Online Tools to Help Teens Study

Online Study Tools

Episode 30: Online Tools to Help Teens Study

Join our Facebook Group especially for the listeners of this podcast!

And visit our sponsor FundaFunda Academy to see the classes they are offering for high school credit this summer. Photography is one class that is ideal to take over the summer when there are plenty of things to photograph for assignments.

This time of year many students are studying for exams. Here are a few online tools to help teens study.

Youtube

Look on Youtube for video reviews for all AP exams. You will also find reviews for many other subjects.

Flashcard programs

Although all these websites come with many decks of flashcards created by students and teachers, it will be more advantageous for teens to create their own as when they do that, that is how they will learn the best.

  • Memrise allows users to choose a “mem” (a graphic) to help you remember.
  • Studystack asks you “know” or “dont know” after every flash card and has lots of games including hangman, crossword puzzles and unscrambling letters.
  • Quizlet allows you to select how you want to test yourself – matching, T/F, multiple choice or type the answer. They also have an asteroids game called “Gravity”. To use Quizlet for language study, listen to episode 25: “How to use Quizlet to learn foreign language vocabulary with Suzette Laporte-Ayo
  • Gocongr allows a “Thumbs up” and “Thumbs down” to indicate if you have mastered a flash card. It also allows you to create Mindmaps.
  • Tiny cards is created by Duolingo and has similar features. You learn a few flash cards and then you get a question to check if you have learned those. So testing is integrated into the studying.

Sparknotes

Sparknotes is not just about literature anymore. They now provide summaries and study guides for many other subjects. These include lists of key people, key terms and formulas. Some topics even have quizzes.

Quiz Games

Quizziz and Kahoot are fun ways to review once students think they have done sufficient studying. Kahoot only has single player mode available on their app. Quizziz can be played alone on a laptop. Both are fun to use for a study session for a few teens.

If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and give a rating and maybe even a review!

Contact Meryl via email on meryl@mediaangels.com or connect with her on Pinterest, Instagram, and Facebook

Online Tools to Help Teens Study #studytools #examhelp #homeschoolhighschool

HSHSP Ep 156: How to Not Be Intimidated by Homeschooling High School, Interview with Misty Bailey

This week on HSHSP Ep 156: How to Not Be Intimidated by Homeschooling High School, Interview with Misty Bailey!

HSHSP Ep 156: How to Not Be Intimidated by Homeschooling High School, Interview with Misty Bailey. Tips for building confidence to homeschool high school. #HomeschoolHighSchool

HSHSP Ep 156: How to Not Be Intimidated by Homeschooling High School, Interview with Misty Bailey

We are so excited to catch up with our friend, Misty Bailey, as we discuss ways to build confidence for homeschooling high school.

Misty is a mom of 3 homeschoolers from 8th grade/high school down to elementary school. She is also the host of the popular podcast Joyfully Homeschooling and Finding Joy in the Journey blog.

Misty is a pioneer homeschool high schooling mom. Most moms in her area have sent their teens to traditional school at when they start 9th grade. Misty decided to break that mold. She has learned to not be intimidated by homeschooling high school! How did she do it?

Photo used by permission.

Give it to God! He will give you confidence to homeschool high school with your teens. Misty Bailey's interview with Homeschool Highschool Podcast

Misty’s goals for her homeschool high school program is to:

  • Give her teens a biblical worldview
  • Develop her teens’ gifts and characters

Misty has confidence in her homeschooling high school because she knows she is where God wants her and her family. She is humble enough to change things if He guides her to do so, but she loves where they are now. Listen to this interview with Misty Bailey. You’ll also enjoy this post about high school from Misty and these posts from us.

An Authoritative Guide on How to Homeschool High School

An Authoritative Guide to Electives for Homeschool High School

 

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HSHSP Ep 156: How to Not Be Intimidated by Homeschooling High School, Interview with Misty Bailey

Developing Language Skills in your Young Learner

LCP Ep 13: Developing Language Skills in your Young Learner

 

Developing Language Skills in your Young Learner podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #languageskills #languagearts #reading #writing #preschool #elementary #literarycafepodcast #drseuss #rhyming #rhythm #repetitionThe time to start reading and developing language skills in your young learner is now.

Reading at least 15 minutes per day from the time your child is an infant and even through high school will not only promote a bond with your child and an enjoyment in reading, but help develop vocabulary, reading, and writing skills.

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she shares step by step how to easily develop language skills in your young learner with practical tips, resources, and book and activity ideas that help you get started right away.

Show Notes

Developing Language Skills in your Young Learner

If you suspect your child is experiencing language or processing issues, you may want to check out Dianne Craft’s articles and materials at diannecraft.org. I used quite a few of her materials, articles, and her Brain Integration Therapy guide.

Book Title Suggestions for Rhyme, Rhythm and Repetition

Start with simple Dr. Seuss Books – Hop on Pop, Dr. Seuss’s ABC’s, One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish

Then longer Dr. Seuss Books – Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham

Sheep in a Jeep

Sheep Go to Sleep

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you See?

Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What do you Hear?

Assorted Poetry Books – The Random House Book of Poetry for Children, The 20th Century Children’s Poetry Treasury

Reading Activity Suggestions

Start with nursery rhymes and finger and hand motions while you recite them together.

As you read together, point to each word as you read it aloud.

Point to the pictures on the page and comment and ask questions about them. (Depending on the age of your child, you can ask them a question about what a picture is or a color in the picture.) As they get older or more familiar with the book, you can ask more complex questions. (Visit Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in your Reading to gain ideas in asking questions and developing thinking skills.)

Repeat reading the same books (as long as your child shows interest in it) for at least 15 minutes per day.

Use your child’s finger to point at the words as you say them and allow them to turn the page if they want.

Take turns reading sentences or pages so that your child doesn’t feel overwhelmed by reading too much at one time. (For practical and fun ways to engage reluctant readers, visit Ultimate List of Fun Ways to Engage your Reluctant Reader.)

Put magnetic letters on the refrigerator for play opportunities.

Have a letter of the day or week and let your child tell you whenever they see that letter during the day.

Depending on what kind of learner you have, you could try different kinds of activities to learn the alphabet

Songs, chants and books read aloud (audio books) for auditory learners

Use pictures of the alphabet that have animals or pictures within the letters so that the learner can make connections or stories to help them remember the letters for visual learners.

For tactile or kinesthetic learner –
Cut letters out of sand paper and trace the letters with their fingers.
Trace letters of the alphabet in the sand or shaving cream or finger paint.
Trace letters in the air using whole arm movements and paint letters on the driveway with water and a paint brush.
Form letters with your whole body or out of play dough or pipe cleaners.

For rhyming books or poetry –

Read a line with a rhyming word at the end and stop reading once you get to the rhyming word and let your child say the rhyming word.
Copy down the poem and leave a space at the end of the line for the rhyming word and let your child fill in the blank.

For Sight Words –

Copy sight words down on index cards to make flash cards. (If your child has a difficult time reading a part of the word, write that part of the word in a different color.) (Go to www.sightwords.com for lists of words and activity suggestions.)
Copy word family words down on index cards to make flash cards and write the word family sound in a different color.
Make duplicate copies of these words for games – Go Fish, Old Maid, Memory or Concentration Matching Game.

For Writing Activity Suggestions

Have your child paint or draw a picture on the top half of a page of paper. Then have your child tell you in a sentence what the picture is about. Write down what your child says underneath the picture as he/she says it so they can connect what they are saying to what you are writing down.

As your child gets older begin the practice of having them retell parts of stories back to you or short stories back to you. Then have them practice writing down one sentence at a time (even if they are using inventive or “creative” spelling) until they can write down more than one sentence, building up to multiple sentences. They can then draw a picture about what they just wrote about.

For detailed steps and more ways to help your struggling or early writer, visit Teaching your Struggling Writer How to Write.)

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share about developing language skills that your family has found helpful! Or, if you found any ideas here helpful or have any questions! I would love to hear from you!

Thanks for visiting!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page! And make sure you share this page with other homeschoolers with middle and high schoolers and are wondering how to get started writing in these grade levels!

 

Developing Language Skills in your Young Learner podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #languageskills #languagearts #reading #writing #preschool #elementary #literarycafepodcast #drseuss #rhyming #rhythm #repetition

 

 

HSHSP Ep 153: Helping Homeschool High Schoolers Adjust to Group Classes

This week on HSHSP Ep 153: Helping Homeschool High Schoolers Adjust to Group Classes!

HSHSP Ep 153: Helping Homeschool High Schoolers Adjust to Group Classes. Homeschool high schoolers often take co-op, group or dual-enrollment courses. Here are tips for success.

HSHSP Ep 153: Helping Homeschool High Schoolers Adjust to Group Classes

Sabrina, Vicki and Kym love our homeschool co-ops and group classes. They have been an important part of all their homeschool high schoolers’ education. However, it can be a big adjustment for young folks who haven’t had the opportunity until high school.

While there’s not ONE right way to homeschool high school, it’s not unusual to start joining group-learning situations at that age.

Co-op and Group classes:

Share expectations and rules openly and beforehand. (Try not to rely simply on unwritten rules, but try not to have too many rules.) You’ll love this episode to help explain our group classes’ GOOF way to handle this.

Deal well with Mean Moms who don’t know the rules. You’ll like this interview with Melanie Wilson for an explanation of *relationship before rules*.

Here are our tips for walking into group classes for the first time (good for introverts):

  • Enter a room with shoulders back, chin up and a Mona Lisa smile. (These are welcoming nonverbals that tell others it’s okay to talk to you. Download this freebie from Vicki Tillman Coaching for more tips.)
  • Scan the room. Give yourself a minute to calmly choose a chair that looks comfortable for you.
    • Remember, if chairs are in rows, the first 2 rows or a seat down the middle of the room are usually best for academic success. (Called the *T zone*.)

Here are our tips for being in a group discussion class (like Literature class or World Language classes):

  • Teachers: Try poker chips. Everyone is given 3 chips at the beginning of the discussion. Students contribute a chip to the pot whenever they contribute to the discussion. This gives quieter kids the *right* to talk and talkier kids the *right* to take turns.
  • Teachers: Scan the room and invite quieter kids into the conversation. (If you watch nonverbals, you’ll learn when they have something they’d like to say.)
  • Students and Teachers: Try to discover how you *engage* (what kind of learner are you?). For example:
    • Sabrina does better in meetings or trainings if she is taking notes (that’s why she often volunteers as secretary for meetings if 7Sister Allison isn’t there).
    • Kym takes air notes (think air guitar for note taking).
    • Vicki scribbles on her paper to help her focus.
    • How do your students pay attention?

Students: Understand the difference between a lecture and the teacher explaining something to you:

  • If the teacher is in the middle of a lesson/lecture. DON’T interrupt.
    • Jot questions down and ask later.
  • If a teacher is informally chatting.
    • Go ahead and raise your hand to ask question.
  • Don’t publicly challenge your teacher unless you know they like that. (It’s a good way to get on a teacher’s bad side, and besides, it is rude.)
    • Use office hours or email for challenge.

If a student is taking a dual-enrollment college class:

  • Act like a college student.
    • Make us of office hours.
    • Participate in class.
    • Do your work well.
    • Sit in T zone. As Kym says: *Front Row Geeks*.
    • Be the last student out of the classroom.
      • Never close your notebooks while the teacher is still talking.

Join Sabrina, Vicki and Kym for a delightful, information-packed discussion. You’ll also love these posts. BTW- You can listen to 7Sisters blog posts on Alexa. Here’s how.

5 Tips for Academic Success in College

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HSHSP Ep 153: Helping Homeschool High Schoolers Adjust to Group Classes

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading

LCP Ep 12: Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading

 

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading with Literary Cafe Podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reading #higherorderthinkingskills #criticalthinkingskills #languageartsAre you wondering what we mean by “higher order thinking skills” or “critical thinking skills”?

And what do you do with them and how do you teach them to your children? And how are you supposed to do that with reading?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she explains what higher order thinking skills are, why they are important, and how you can practice them with your children in fun and easy ways.

 

Show Notes

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills with Your Reading

Different Levels and Kinds of Higher Order Thinking Skills

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Thinking skills can be organized in a hierarchy of difficulty (and also according to stage of child and learning development). In other words, from least to most difficult and acquired as a child ages.

For a detailed description of these thinking skills, what they look like in your child, why they are important, and how to practice using them in easy and fun ways, you will want to listen to the podcast.

Bloom’s Taxonomy is a method of labeling and describing the different levels of thinking skills and what they entail.

Knowledge or Remembering – This thinking skill is the ability to recall information and details or memorize facts or words.

Comprehension or Understanding – This skill requires the need to understand the meanings of the words and what they mean when used together in phrases or sentences to express an idea. Your child needs to have the vocabulary knowledge and the capacity to understand the concept being presented.

Application or Applying – Not only does this skill require understanding and comprehension of something, but also the ability to take that learned and understood information and apply it to a similar situation.

Analysis or Analyzing – This skill requires understanding something and making connections in what is being read or studied because the connections are not spelled out or clearly identified for the learner. The learner has to make the connections on his or her own.

Synthesis or Revising – This thinking skill allows your child to make a leap or build new thoughts based on the connections they’ve made using the other thinking skills we’ve been discussing – formulating what they are comprehending, learning, and connecting from the reading and making something new or forming new thoughts from all of this.

Evaluation – This is where your child learns to make a judgment about something, form an opinion or make a decision.

Question Starters to Practice Different Levels of Thinking Skills

Bloom’s Question Starters Handout

Higher Order Thinking Question Stems Handout

Suggested Activities to Practice Using Different Levels of Thinking Skills

Recalling and retelling information through retelling what your learner has heard during a read aloud of a short story or chapter.

Graphic Organizers or Mind Mapping – Use these to practice thinking skills and organize and use different concepts or ideas.

Graphic Organizers to Print

Mind Map Examples for Different Topics

Activities and Projects Related to a Book (Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literature Study) – using different kinds of thinking skills and learning styles

Podcast and Show Notes with Handout for Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literature Study

Have your learner create his or her own assessment to either give to another learner or themselves – a quiz, test, paper, project – and have them write it to include different levels of thinking skills. They would also need an answer key or something to evaluate the outcome of the assessment, requiring them to use even more thinking skills.

Have your learner create a lesson plan around your book, maybe literary devices or techniques, story elements used in the book, or character analysis. Have him or her include a lesson to present with created visual aides, guided practice opportunity with the class like an activity, game, or class practice, and an assessment like a quiz, practice worksheet, or other assignment.

Consciously making the effort and taking time to incorporate different levels of questions or activities or projects not only can make reading more interesting but definitely expands your learner’s thinking abilities and prepares them for knowing how to think – and not just answer questions only requiring recall.

This helps to develop our problem solvers, innovators, creators, and leaders of tomorrow.

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share about using and practicing thinking skills  that your family has found helpful! Or, if you found any ideas here helpful or have any questions! I would love to hear from you!

Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for March’s topic when we discuss developing language skills in your younger learners. I have all kinds of practical and fun ways to get your early learners reading and writing and loving it! We are also going to be tying it to Dr. Seuss’ birthday which is also celebrated in March!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page! And make sure you share this page with other homeschoolers with middle and high schoolers and are wondering how to get started writing in these grade levels!

 

Using Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Reading with Literary Cafe Podcast #homeschool #homeschooling #literarycafepodcast #reading #higherorderthinkingskills #criticalthinkingskills #languagearts

 

 

HSHSP Ep 150: Why All the Language Arts Credits in Homeschool? Interview with Katie Glennon

This week HSHSP Ep 150: Why All the Language Arts Credits in Homeschool? Interview with Katie Glennon.

HSHSP Ep 150: Why All the Language Arts Credits in Homeschool? Interview with Katie Glennon. Reading, Writing and Speech skills help teens grow in their thinking and confidence skills!

HSHSP Ep 150: Why All the Language Arts Credits in Homeschool? Interview with Katie Glennon

Homeschool high schoolers need 4 Language Arts credits on their transcripts. Why so many? We went to our friend, Katie Glennon, of Literary Cafe podcast and Katie’sHomeschoolCottage.com to find out.

Katie and her husband were originally teachers. Katie left education and had 2 children. They began homeschooling when one son was too wiggly for success in the traditional classroom. They kept on homeschool right through high school. (He’s now a Summa Cum Laude college graduate!)

Homeschooling was important for her next son, who has dyslexia (he is now in college, btw).

Katie believes that homeschooling in generally and especially in Language Arts, we will have the most success if we:

  • Play to their interests
  • Play to their skills

Teens need a rich Language Arts experience to help them develop their thinking and communication skills. To help with with these skills, give them exposure to

  • literature at their level and interests
  • speech at their level and interests
  • writing at their level and interests

Giving teens reading, speaking and writing skills is important because words can plant goodness and growth in their lives!

Giving teens reading, speaking and writing skills is important because words can plant goodness and growth in their lives!

Teach them to analyze what they read through their filter as a Christian. We can develop this skill by discussing what they are reading together. Have them participate in the discussion so that they can solidify a good critical thinking filter. (Mom might be wise to read along with her teens so she knows what they are reading and can discuss it. Audiobooks can help with this.)

How did Katie do discussion with her wiggly son? She found that if he was being respected for his opinions and could talk while he wiggled, he did great!

Be sure to give homeschool high schoolers background that helps them understand the context of the writing:

  • General historical context (the world of the Pilgrims was a different context than that of the Enlightenment)
  • The writer’s personal context (Charles Dickens’ family had experience with debtor’s prison)
  • The way the book, poem or speech influenced the world (Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin)

Teach teens basic speech skills (even if they only use it in the living room). This helps then focus their thinking skills and confidence. (7SistersHomeschool.com has a popular Speech curriculum.)

How did she handle reading with her son who had dyslexia? Read alouds, brain-integration therapy, allowing him choice in reading material.

You’ll enjoy Katie’s podcast. Try this great episode on book reports: Essential Guide to Out of the Box Book Report Ideas and Literary Study.

Visit her website with encouragement, resources, tutoring and courses: Katie’s Homeschool Cottage.

And you’ll enjoy Katie’s favorite Homeschool Highschool Podcast episode: Heavy Equipment Mothering.

Why is Language Arts Such a HUGE Credit?

How to Handle 3 Most Dreaded Parts of Language Arts Credits

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HSHSP Ep 150: Why All the Language Arts Credits in Homeschool? Interview with Katie Glennon

HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript

What are the 4 types of courses your homeschool high schoolers need on their transcripts?

HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript

This week on HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript.

HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript. Basic requirements for homeschool transcript for graduation.

HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript

What kinds of courses do homeschool high schoolers need for graduation?

That is one of our FAVORITE topics! Join Sabrina and Vicki for a rollicking conversation about homeschool transcripts, courses and credits.

In a nutshell, teens need these four kinds of courses for a powerful transcript:

Core academic courses:

  • Core academics are the basic courses all transcripts need. Core academic courses include Language Arts, Maths, Social Studies, Science, and World Languages.
  • The number of credits needed in each of these categories varies by state, supervising organization or college of interest to your teen.

Other courses required by your state, supervising organization or college your teen wants to go to:

These types of course requirements vary widely from state to state. They also vary from family to family. Each family’s needs and interests are different. That’s the joy of homeschooling! Your teens can develop the transcript that is right for each of them. Examples of other courses would be: Fine Arts, Physical Education, Health, Social Sciences, and Drivers Education.

Elective courses:

These are courses that help your homeschool high schooler explore or develop an interest or skill. For teens who don’t have a clue what they are interested in, choose a wide variety of different kinds of courses until they land on something they love. For teens who are already invested in an interest or talent, enrich their experiences with courses in those areas.

7Sisters offers LOTS of elective choices (because we’ve had LOTS of different kinds of teens in our families and in our co-ops and group classes, so we’ve developed curriculum to meet their needs).

Career Exploration courses:

Career Exploration courses may be the most important courses of all. It is such an anxiety-producing experience for teens to come to senior year and feel like they have no direction. Get them started with a comprehensive Career Exploration program (our popular course has been, for years, getting homeschool high schoolers on the road toward their future).

Career Exploration: A Comprehensive Curriculum from 7 Sisters Homeschool

Click image for full product description.

Join Sabrina and Vicki for a you-can-do-it discussion of the courses your homeschool high schooler needs!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO HSHSP VIA COMPUTER

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  5. Click RATINGS AND REVIEW. (Please take a minute and do this. It helps others find us. Thanks!)
  6. Thanks!

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  6. Please tap *Ratings and Review* and give us some stars and a comment to help others find us more easily.
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Special Thanks to Our Network Sponsor -Bright Ideas Press

Homeschool moms are busy! Bright Ideas Press gets that. And that’s why, for over 25 years, we have promised to publish Christian-oriented homeschool curriculum that will fit your family—curriculum that is both affordable and easy-to-use with children of different ages and learning styles at the same time. Curriculum that busy Moms love!

Offering history, science, geography, and humanities curriculum and over 100 options of online classes and clubs for homeschool families, the team at Bright Ideas Press creates products and resources that will not only help simplify your life, but also inspire, encourage, and equip you to educate your children.

Find out more here!


HSHSP Ep 149: Got-to-Have Types of Courses for Homeschool Transcript

HSHSP Ep 146: Helping Teens Find Their Passions, Interview with Cindy West

This week on HSHSP Ep 146: Helping Teens Find Their Passions, Interview with Cindy West.

Helping Teens Find Their Passions, Interview with Cindy West. Help homeschool high schoolers explore interests and talents for transcript credit.

HSHSP Ep 146: Helping Teens Find Their Passions, Interview with Cindy West

Join Vicki and our friend, Cindy West, of Our Journey Westward, NaturExplorers, and Homeschooling Gifted Kids. Cindy, who is well-known to many homeschool families,  has been homeschooling for 18 years has specialized in helping her homeschool high schoolers find and develop their interests and passions.

Cindy West of Our Journey Westward shares with Homeschool Highschool Podcast ways to help teens capture their passions as part of their academics.

Cindy West.
Photo used by permission.

Cindy’s teens learned how to identify, develop and make choices for their futures in their homeschool programs. Cindy shares how she helped her homeschool high schoolers lean into their interests and allow them to become passions.

  • Observe: Where do they get excited? Where do they invest their free time?
  • Get experiences: Go on field trips. Do some volunteer work, help others out who are in the field of interest. Go to the library
  • Discuss with experts: Interview adults. See if you can find shadowing or apprenticeship opportunities.
  • Include as part of their academic studies: Develop science, history and/or language arts courses.
  • Include as part of their career exploration electives: Give it an appropriate name and capture it on the transcript.

One of the special things that Cindy has done with her teens is allowing her teens to develop their own courses.

  • Divide the year into 36 weeks
  • Explore on the internet what other people cover for those courses
  • Ask teen to pinpoint their interests/goals for the course
  • Find a *spine*, a textbook or detailed, informative book (probably not in the juvenile section) as a base
  • Choose at least one major project: research paper, prepare a presentation, design an experiment
  • Plan out the year, month by month based on the topics of teen interest and what others cover
  • Turn the plan into a syllabus
  • Learn more about this with Cindy’s post on the topic.

Teens who develop their interests in homeschool high school gain important skills for life. Homeschool Highschool Podcast interview with Cindy West.

Cindy’s daughter was passionate about equine studies and developed high school courses to develop those interests. Her son has been interested in guitar, so they have deeply developed this interest and giftedness.

You’ll be blessed by this interview with Cindy West. Visit her website and social media, curriculum AND check out her book on homeschooling gifted kids to learn more!

Take a look at 7Sisters Career Exploration curriculum to help discover interests and gifts. You’ll also enjoy these posts.

Homeschool High School Transcript: How to Earn Credits

Homeschool Career Exploration: Discovering Interests and Skills

 

HSHSP Ep 146: Helping Teens Find Their Passions, Interview with Cindy West

Essential Writing in your Homeschool High School

LCP Ep 11: Essential Writing in your Homeschool High School

 

Essential Writing in your Homeschool High School #literarycafepodcast #homeschoolradioshow #homeschool #highschool #writing #essays
Do you have a middle or high schooler and you are wondering what do you need to teach them for writing for credit or for preparation for college?

Intimidated by the kind of essays that are usually included during high school and are necessary for college applications, standardized tests, and classes?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she shares with you what is considered essential writing in your homeschool high school for high school credit, experience, and college preparation.

 

Show Notes

Types of Essays to Practice in High School

(This is a list of suggestions starting with the less challenging to more difficult and most common kinds of writing to other kinds of experience you may want to include.)

Informative essay (try a 5 paragraph format for this as your first kind of essay if starting here)

Persuasive/Argumentative essay (common for standardized tests with an essay)

Summary Paper (can be about an essay or article and the author’s viewpoint)

Compare/Contrast

Literary Analytical or Critical essay

Research Paper (MLA is common, but there are also APA and Chicago formats as well)

Cause/Effect

Definition

Narrative (can be a personal anectdote – common for the the college application)

Descriptive (can be describing a scene, person, or object using all senses and can incorporate creative writing)

Process Analysis (step by step writing that would be used in technical writing)

Cover Letter and Resume

 

Websites with Prompts for Different Kinds of Writing

These sites assist your upper middle and high schooler with gaining practice writing different kinds of essays, including preparing for essays on standardized tests that some college admission offices require and prompts for essays on past college applications that used the Common Application.

Persuasive Essay Prompts

More Persuasive Essay Prompts

General Writing Prompts to Warm up your Early High Schooler

Prompts for Various Kinds of High School Essays

Various Writing Prompts and Writing Activities for High Schoolers

Practice Using Literary Devices in Writing with Valentine’s Day theme

 

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share about writing in high schooler that your family has found helpful! I would love to hear from you!

Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for February’s topic when we discuss including practice of using higher order thinking skills when reading for all ages. You will be amazed by all the skills and benefits your learners can gain by making a point to prompt them to use various levels of thinking!

Make sure you download our podcast at iTunes or subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page! And make sure you share this page with other homeschoolers with middle and high schoolers and are wondering how to get started writing in these grade levels!

 

Essential Writing in your Homeschool High School #literarycafepodcast #homeschoolradioshow #homeschool #highschool #writing #essays