October Ultimate Checklists Freebie

Ahhh… October!  October has arrived, and it brings thoughts of fall and harvest time. It often is the beginning of cool weather and a busy season, so take a deep breath and start preparing early! Get those checklists printed off, which will streamline planning. This approach will allow you to survive and flourish in this hectic time. Look at your schedule. Are you going to a harvest party, or are you going to plan one? How about crafts and activities?

Let’s get planning and let the ideas flow in an orderly fashion!

The October Ultimate Checklist can give you the direction and insight you need. Find out how to get a copy of the October checklist freebie below.

 

October checklist freebie

Faith, Friends, and Family

What a great month to pause and spend your planning time around your faith, family, and friends. Homeschooling is usually well underway, giving you time to interject some fun!

As you flip through the planner, highlight activities you know your family will love.

Planning, when done with prayerful seeking, is more than just a printable; it’s a way to keep your family time on track while settling into your homeschool flow.

Truly, the printable is a tool you use, but the real work in planning is done before you print the first page of the printable through prayer.

Spend some time praying for direction! And print the Bible verse graphics and hang them in a place to encourage you.

What is in the October Checklist Freebie?

This month’s checklist has everything you need to enjoy the fall season.

October is a fantastic time to focus on our small or large community and is filled with exciting opportunities to enjoy nature, family, and friends. There are also many holidays to note and fun field trip ideas. So, don’t forget to plan your field trips; winter will be here, and we’ll be hearthside more than outside!

  • Checklists Guide – This is a breakdown of how to use the lists for the month, with suggestions to help you get started.
  • Objectives Worksheet
  • Weekly Planning Worksheet
  • Blank Printable October Calendar
  • Four square planners: Faith, Kids, School, and Household
  • Evaluation Weekly Worksheets
  • Motivational Posters and Scripture Posters
  • Printable October Checklist
  • Fun Things to do in September Printable
  • October Holidays Printable Sheet
  • Field Trip Planning
  • Reading Log
  • Organization Checklist
  • Chore Schedule Blank Sheet
  • Quarterly Planning
  • School Planning Sheets
  • Sample School Schedules to Follow
  • Homeschool Weekly Planning Sheets
  • Meal Planning Helps and Suggestions

Download the monthly checklist sent out in each weekly ezine; these are available to subscribers only.

The planner access information is always located at the bottom of each email. Sign up for the freebie so you don’t miss it.

You can sign up HERE as a subscriber if you are not signed up.

 

September Ultimate Checklists Freebie

September is here, and that means back-to-homeschool is in full swing. The curriculum has been purchased and planned. We’ve moved from the anything-goes schedules and summer vacations of August and Summer to settled into the approach of autumn.  This is a perfect time to pause and reflect on the rhythm of our homes and homeschools. Before you blink, the holiday season will be here. How do we make the most of those introductory months of our homeschool? The September Ultimate Checklist can give you the direction and insight you need.

 

Prayer, Planning, and Pause in Your Home

All good planning begins with prayer. Take the time to seek the Lord for your homeschool. Pray for each of your children, your spouse, and your homeschooling year.

As you pray, note anything the Lord lays on your heart, then pause.

Pausing before planning, especially when you’ve taken the time to pray, allows you to catch your breath. What’s working? Where is the stress coming from? What are our homeschool goals for this year?  Where can we improve? What can we let go of? How is my family? Take the time to reflect and record what you’ve learned.

Planning, when done with prayerful seeking, is more than just a printable; it’s a set of rails to set your homeschool success upon. Truly, the printable is a tool you to use, but the real work in planning is done before you print the first page of the printable.

What is in the September Checklist Freebie?

This month’s checklist has everything you need to wind down summer and enjoy the fall season.

September is the perfect time to pray, reflect, and organize your home and homeschool. Additionally, there are many creative holidays to note and fun field trip ideas, too. So, don’t forget to plan your field trips; winter will be here, and we’ll be hearthside more than outside!

  • Checklists Guide – This is a breakdown of how to use the lists for the month, with suggestions to help you get started.
  • Objectives Worksheet
  • Weekly Planning Worksheet
  • Blank Printable September Calendar
  • Four square planners: Faith, Kids, School, and Household
  • Evaluation Weekly Worksheets
  • Motivational Posters and Scripture Posters
  • Printable September Checklist
  • Fun Things to do in September Printable
  • September Holidays Printable Sheet
  • Field Trip Planning
  • Tips for School Pictures
  • First Day of Fall Party Guide
  • Reading Log
  • Organization Checklist
  • Chore Schedule Blank Sheet
  • Quarterly Planning
  • School Planning Sheets
  • Sample School Schedules to Follow
  • Homeschool Weekly Planning Sheets
  • Meal Planning Helps and Suggestions

Download the monthly checklist sent out in each weekly ezine; these are available to subscribers only.

The planner access information is always located at the bottom of each email. Make sure you are signed up so you don’t miss it.

You can sign up HERE as a subscriber if you are not signed up.

September Ultimate checklists

 

How to Plan for Homeschool Sanity

Are you in the process of planning for the new school year? If so, you’re likely seeking homeschool sanity. You want to achieve your goals and enjoy homeschooling, too. But is that even possible?

After homeschool planning for more than 20 years, I can say that it IS possible with a few tweaks to the way we normally plan.

Planning for Homeschool Sanity

A traditional approach to homeschool planning is to assign dates to lessons and activities for each student. In addition, we may create a schedule or routine and plan where our books and materials will be stored.

This type of planning is important but is unlikely to help you have a happy, successful homeschool on its own. Instead,

The first step in planning is to ask yourself what got in the way of your homeschool sanity last year.

If you’re homeschooling for the first time, you can still do this.

Answer these questions:

  • What contributed to stress for you and your family last year?
  • How could you have avoided that stress?
  • What strategies would have made that stress easier to manage?

I’m answering these questions, too. The death of my sister-in-law last fall was a major stressor. While we had no control over when she passed, we could have talked a lot more about what we would do when she needed care. After an extremely stressful time of interacting with difficult people who knew my sister-in-law, I realized that most of the stress was the result of how I thought about the situation. I was awfulizing mentally, saying things to myself like “This is a nightmare” and “I can’t take anymore.” If I had reminded myself that God was with me and that I had the support of my husband and other family members, I could have spared myself a lot of suffering.

My example doesn’t have much to do with homeschooling. Your answers may not either. But life stress impacts our homeschooling.

Answers I may have given in our earlier homeschool years include:

  • searching for kids’ shoes as we’re about to leave the house
  • not knowing how to handle kids’ squabbles
  • having too many church commitments

The second step in planning for homeschool sanity is to practice prevention.

The best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. We look to what went wrong in the previous year so we can be proactive in planning for this year.

Ask yourself what you can do to prevent similar stress or to cope with it more effectively.

Because I overreacted to difficult people in the past year, I can expect that to be a problem this year, too. Besides spending more time increasing my trust in God, I can ask friends and family to help me reframe my thoughts when I talk about difficult people.

  • With missing shoes, I could have trained the kids to take them off in a specific place or to set them out before bed.
  • With sibling rivalry, I could have planned to have focused discussions with the kids, rather than looking for a quick fix.
  • With church commitments, I could have limited them to one ongoing role and one short-term role at a time.

The third step in planning is to choose one leveraged weekly goal.

A major contributor to stress is trying to achieve multiple goals at the same time. When we want to be good at it all, chances are that we won’t be good at anything.

There is nothing wrong with having a goal for the homeschool year–goals like developing a love of learning, building stronger relationships, or establishing organizing habits. These are great options to consider.

But more often than not, we have unwritten goals of finishing all our curriculum (even the multiple options per subject); inspiring the kids to be pursue multiple passions independently; making healthy, homemade meals every night; reading 50 classics aloud with the family; going on lots of field trips; getting in shape as a family; and starting a business. We think somehow the time will magically expand to allow us to accomplish all these things. But, of course, it doesn’t. We are disappointed and feel like failures until the next year when we commit to trying harder.

The way to stop this stress cycle is to plan one goal a week that will result in an improvement in your life and homeschool. Some of these goals will be so effective that you’ll continue them. These are some ideas that I have used as weekly goals:

  • Exercise alone or with others
  • Plan meals for the week or have your kids plan them
  • Arrange to have grocery shopping done for you or have groceries delivered
  • Hire a mother’s helper for a day this week
  • Get together for homeschool activities with another family
  • Start your homeschool day later in the morning
  • Read aloud or watch educational videos during family time, freeing up time during the day
  • Train one of your kids to help you in your business or volunteer work
  • Sign up for service activities as a family
  • Teach a subject to multiple students to save time or increase motivation
  • Trade teaching responsibilities with a friend
  • Go to bed early so you can personal time the next morning
  • Plan time to connect with your spouse in the morning or evening

Doing any of these activities is likely to have a positive impact on other areas of your life or homeschool. See my book The Organized Homeschool Life for even more ideas and the associated planner for a way to regularly plan weekly goals.

Conclusion

If you ask yourself what created stress for you last year, what can you do to prevent or cope with stress this year, and what weekly goal will result in an improvement in your life this week, you’ll have a plan for homeschool sanity that is likely to succeed this year.

August Ultimate Checklists Freebie

August is upon us and there is one more month left of summer. This is the last month of summer break for many families. Some families wait until September to start school, while others may follow their local school schedule and start in just a couple of weeks.

August Ultimate Lists Freebie

Regardless of when you begin school, August is a very big month of preparations and a great time to get organized. Summer goes by so fast and before you know it, it will be time to start school. Will you be ready?

Planning for the rest of the summer:

Our family takes a big “not back to school” vacation at the end of August and we begin school on Labor Day. That means that this month is a big month of planning our family vacation and making sure that everything is ready to begin school when we get back.

Checklists are a great way to help keep your family on track with everything that you want to finish doing over the summer. They also will help you plan and keep track of everything that you need to get done before school begins. Make sure to take time to pick one thing to challenge yourself on this new school year. Something that you want to focus on for personal growth or for goals for your family.

Finishing out the summer with a bang, and planning out the new school year is an exciting time of new beginnings for your entire family.

What is in the August Checklist Freebie?

This month’s checklist has everything you need to finish out your summer. The planning and organization sheets will be a huge help to get your family ready for a new school year. Take the time to reflect on what changes you would like to see for your family this year and use our checklists to help you implement them.

You will love thinking about the new school year and all the fun things you can do. There are lots of creative and fun field trip ideas too, so don’t forget to get your field trips planned out. Planning field trips along with whatever subjects you are learning in your homeschool is a great way to keep your kids engaged. Field trips make learning come alive.

  • Checklists Guide – this is a breakdown on how to use the lists for the month, with suggestions to help you get started.
  • Objectives Worksheet
  • Weekly Planning Worksheet
  • Blank Printable August Calendar
  • Four square planner : Faith, Kids, Back to School, Household
  • Evaluation Weekly Worksheets
  • Motivational Posters and Scripture Posters
  • Printable August Checklist
  • Fun Things to do in August Printable
  • August Holidays Printable Sheet
  • Field Trip Planning
  • Blank Party Planner for any Party
  • Tea Party Printable
  • Reading Log
  • Organization Checklist
  • Chore Schedule Blank Sheet
  • Quarterly Planning
  • School Planning Sheets
  • Sample School Schedules to Follow
  • Homeschool Weekly Planning Sheets
  • Meal Planning Helps and Suggestions

The directions on how to download the monthly checklist are sent out in each weekly ezine. The planner access information is always located at the bottom of each email. Make sure that you are signed up so that you don’t miss it.

If you are not signed up, you can sign up HERE as a subscriber.

 

Free July Ultimate Checklists Planner

July is such a busy and fun month full of Patriotic events, celebrations and just enjoying the hot summer months with friends and family. Let’s look at all the July fun activities and how to keep track of everything for your family.

What is there to do in July with your family?

The most patriotic American holiday is on July 4th ~ Independence Day. Many families will choose to have 4th of July picnics, take part in parades, and attend firework shows or concerts. You can have some great conversations with your family regarding our country and its history. You can discuss the constitution, what it means to be patriotic and gather together to pray for our country.

July is also one of the hottest months in the year for many areas. Even though it is hot, it seems to be a favorite month for picnics, backyard barbecues and get togethers. While you are spending a lot of time outdoors in the sun make sure that you keep cool.

Fun ideas for staying cool in July:

  • Visit a natural body of water in your area, like a lake, a beach, a spring, or a river. If you don’t have one near you consider making a long day trip or a short mini vacation.
  • Set up a sprinkler and let the kids run around and play in it.
  • Have a water party with water balloons, baby pools full of soapy bubbles, tarps with dish soap for a cheap slip and slide.
  • Make homemade popsicles or homemade ice cream. Homemade ice cream is a fun thing to do with your kids that will create some wonderful memories. (Hint: there is a free homemade ice cream recipe in this month’s Ultimate Checklist!)

How to keep track of all the summer fun events:

Our Ultimate Checklists is like a big family planner. It has so many amazing checklists, papers, worksheets, and brainstorming sheets to help you keep track of everything you need during the busy summer.

What is included in the July Ultimate Checklist?

This month’s checklist has everything you need to keep track of your summer fun. There are even planning sheets to get you to start thinking about the new school year. Even though we are in the middle of summer, a new homeschool year will creep up on us before we know it!

  • Checklists Guide – this is a breakdown on how to use the lists for the month, with suggestions to help you get started.
  • Objectives Worksheet
  • Weekly Planning Worksheet
  • Blank Printable July Calendar
  • Four square planner : Faith, Kids, Back to School, Household
  • Evaluation Weekly Worksheets
  • Motivational Posters and Scripture Posters
  • Printable July Checklist
  • July Holidays Printable Sheet
  • Independence Day Reflection Sheets
  • 4th of July Party Planner
  • Blank Party Planner for any Party
  • Fun Ideas for July
  • Printable Ice Cream Recipe with step-by-step instructions
  • Summer Reading List
  • Chore Schedule Blank Sheet
  • Quarterly Planning
  • Homeschool Weekly Planning Sheets
  • Meal Planning Helps and Suggestions

The directions on how to download the monthly checklist are sent out in each weekly ezine. The planner access information is always located at the bottom of each email. Make sure that you are signed up so that you don’t miss it.

If you are not signed up, you can sign up HERE as a subscriber.

Ultimate checklists july freebie

Homeschool Teens and Summer Vacation

Unless you homeschool year-round, your teens probably look forward to summer vacation! And so do we as homeschool parents. But teens who plan to attend college and win scholarships, need to keep in mind that they will often be asked on applications how they spent their summers during high school.

homeschool teens and summer vacation

What summer vacation should NOT become

Teens do NOT have to settle for a miserable summer. They need time off to have fun and relax. They do not need to cram their summer full of activities and classes they think will impression admissions counselors. Summer should not be a time to add to all the stress teens may already be feeling about getting into college.

How teens can use summer productively and still have fun

If teens spend time intentionally planning their summer, they can have an enjoyable 3 months and still have plenty to write about on college and scholarship applications. Students should consider what they enjoy doing and then come up with ideas on how to keep what they enjoy about the activity, but add another layer that will …

Some examples would be for someone who enjoys reading, to start a book club. Enjoy writing? Write a novel. A teen who loves playing computer games could learn how to create them. I know a number of teens who love a particular sport who are helping coach teams or acting as referees. This could be a paid or volunteer position.

Of course, getting a job shows that a student is prepared to work, and is capable of holding down a job. If they do it well, their boss could write them recommendation letters in the future. And jobs provide money plus teach so many skills so working during the summer is something to consider.

Another idea is for teens to take their passions and turn them into a business. This could be as simple as starting a blog, podcast, or Youtube channel about it and making money from affiliate sales and advertising, to creating a product or service around what they are interested in. One teen I know who loved ballet, decorated old ballet pointe shoes and sold them on Etsy. One of my sons built websites for other people. There are so many possibilities. Even if the business idea fails, the teen will have learned valuable lessons.

All high schoolers, homeschoolers too, are usually so busy during the school semester there isn’t time to try out new hobbies. Summer is the perfect time for that! Learn to play a musical instrument, take up pottery, macrame, calligraphy, whittling – it doesn’t matter what! Trying something new shows that you are open to learning and new experiences.

Even going away on vacation can be a valuable activity as well as enjoyable – get your teen to help plan the vacation. Perhaps they can research where to stay and the cheapest place to pick up gas on the way there. Give them a budget and let them plan activities at your destination. This has the added benefit of taking some of the preparation from the parents! My parents always involved us kids, and my husband and I have done the same with our children. It’s a great way to teach real-life skills

Documenting the vacation through a blog, photos, or video is another idea. Perhaps sign your child up for a Photography, Photoshop, or Video-editing class and let them practice their skills during and after your vacation.

A fun way for teens to start thinking about what college they might want to attend, how they will pay for it, and if they have the skills necessary to succeed at college, is to participate in FundFunda Academy’s annual summer High School Challenge for homeschoolers. Students have the whole of June and July to complete a number of challenges related to college prep that will earn them Target and Amazon gift cards – and the overall winner gets $150!

There are so many ways teens can have a fantastic summer AND have plenty of interesting activities to mention on applications. For more ideas take a look at my post on 101 Things for Teens to do in Summer.

Written by Meryl van der Merwe, host of the Homeschooling with Technology podcast.

Giving Your Homeschool Kids Time to Think

With all of the distractions that surround our families, it’s easy to gravitate toward zoning out. Often this takes the form of electronics, television, or gaming. But, do these things afford your homeschool kids time to think?

Let’s explore ways we can encourage directing our children toward deeper thinking, and see what benefits that reaps.

What is Giving Your Homeschool Kids Time to Think?

It may seem counterintuitive to ask the same student you just asked to “pay attention” to now let their mind be free of concentrated focus on school work to ponder ideas. But, this is in essence what thinking is. It’s allowing time to mull something over, chew on it a bit, and consider and ponder ideas. The ideas that your kids will entertain will certainly depend on their age and ability, but all kids can think deeply.

Feeding Them Big Ideas to Think On

In order to think deeply, we need some big ideas, right? For adults, this would come more easily– there’s so much going on in the world. But, for our children, it’s helpful to break things down. It doesn’t have to be a hard idea to think on, just a wide or deep one appropriate for their age and ability. Here are some ideas:

For Preschool:

  • How do you know God loves you?
  • How do you know Mommy loves you?
  • What is your favorite food? Why?

Kindergarten:

  • Why do you think the grass grows up?
  • Why is the Moon only seen at night?
  • Where does milk come from?
  • Why is the sky sometimes blue, sometimes gray, sometimes dark?
  • How does the phone ring?
  • Where does God live?

Elementary:

  • What is the Holy Spirit? How does He visit you?
  • When do you feel like God is close to you?
  • How can you pray for your friends?
  • What is your favorite book? Why?

Middle School:

  • What would you do to change the world and make it a better place?
  • How could you volunteer in your church or community?
  • What do you believe about God?
  • Why do you think there are so many varieties of flowers?
  • What would you like to learn new this summer?

High School:

  • Would you rather live to 100 or have endless money?
  • Do you think countries should have borders?
  • If you’d been born at the time of the American War for Independence, would you have been a Patriot or Tory? Why?

These can go on and on. You can pull ideas from your homeschooling materials. There are also some great lists to bookmark. Try here, here, and here.

 

Give Them Time to Think

Of course, they have to have time to think deeply, right? Consider times in your natural daily rhythm that could provide this opportunity.

Maybe you could introduce questions and ideas in the morning at breakfast.

Get creative here — you could write them down for older kids, write them on a whiteboard, have a “question-of-the-week”, etc.  Then be intentional about allowing time for reflection. Limit screen time. Establish a “do nothing” hour, and get outside. Whatever you need to do to create the time they need to work on thinking. And believe me, thinking is work!

Allow Them to Develop Their Own Thoughts

Obviously, some of the questions to consider and ponder don’t require as much as others. But, every homeschool mom knows the value of rabbit trails. After all, that’s how delight-directed learning was born. And seriously, isn’t that part of the reason we homeschool?

To have the time to pursue thought (rabbit trails) that engage our kids’ minds and hearts? If you’ve given them a good meal of ideas, you need to give them time to not only eat them, but digest them.

Don’t look for Sunday School answers; those yes/no questions and answers that rob kids of the desire to think deeply. Ask them questions they can’t know the answer to right away or without thought. Then give them time to develop those thoughts.

Journal, Draw, Orate, Discuss Big Ideas

Now that our kids have an idea they are turning over in their minds, they need a tool to be able to reason through it. What will that tool be? Consider these options:

  • Journaling gives your wordy, writing student the opportunity to reason, reason, relate, and write or record their thought process. This is helpful in many ways. It can allow them to read their own thinking back to themselves to see that it is sound or well-reasoned. Journaling can be an outlet for emotional reasoning. It removes the confrontation of verbally expressing ideas. It prepares them for defending their written words.
  • Drawing or art can be a beautiful way to express thought. Some of your kids may draw pictures of what they are thinking on the inside. This is helpful for both student and parent as it can build communication pathways you didn’t know existed.
  • Discussion, debate, and arguing a point of view are perfect for those teens who feel passionately about ideas and thoughts and are at that age where defending them comes naturally. This is the ideal discipleship opportunity and a true window for growth for your teen (and even for you!)

Benefits of Allowing Kids Time to Think

There are so many benefits, including introducing the world to humans who can think, reason, and relate. But the biggest benefit is the relationships built along the way with your children.

Let’s Talk About Giving Homeschool Kids Time to Think

I’ll be speaking at the True North Homeschool Academy’s Summer SPLASH! Virtual EduSummit with a panel discussion on entrepreneurship, and two workshops: Giving Kids Time to Think and Podcasting as Education. Join me there for live Q & A and the opportunity to learn more about how we can give our kids time to think!

I have a special coupon code for my readers and listeners: Use the code:    felice20 at checkout to get a $5 ticket to the Summit!

I hope to see you there!

Felice Gerwitz

Celebrate the Stars and Stripes

Flag Day is celebrated annually on June 14 in the United States. This day commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened on that day in 1777. One of the most recognizable symbols in the world, the American flag symbolizes freedom and liberty, and it has been flown by Americans since the birth of our great country

Let's Celebrate the Stars and Stripes with image of the American flag

Celebrate the Stars and Stripes on June 14 

By Crystal Niehoff

Outside the headquarters of General George Washington in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 1, 1776, the first unofficial flag was raised. It was then called the Continental Colors or the Grand Union Flag. This was done because the Continental Army was reorganized, placing the American armed forces under General Washington’s control by order of a Congressional resolution.

The flag had the British Union Flag in the upper left-hand corner since the colonies were still part of Great Britain. There was also another early flag bearing a rattlesnake with the motto, “Don’t Tread on Me.” At the time, the snake was the established symbol for America.

When did the American Flag become official?

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted the first official flag of the United States. This was right after declaring independence from England. This flag bore 13 red and white stripes representing the original 13 colonies and 13 stars set in a blue canton located on the top left-hand side. It’s uncertain who designed the flag. However, Continental Congress member Francis Hopkinson later claimed to have had a hand in its design. 

We also don’t know who made the first flag either. Popular belief passed down over the centuries that Betsy Ross sewed the first American flag at the request of George Washington. Unfortunately, there is no record of its creator in historical documents or the vast journals and correspondence from that time period.

Celebrating the Stars and Stripes

Since that day, the Stars and Stripes have been flown high all over our great country. And, over the years, stars were added as new states have joined the Union. As of this writing, Old Glory boasts 50 stars and13 stripes. The stripes remain to represent the original 13 colonies. As the number of stars has increased, the meaning of the flag has evolved over time as well.

Today, the flag proudly symbolizes freedom and liberty for all Americans regardless of race, color, or creed. The article, History of the American Flag published on PBS.org, explains that the “colors of the flag are symbolic as well; red symbolizes hardiness and valor, white symbolizes purity and innocence, and blue represents vigilance, perseverance, and justice.”

Flag Day is the perfect opportunity to learn more about the flag and its extraordinary history. So take some time to research the flag and its meaning, and maybe even fly it yourself on June 14! If you do, take a picture and share it with us in the comments below.

About the author:

Crystal Niehoff is an Army chaplain’s wife, mom of five, and grandma to five. In the year 2000, Crystal and her family began their homeschooling journey, which continues with her oldest granddaughter. Previously a child welfare worker, and the former owner and CEO of Army Wife Network. Crystal also holds certifications as a birth and bereavement doula and chaplain. She hosts a weekly podcast for military homeschoolers, the Military Homeschool Podcast, and co-hosts History for Christian Teens, with her husband, Kevin.

 

Creation Summer Camp

Creation Summer Camp

Just thinking about summer creation camp brings a smile to my face. I never attended one as a child, but I sure put in my time at many church summer camp events. What I found was the children had a blast, the parents were happy with the faith-based content and safe environment with their children, the teens received volunteer service hours, and the adults who taught these classes became exhausted by the end of the day.

Listen to my podcast on Creation Summer Camp here (of course you can do a Creation Camp whenever you wish!) or to purchase the digital product go to MediaAngels.com/store

Fast forward, I wanted to teach my young children about the wonders of God’s creation and have this mini-camp at home. I enlisted my daughter Christina and her college friend, Amy to help write the curriculum based on the days of Creation, with a goal of doing this in one week. The girls tested the activities out on my younger three children and we managed to make adjustments as needed. One thing I wanted them to do is to create a spread sheet with a detailed list of all the items need and the quantities. And, we included these in our digital kits.

The creation camp was a success! One year at the state conference where I spoke we put together the entire thing in a box ready to go. These kits contained everything a family needed including the markers, colored sand, and even the glue. There were short experiments and fun activities that went along with each Creation Day.

The  Creation Summer Camp Contains:

  1. Student Manual
  2. Parent Manual
  3. List of Supplies

The kit is in digital format and it has all of the experiments and activities ready to print out for the kids. You can print as many as you want for an individual family (if you want permission for a camp please contact me felicegerwitz @ gmail.com)

Creation Summer Camp Supplies:

Creation It takes about an hour to make your list of things you should buy. Most of the supplies are things you have at home, paper, pencils and pens, markers or crayons, and liquid glue. Other things will take a list of easy-to-find supplies. For example, there is an activity that demonstrates that the animals left footprints on the wet surfaces and we do this with a flat sugar cookie and animal crackers. You may have this in your home so that is great. We also use droppers for water, but a straw works the same way but can be a little harder to use without letting too much water spill out.

What are the days of creation? Often we teach the 7 days of creation. Well, on the seventh day we teach that God rested. This helps us and the kids remember that Sunday should be a day of rest. The Genesis account of the days of Creation is all in Genesis Chapter 1 while the verse about the Lord resting begins in Genesis 2. The Creation camp helps the children realize the importance of reading the Bible. The activities in this kit also help the children to remember the scriptures.

I invite you to take a week to study Genesis with your family. It is a wonderful time to make memories with your kids that will be lasting. The children will enjoy these activities and will even add some of their own.

 

 

June Ultimate Checklists and Planning Resources

June is a time where school has mostly ended, or is winding down to be a lighter more relaxed load. Now it begins the time for summer planning. Whether you school year round or take a full summer off for school, there is still a lot of summer fun to be had.june ultimate lists text with image of a beach.

Summer time is a great break with the ability to spend extra quality time with your family or friends. Not only are there summer vacations or staycations there are lots of activities and events to attend. The summer season also includes lots of cook outs, picnics and time spent around the water.

Especially if you live somewhere that is hot, like we do here in Florida, you will be spending a lot of time around the water this summer. If we are outside for long periods of time it must include water since it is always so hot in the middle of the day.

As you are planning for your summer events don’t forget to plan and schedule swim lessons, or refresher swim lessons. My kids have great memories of their summer swim lessons. Once they get over the fear of the water, they enjoy the tradition of summer swim lessons. We reward them with ice cream and popsicles at the end of the week too which is another great memory and summer tradition.

June events to plan for:

Other events that you will want to make sure you plan for this summer is Father’s Day and any June birthdays. You  might as well get started on planning for the 4th of July as well. Since June is usually a lighter month of school (or maybe you take school off completely), there may be some summer projects you want to accomplish while you have the time.

Summer break is a great time to work on any home improvement projects or to reorganize book shelves or the school room. We like to go through bedrooms over the summer and make piles of donations to take to local thrift stores. I try to get my children to purge clothes, toys and books. We even take them to resell shops to earn some extra money for summer treats and trips.

This month’s Ultimate Checklists subscriber freebie has all of the planning sheets that you need for the month of June.

What is included in the June Ultimate Checklist?

This month’s checklist has planning help for Father’s Day with gift ideas, June birthdays, and 4th of July planning sheets. There are even healthy eating and weight loss goals for summer. Of course, there are still the blank ones for those that like to plan everything out themselves and customize the lists for their families.

  • Checklists Guide – this is a breakdown on how to use your lists for the month, with suggestions to help you get started.
  • Objectives Worksheet
  • Weekly Planning Worksheet
  • Blank Printable June Calendar
  • Four square planner  – Faith, Kids, School and Household
  • Evaluation Weekly Worksheets
  • Motivational Posters and Day Posters
  • Printable June Checklist
  • June Holidays Printable Sheet
  • June Crafts and Treats
  • Summer Reading List
  • Father’s Day Gift Idea Forms
  • June Goal Sheets
  • 4th of July Planning Sheets
  • Healthy Eating and Weight Loss Goals
  • End of School Clean Up List
  • End of School Year Check Up
  • Chore Schedule Blank Sheet
  • Quarterly Planning
  • Homeschool Weekly Planning Sheets
  • Meal Planning Helps and Suggestions

The directions on how to download the monthly checklist are sent out in each weekly ezine. The planner access information is always located at the bottom of each email. Make sure that you are signed up so that you don’t miss it.

If you are not signed up, you can sign up HERE as a subscriber.