celebrate the year
  2. Review accomplishments
  3. Create a portfolio
  4. Analyze interests
  5. Plan summer learning adventures
  6. Record transcripts
  7. Honor family traditions
“That’s a WRAP”

Looking for a roadmap for your next learning adventure? Scroll through the RSM library on iTunes to find more than 130 podcast replays.

Homeschool enrollment is on the rise. More and more families are moving into a home on wheels. As a result, the Roadschool Moms record this broadcast to present resources that meet the challenges of today’s roadschooler. Kimberly Travaglino, co-founder of Fulltime Families, and Mary Beth Goff, the creator of Road Trip Teacher, team up every week to offer listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time across America’s backyard.

The Official Sponsor for Season 10 of Roadschool Moms

On the Importance of Reading Aloud to Your Children

Join Lindsey as she discusses the importance of reading aloud and gives some encouragement and ideas for the mom who may not be delighted at the idea of reading aloud to her children.Reading aloud to your children has a multitude of benefits for your family. Join Lindsey as she discusses the importance of reading aloud and gives some encouragement and ideas for the mom who may not be delighted at the idea of reading aloud to her children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helpful Links:

Making Narration FUN! A Free Printable Download: https://www.talkingmom2mom.com/2017/03/making-narration-fun.html

How to Read Slowly, by James Sire: http://amzn.to/2wcmCTb

Read Aloud Revival: Reading Aloud to Older Kids:  https://amongstlovelythings.com/1/

Nurturing Competent Communicators by Andrew Pudewa: http://iew.com/help-support/resources/mp3-resources/nurturing-competent-communicators

Logic of English: https://www.logicofenglish.com/

 

Talking Mom2Mom Links:

Talking Mom2Mom

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