iGen – Understanding the New Generation – MBFLP 211

iGen - understanding the new generation

Move over, Millennials – the new generation has arrived! Researcher Jean Twenge calls them iGen – the first generation that’s grown up with smart phone in hand. How has that shaped their thinking? What does that mean for the rest of us? How should we teach and prepare our children to interact with their generational peers? Are there things to watch out for – and opportunities to grasp? Join us for a discussion of Twenge’s book iGen and how this new culture impacts our family life, ministry, and society at large.


Discussion of Jean Twenge’s book iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy–and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood–and What That Means for the Rest of Us

Researcher Jean Twenge noticed that numerous cultural trend lines took a sharp turn about 2012 – the year after the majority of Americans were carrying smart phones. She marks this as the sign of a new generational group some have called Generation Z (following the Millennial “Generation Y”). She’s called them iGen – the generation shaped by the iPhone – and she makes a powerful case that the handheld devices might be the largest influencer in their thinking, philosophy, and personality.

What’s distinctive about this generation?

They are growing up online. The average high school senior now spends six hours a day on new media, including two hours of Internet and two and a quarter of text messaging – every day. Time previous generations spent on homework, extracurricular activities, after-school jobs, and hanging out with friends, has been replaced by hanging out online. They are insecure and unhappy from their constant diet of social media, and 34% have been cyberbullied. Because they know how people manage and manipulate their image, they are cynical about what they see even while it impacts them emotionally.

They value individualism. Like Millennials, they seek authenticity. As a rule, they will not tolerate criticism of anybody, especially themselves (though they are prone to self-criticism). They have largely embraced the sexual revolution (widespread pornography, abortion on demand, same sex marriage, normalization of transgenderism) as nobody’s business “as long as nobody is hurt.”

They are maturing more slowly. Their parents have been protective and the children have embraced child status well into their twenties. The typical high school senior today is less likely to have earned a driver’s license, had an after-school or summer job, gone out on a date, or even spent much time outside parents’ direct supervision.

They value safety. iGen’ers are less likely to engage in risky behaviors like reckless driving, drug and alcohol experimentation, or sex as teenagers – not because these activities are immoral (iGen appears to continue the Millennial rejection of religion), but because they aren’t safe.

Their social lives and identity are text-based online, so words are weaponized. This is why campus culture is becoming hysterical over controversial speakers or even contrary opinions. iGen students demand protection from challenging viewpoints and consider offensive words as literal, physical assault. They are less likely to have had scuffles on the playground as children; instead, they’ve grown up savaging one another by text message.

iGen - what we need to know about the new generation

Why should we care, and what should we do about it?

Although we may be raising our own family by older standards, this is the generation of our children and the culture they will need to navigate as adults. How can we prepare them to succeed?

Move slowly on cell phone and social media. Social media is linked to depression, especially in younger students. Although older teens need to understand these tools, Twenge suggests younger teens shouldn’t get cell phones any sooner than necessary, and then start with “dumb” flip phones rather than Internet capable. Even then, monitor usage closely.

Push them forward to independence. Get their driver’s license early. Encourage them to get jobs and learn to manage their own money. Teach them how the world works, how to evaluate choices and make decisions.

Encourage real-life friendships. Don’t over-regulate time with friends and activities, especially as they reach older teen years. Get them off their phones and out of the house more.

Train your Christian children to stand on the Scripture without applause. This generation is growing more hostile toward Christianity, and its hysterical reaction to opposition will make it resistant to the Spirit’s conviction. We can’t be surprised when they react, but neither can we simply refuse to speak up; We need to be “wise as serpents and harmless as doves,” and choose our words and opportunities with care.

 


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When Worldviews Collide

Finish Well Radio, Podcast #071, When Worldviews CollideIn “When Worldviews Collide,” Episode #071, Meredith Curtis explains how worldviews collide in our culture, especially on the college campus. She shares how she equipped her children to recognize worldviews in their professors and fellow students so that they could defend the Christian faith and share the Gospel. This doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Prepare now to recognize different worldviews and understand your own worldview. There are positive ways to share your worldview with gentleness and respect. Know the Truth, recognize deceit, understand the most common arguments each worldview uses, and defend the Truth. You can do it!

 

 

 


Proverbs 3:13-14 by Laura Nolette and Powerline Productions, Inc.Powerline Productions, Inc.

Being World Changers, Raising World Changers!

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Show Notes

Introduction: A Conversation on a College Campus about inclusivity and diversity

Hollywood’s Worldview

Disney’s Worldview

The World of Academia’s Worldview

How these worldviews infiltrate our Christian Worldview.

 

I explained each of the main worldviews in Finish Well Podcast “What is Your Worldview?” Episode #070. Be sure to listen to this podcast.

Summary of Worldviews.

How to Recognize Worldviews

Know the Truth

Recognize Deceit

Recognize Arguments Used & Buzzwords

Defend the Truth

 

How Taught/Learned Worldview

Early Years Christian Textbooks & Curriculum

Always Discussed False Information & Worldviews as They Occurred (Movies, Disney, TV Show, Extended Family)

Introduced Evolution and Other False Information & Worldviews in Middle School

Apologetics

Creation Science

Worldview Teaching: Understand the Times, How Then Shall We Live, Demolishing Strongholds, other books & DVDs

First Just Read Book, Then Started Class where we Role-Played, Made Up Skits, Discussed

Examine Movies, Shows, Books, Conversations for Worldview.  

 

The Fruit In My Teens’ Lives

Questions/Conversations

Conversations with Peers

Conversations with Professors

Talking In Class

 

To Parents:

Love & Obey the Truth

Know the Truth—Examine Your Teachings & Beliefs

Teach the Truth

  • Examine your Textbooks, Curriculum, & Other Resources
  • Use Materials from a Biblical Perspective
  • Counter Unbiblical Teaching in Textbooks, Shows, Movies, Disney, Documentaries

Teach Your Kids to Teach the Truth

  • Teach How to Respond in False Worldview Settings

 

To Teens:

Love & Obey the Truth

Know the Truth

Teach the Truth

Teach Others to Teach the Truth

 

 

Resources

Worldview: Understand the Times Workbook by Meredith Curtis

 

Books

Understanding the Times by David Noebel

How Then Shall We Live by Frances Schaeffer

More Than a Carpenter by Josh McDowell

 

DVDs

“How Then Shall We Live?” (Frances Schaeffer & Frankie Schaeffer)

“Demolishing Strongholds”

 

Ministries

Summit Ministries https://www.summit.org/

 

Resources

Worldview: Understand the Times Workbook by Meredith Curtis

https://powerlineprod.weebly.com/worldview.html

 

Books

Understanding the Times by David Noebel

How Then Shall We Live by Frances Schaeffer

More Than a Carpenter by Josh McDowell

 

DVDs

“How Then Shall We Live?” (Frances Schaeffer & Frankie Schaeffer)

“Demolishing Strongholds” (Answers in Genesis)

 

Ministries

Summit Ministries https://www.summit.org/

 

Curriculum From a Christian Worldview

High School Curriculum by Powerline Productions20th Century History Book by Powerline Productions, Inc.Teach History the Fun Way with books by Powerline Productions, Inc., Finish Well Radio, Podcast #049

When Worldviews Collide

What is Your Worldview?

Finish Well Radio, Podcast #070, What is Your Worldview?In “What is Your Worldview,” Episode #070, Meredith Curtis explains what worldview is and the basic worldviews we encounter in the world around us: Christian, Muslim, Secular Humanist, Marxist Communism, Cosmic Humanist, and Post-Modern. Once we understand where people who hold different worldviews are coming from, we can compare those worldviews to the Bible because God’s Word speaks to every area of life.. In a mixed-up culture, Meredith challenges you to  think like a Christian and take a stand for the Truth.

 

 

 


Colossians 1:28 by Laura Nolette and Powerline Productions, Inc.Powerline Productions, Inc.

Being World Changers, Raising World Changers!

We offer books and ebooks to help you homeschool to the Glory of God!

 

 

 


Show Notes

Daddy’s Yellow Sunglasses

 

Biblical Worldview

Based on the Bible and Faith In Jesus Christs

 

Theology

God Is, Personal, Love, Holiness, Trinity, Faith, Supernatural,

Ethics

Moral Absolutes,  Lex Rex

History

Linear, Creation, Fall, Redemption, Return, New Heaven & New Earth

Center of History is Jesus. All History Points Forward to Him or Back to Him.

Science & Nature

Creation, Kinds, Creator has Ownership Rights over Creation

Philosophy

Faith & Reason

Psychology

Mind/Body, Image of God, Original Sin

Sociology

Authority Delegated to Family, Church, Government, Traditional Family

Economics

Stewardship, Private Property

Law

Divine Law & Natural Law, Lex Rex

Government

Justice, Freedom, Order

 

Secular Humanism

Man is the Measure of All Things

Naturalism, Material World is All There Is

One World Government Trumps National Sovereignty

Tower of Babel “Look What We Can Do!”

 

Theology

Atheist

Ethics

Moral Relativism

History

Historical Evolution

Science & Nature

Evolution, Naturalism, Material World is All There Is

Philosophy

Naturalism

Psychology

Self-Actualization

Sociology

Non-Traditional Family

State

Economics

Socialism, Redistribute the Wealth

Law

Law is Evolving

Government

Socialist One-World Government

 

Marxist Communism

Redistribute the Wealth

History is the Struggle Between the Haves and Have Nots

Proletariat must Rise Up Against the Bourgeoisie

Common Good More Important than Individual

 

Theology

Atheist

History

History is Struggle between Haves & Have Nots

Science & Nature

Punctuated Evolution

Philosophy

Dialectical Materialism

Psychology

Behaviorism

Sociology

Classless Society,  Remove Family & Church

Economics

Socialism, Redistribute the Wealth

Law

Law is Evolving

Government

State Runs Peoples’ Lives, Communist World Government

 

Cosmic Humanist

New World Order

Hollywood (Beverly Hills Show illustrated how Far Eastern Religions Moving In)

All Roads Lead to God

God is Impersonal, Spiritual Force

Meditation, Trances, Hypnosis, Eastern Religion

 

Theology

Pantheism

Ethics

Moral Relativism, Karma

History

Evolutionary, Moving Toward godhead

Science & Nature

Cosmic Evolution

Philosophy

Non-Naturalism

Psychology

Higher Consciousness

Sociology

Non-Traditional Family

State

Economics

Socialism, Distribute the Wealth

Law

Self-Law “If it feels good…”

Government

Self-Government, New World Order

 

Muslim

“Allah is god, Mohammed is his prophet”

God is Creator, Judge

Man not Fallen, no Original Sin

Works Oriented

Polygamy

Jihad

 

Theology

Theistic, No Trinity

Ethics

Moral Absolutes

History

Determinism (Fatalistic), Jihad

Science & Nature

Creationism

Philosophy

Faith & Reason

Psychology

Mind/Body, No Original SIn

Sociology

Mosque, Islamic State, Polygamy, Disrespect of Women

Economics

Stewardship of Property

Law

Shariah Law

Government

Islamic Theocracy (Global Islam)

 

Post-Modernism

Question Everything

No Ultimate Truth

Cultural Relativism

Follow Your Heart

What’s Good for You

What’s Right for You

Question Authority

 

Theology

Atheism

Ethics

Cultural Relativism

History

Multiple Perspectives on History, Not Interested in What Really Happened

Science & Nature

Punctuated Evolution

Philosophy

Anti-Realism

Psychology

Socially-Constructed Selves

Sociology

Sexual Egalitarianism

Economics

Interventionism

Law

Critical Legal Studies, Evolving

Government

Resist Realism Concepts of Power

 

Okay, so what is your worldview?

Does it line up with the Word of God?

Or have you been buying in to the devil’s lies?

 

Resources

Worldview: Understand the Times Workbook by Meredith Curtis

https://powerlineprod.weebly.com/worldview.html

 

Books

Understanding the Times by David Noebel

How Then Shall We Live by Frances Schaeffer

More Than a Carpenter by Josh McDowell

 

DVDs

“How Then Shall We Live?” (Frances Schaeffer & Frankie Schaeffer)

“Demolishing Strongholds” (Answers in Genesis)

 

Ministries

Summit Ministries https://www.summit.org/

 

Curriculum From a Christian Worldview

High School Curriculum by Powerline Productions20th Century History Books by Powerline Productions, Inc.Teach History the Fun Way with books by Powerline Productions, Inc., Finish Well Radio, Podcast #049

What is Your Worldview?

What to Include in your Middle and High School Language Arts Study

LCP Ep 5: What to Include in your Middle and High School Language Arts Study

Join Katie with Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about what to include in your Language Arts study in your homeschool. #homeschool #homeschooling #languagearts #english #middleschool #highschool

What do you need to include during the middle school years in Language Arts to make sure your learner is ready to tackle high school work? What kind of Language Arts and English program would colleges be looking for and what can count as credit for the high school transcript?

Visit Katie’s website for more fun ideas and tips to use in your homeschool at Katie’s Homeschool Cottage  or her Facebook Group.

Join Katie Glennon as she discusses what skills and concepts you should include in your Language Arts study during the middle and high school years. Katie shares an outline with some specific areas to make sure you include them in your Language Arts study during these critical years. She will suggest and discuss curriculum resources she found useful in her homeschool when her sons were in middle and high school that work efficiently and effectively to meet English requirements and make sure your learner is prepared for the next step – moving from middle into high school or high school into college.

The Areas of Language Arts you should include in the Middle and High School Years

What-to-Include-in-your-Middle and High School Homeschool-Language-Arts-Study pdf (Printable for you to download)

Show Notes

The Areas of Language Arts you should include in the Middle and High School Years
Reading/Literature

For literature during these years, I recommend a mix of short stories, poetry, essays (non-fiction), drama, and novels. These can be found either separately or in the form of a literary anthology and additional novels to read alongside the anthology.

Along with the novels, you will want to use some kind of novel study guides (that will also assist you with suggested vocabulary words and various questions).

Suggested Homeschool Literary Resources to Assist you in your Literature Study –

Total Language Plus (novel study guide)
Progeny Press (novel study guide)
Mosdos Press Literature Anthologies

Skills and Concepts for Literature Study

There are a number of skills and concepts you will want to include in your literary study.

These skills include –

• Vocabulary – I recommend using words from your reading for your vocabulary words because it saves you time and money from using a separate vocabulary program or curriculum. Most of all, in my experience it is more effective. The words are in context of what your learner is reading and will be understood and remembered more effectively because it is part of a story they will remember. It also gives your learner the practice in figuring out what words mean using their context within a sentence.

• Comprehension and Higher Order Thinking Skill Practice

Recalling details
Comprehending and understanding what they read (being able to identify the “main idea” or “theme” of the story)
Application skills – using what they have learned from the reading to problem solve
Analysis – drawing conclusions, comparing this written work to another from the same author or another author, or comparing what they have read to a personal experience.
Evaluation – critiquing the writing, selecting an issue from the writing and debating it.
Synthesis – taking a point, idea, theme, character from your reading and creating something new from that piece.
Elements of a story – plot, conflict, setting, characters, point of view, mood, tone
Literary devices and writing techniques such as similes, metaphors, imagery, personification, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, alliteration.

• Study different Genres – forms of writing and rhetoric – speeches, drama, essays, short stories, poetry, non-fiction, and novels.

• Study different literary time periods and areas around the world.

American Literature – Native American, Pre-colonial/Puritanism, Colonial, Revolutionary (age of Enlightenment/Reason), Romanticism (includes American Gothic, Transcendentalism), Realism/Naturalism/Regionalism, Modernism, Contemporary

British – (some crossover from American) Old English/Anglo-Saxon, Middle English/Medieval, Renaissance, Puritanism, Enlightenment, Romantic (Regency), Victorian, Modern

World Literature – (Western, Eastern, Other) Can focus primarily on Ancient works from Greek Philosophers or Christian authors, or a broad cross-section of countries, authors, and time periods from around the world.

Semester Specialty Classes – Poetry, Shakespeare, Drama, Journalism, Creative Writing, Research and Composition, specific types of literature or specific authors or parts of the world.

• Worldview – Christian Worldview expressed by author and content or Secular/Humanist view.

• Author Biography and Time Period in which he/she lived or wrote about.
Literature can be a reflection of cultural, religious, societal, and historical views, beliefs, and events written from the author’s point of view or the content itself.

Literature can also be an influencer of cultural, religious, and societal beliefs from the time period and society in which it is written or the author’s point of view and intent. It can influence thinking and historical events.

Writing and Composition

I recommend using your literature study as the jumping off point for essay writing and composition. However, before you can begin with that practice, your middle schooler and early high school student has to have some basic foundation in writing skills.

Middle schoolers should master the proper format of a paragraph –

A Hook to capture the reader’s interest and a Topic Sentence
At least 3 detailed supporting sentences that gives more information directly related to the topic sentence.
A concluding sentence that brings that paragraph to a close.

By the time learners start their first year in high school, they should be working on mastering the proper 5 Paragraph Essay (in this case an informative essay).

I recommend having your learner pick a topic they could talk to you about off the top of his/her head for 15 minutes without really having to think much about it. This topic lends itself to writing this kind of essay and the learner can concentrate on the format of the paper instead of what to write.

Proper 5 Paragraph (Informative) Essay
A Hook and topic (thesis) sentence with an introductory paragraph that include mentioned the three subtopics (or details about the main topic) that you will be discussing in the paper.
3 Body – detailed, supporting paragraphs in the order in which they were mentioned in the introductory paragraph. – Include transition words and sentence variation.
Concluding paragraph which includes a rewording of the topic sentence with a mention of the 3 subtopics and a Clincher sentence (could be a big statement, last thought, question, or a call to action).

Then you are ready to use your literary pieces as a basis of other essays –
Persuasive essay
Analytical essay
Research (and/or MLA, APA, Chicago format) essay
Persuasive essay with citations
Compare and Contrast essay itself to college application essays)
Literary Criticism

 

Here is a bundle of notebooking pages that we used for our written narration that I mentioned in the podcast to develop our writing skills before we wrote formal essays of different forms. There is a set for different subject areas that we used to either make our own books or put into a 3 ring binder to put together a notebook of our writing and what we learned in that subject that year.

Make Your Own ABC Book Notebooking Pages Bundle Set

Grammar

Use your learner’s writing to assess what skills they need to review and practice each week.

Other review and practice for grammar skills can be found with these resources –

Rod and Staff – (books go up to 8th grade, but the concepts and skills are up through high school work.) These books use diagramming and are very well explained. If you have a learner that loves following and making lists of steps and learns best this way, you might want to try diagramming. However, if it is frustrating or challenging for you or your learner to understand the “diagramming process”, it may not be worth using that method to learn the grammatical concepts.

If you have a hands-on learner, you may want to check out Winston Grammar. This program uses a hands-on approach and labels parts of speech and how the words are used in a sentence.

Another program I recommend is the Easy Grammar series. The Easy Grammar books have the text and instruction to learn and practice new skills and the Daily Grams are workbooks that have a daily review with 5 different kinds of grammar concepts with one sample of each per day for a total of 5 quick review samples to practice. Loved this! As your child moves into high school, you may want to use the Ultimate Series that has the text and instruction and the practice in each. There are placement tests on the website to assist you.

Spelling

Spelling for middle school can still be in a phonics based spelling book as recommended in my Language Arts for Elementary Ages podcast such as Building Spelling Skills by Christian Liberty Press .

You can also look at your learner’s writing and include words they misspell in your weekly spelling list.

If you have a learner who is ready to tackle more complex words, I recommend Spelling Power, an inclusive book that you will be able to use for years through high school and multiple learners. It supplies word lists and ways to study and learn the words each week.

Be sure to comment in the Comments box any ideas you’d like to share that your family has used in your Language Arts or any of these ideas from this podcast you found helpful! I would love to hear from you! Thanks for visiting! Come back and visit the Literary Cafe Podcast for August’s topic when we discuss how to study grammar in your homeschool!

Make sure you subscribe to the Literary Cafe Podcast at iTunes so you don’t miss an episode or by clicking on the Android or RSS feed buttons below the recording on this page!

Join Katie with Literary Cafe Podcast to learn about what to include in your Language Arts study in your homeschool. #homeschool #homeschooling #languagearts #english #middleschool #highschool

 

 

The Kitchen Explosion

Finish Well Radio Show, Podcast #069, The Kitchen ExplosionIn “The Kitchen Explosion,” Episode #069, you will get an inside look at a bustling high-energy homeschooling family. Sometimes in an attempt to make history come alive, I, Meredith Curtis have gone too far. How about you? Have you stepped out with enthusiasm only to have to call the fire department? Should we play it safe or step out with courage to live the adventure? I think learning should be fun and exciting! There is so much to learn everywhere, every day. Even if sometimes, there is an explosion in the kitchen.

 

 

 


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Show Notes

Studying 100 Years War. Wanted to Make it Come Alive.  Gunpowder. Smoky fields.

Making Smoke Bombs. Didn’t realize how dangerous. Pretty pink flame and KABOOM!

Just to make it clear: I believe in safety.

 

The Quest for Adventure

Instilled in us by the Lord who is the God of the Adventure Story.

The Flood, The Tower, Elijah and the Prophets of Baal, Fiery Furnace, Daniel in the Lion’s Den, Lazarus, The Resurrection.

 

Try Something New

Fly an Airplane

Pick Up an Instrument

Write a song….or a poem….or a novel

Pets (Cat Show, Skipper)

 

Do It a Different Way

Painting a Map on the Bathroom Wall

Make a Website

Interview Someone Who Was There

Make a Radio Show

 

Get Your Hands Dirty

Dissections. Yuck!

My labs in college.

Panning for Gold.

Gardening

 

Travel

Learning Never Takes a Vacation.

Sand Crab Hunting

Sea World Passes

Teddy Roosevelt’s House Sagamore Hill, NY

Let’s Stop in Puerto Rice on the Way to Pittsburgh

 

Parties

Medieval Banquet

Luau

Victorian Teas

Olympic Games

Passover Feast

Sock Hop

Literary Party

The Kitchen Explosion

Doubling Down on Seventeen – MBFLP 206

We hear from a lot of parents who are struggling with their eleven-year-olds – the preteen uproar is real! But a close second is parents who are wrestling with an older teen – typically a seventeen-year-old. They don’t feel the respect or obedience, they are experiencing pushback and defiance, and they wonder how to make this kid toe the line again. This episode, we look at that question and how we’d answer it – first hint, there’s an underlying problem that you can do something about, without having to change your child or get their buy-in! (keep reading)


What’s the problem?

Society has moved the goalposts. In 1920, it was expected that a 15- or 16-year-old was grown-up enough to find a job or start a family. Now, according to Georgetown University, 65% of jobs in available in the year 2020 will require at least some college education to qualify – that’s two-thirds of all jobs, just two years from now.

That’s telling young people “You’re not old enough to be an adult until you’re in your mid-twenties.” No wonder psychologists Joseph and Claudia Allen say, in Escaping the Endless Adolescence, “Twenty-five is the new fifteen.”

At the same time, the onset of puberty comes four- to five years sooner than it did in 1920. Our teenagers are gaining adult bodies, adult temptations, adult desires, long before they have adult opportunities – whether or not they’re emotionally mature by that time. They are feeling like grown-ups earlier than ever before, even if they can’t live that way.

And studies tell us that frequently, the parent-child relationship is strained or broken in the preteen years – and a rocky time as teenagers often started with the tween years. By the time they’re 17 or 18, they may have long-standing habits of bad interaction – and often, we parents do, too.

So what can be done?

Recognize the transition to adulthood doesn’t happen on the eve of their 18th birthday. We need to be training our teenagers in mature thinking and behavior from their early preteen years. That means we need to …

Recognize their growing adulthood. – They are feeling more and more grown up, and in many ways, they are. We found it helpful to start thinking and speaking of them as young adults, and expecting them to act that way.

Transition parenting from “director” to “advisor.” – Your younger children need your active direction – they need you to be a benevolent dictator! But your teens and young adults need you as an advisor. They need to learn to ask their own questions and do their own research, then make decisions for themselves – not wait for orders nor wrench themselves free of your influence. You want to become a trusted counselor to them, not to order them around but to offer your wisdom and experience as guidance.

Learn to listen. – Often our kids feel like we never listen to them. We are so focused on the parent-child aspect we fail to appreciate them as people. One way to improve that is to always engage a bid for attention: Whenever they speak or whenever they want to show you something, make a point to look up and make eye contact, then engage whatever is on their mind.

Dr Jeff Myers of Summit Ministries says that we must teach truth, but it is only received in the context of a relationship – a relationship of love, trust, and respect.

Psalm 116:1-2 says,
I love the LORD, because He has heard
My voice and my supplications.
Because He has inclined His ear to me,
Therefore I will call upon Him as long as I live

We want that kind of relationship with our adult kids – we want them to love us and we want them to call us when we’re apart. And what does this passage say? “I love the LORD because He has heard and inclined His ear to me.”

If you want your kids to listen to you, then you need to listen to them.
If you want them to pay attention to you, you need to pay attention to them.
If you want them to love and respect you, then you need to love and respect them – in a way that they appreciate!

If you have a 16- or 17-year-old and you find yourself struggling, why not give this a try? Simply recalibrate your own thinking to see them as a young adult—who still needs coaching and guidance, sure! – but a young adult who is truly a complete person with his own needs and concerns and dreams and fears – not just “your kid” who needs correction.

Try reaching out to them as though they were a young adult not in your family.

Treat them with courtesy and not just command.

And see if they don’t respond!


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ENOUGH! We Are Free!

Finish Well Radio, Podcast #068, Enough! We are Free!In “ENOUGH! We are Free!,” Episode #068, Meredith Curtis explains how one event led to another, resulting in our Founding Fathers declaring our Independence. If you are hazy on the details of events leading to the day we celebrate, July 4, 1776, where Ben Franklin declared, “Well, we either all hang together or we’ll all hang separately” and John Hancock signed his lavish signature big and bold, saying, “There now the king can read it without his spectacles!” join us. Meredith shows how the Great Awakening, the French and Indian War, the Proclamation Line of 1763, the Boston Massacre, the seizure of the Liberty, the Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere’s Ride, Patrick Henry’s Speech, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and more led to our Founding Fathers deciding, “Enough! We are declaring ourselves to be a free and independent nation with God’s help.” Take a whirlwind tour of several decades culminating in the signing of our precious Declaration of Independence.

 

 


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Show Notes

Our history is British. The 13 American colonies who became the United States of America were all British colonies.

English Common Law

Rights that Englishmen enjoyed:

  • representative government
  • trial by a jury of peers
  • accused faces accusers
  • protection of private property
  • everyone from King to peasant accountable to God and the law of the land

Colonial Autonomy

Colonists from the beginning enjoyed a large amount of freedom and self-government.

  • The Pilgrims signed the Mayflower Compact
  • the Massachusetts Bay Company stockholders who made decisions for the colony all lived in Boston
  • New England enjoyed town hall meetings
  • Virginians elected representatives who enjoyed autonomy

Great Awakening

Revival brought unity that crossed denominational lines that often separate people. Revival erased the division of colony boundaries.

French & Indian War

Trained the colonists for war, taught them to work together against a common enemy.

Big problem: The British soldiers would not go home.

Proclamation Line of 1763

To keep their word to the Native Americans who fought on the side of the British, Parliament passed a law protecting land west of the Proclamation Line of 1763 for the Native Americans.

Taxes

Parliament taxed the American colonists here, there, and everywhere. Most of it was to pay off the debt from the French and Indian War, but some was just because they could.

Representatives from several colonies also met together and sent a protest letter to the king. In 1766, Founding Father Ben Franklin traveled to London, appearing before Parliament, asking them to repeal the Stamp Act.

Repeal the Stamp Act they did. However, the passed the Declaratory Act right away saying, “we can pass any law we want to in the colonies!” It was like a slap in the face. British citizens were supposed to have representation. The cry began, “No taxation without representation!”

The New York Assembly voted to ignore the Quartering Act on December 15, 1766. They refused to fund the British soldiers. Outraged, King George III, disbanded the New York Assembly. Things were heating up!

Mercantilism

Mercantilism, or using protectionism to restrict trade in the colonies in order to fill the Mother country’s treasury, was practiced by Great Britain. They outlawed free trade, dictated who the colonists could buy from, levied high tariffs, and taxed whatever they could. The colonists believed in Free-Market economics and freedom of choice, so mercantilism frustrated them.

Boston Massacre 1770

Some British colonists forgot a very important truth: it’s not wise to through rocks at someone holding a gun who has the legal right to use it. This incident, however, inflamed anger throughout all 13 colonies.

Committees of Correspondence 1772

An unfortunate event led to colonists being taken back to England to stand trial. This violated their rights as Englishmen to a jury of their peers. Committees of Correspondence were started to protect towns from invasive government trampling on individual rights.

Sons of Liberty

The Sons of Liberty was founded in Boston in 1765 to fight the Stamp Act. It grew into all 13 colonies to fight for protection of the colonists rights as Englishmen. Sons of Liberty included Samuel Adams, Benedict Arnold, John Hancock, Patrick Henry, James Otis, Jr., Paul Revere, James Swan, Alexander McDougall, Benjamin Rush, Charles Thompson, Joseph Warren, Marinus Willet, Oliver Wolcott, Christopher Gadsden, Haym Salomon, Hercules Mulligan, Thomas Melville, and Isaac Sears.

Who was John Hancock?

John Hancock was a wealthy merchant in Boston. His ship Liberty was seized in 1768. He was a Son of Liberty. He served as President of the Second Continental Congress and first and third governor of Massachusetts.

Who was Samuel Adams?

Sam Adams was a politician in Boston who worked tirelessly for freedom as a Son of Liberty. He was a member of the Continental Congresses and served as fourth governor of Massachusetts.

Boston Tea Party 1773

John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and other Sons of Liberty dressed up as Native Americans, stormed a British ship and tossed all the cargo (tea) into the Boston Harbor, created one large pot of tea.

Closing Boston Port March 1774

As punishment for the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Harbor was closed to all but British military ships. As you can imagine, businesses were sunk! This affected almost every family in Boston in a negative way.

First Continental Congress September 1774

“We’ve had enough!” colonial leaders decided and met together to appeal to King George III and Parliament. They did three things:

  1. A Declaration of Rights (Freedom of trial by jury of peers, freedom of assembly, and freedom to representative if they were taxed)
  2. Organized a Boycott of British Goods
  3. Declared that if Patriots were attacked, they would defend themselves

Compromise Feb 1775

In January of 1775, Parliament considered the appeal from the First Continental Congress, eventually deciding to ease up on some of the taxes and give in on other issues by February.

Patrick Henry Speech March 1775

Meanwhile down in Virginia, the House of Burgesses had been disbanded by the Royal Governor, so they met in secret at a church. They were discussing the need to raise a volunteer calvary and infantry in every Virginia county when Patrick Henry gave his famous “Give Me Liberty or Give me Death” speech. The delegates sat in contemplative silence after the speech and the resolution passed.

Looking for Sam & John April 1775

General Gage was ordered to use whatever force is necessary to enforce the laws on April 14 and to confiscate militia weapons. He was to disarm the rebels and arrest key leaders like Sam Adams and John Hancock.

Paul Revere’s Ride

Sons of Liberty intercepted the British plans to capture Sam and John, as well as the colonists stockpile of weapons. Paul Revere and John Dawes were sent on different routes to warn, “The British are coming!” Sam and John escaped and the weapons were moved to a new location. However, …

Battle of Lexington

In Lexington, Captain John Parker gathered the Militia and Minutemen to prepare for battle. The British arrived at sunrise the next day. A few shots were exchanged between the Militia and the British troops, driving the Americans away. Eight Americans were dead and ten wounded. Only one British soldier was injured. On to Concord.

Battle of Concord

As the British entered Concord, the Americans fell back, taking up position on a hill across North Bridge. The British roamed through Concord looking for guns and military supplies. They destroyed three canons and some gunpowder.

In the meantime, reinforcements arrived, so the Americans advanced toward the British. American Colonel James Barrett led his men to engage the British and send them fleeing. They regrouped and headed back to Boston.

As the British headed back to Boston through Lexington, the Militia engaged them along the way. It was a bloody march back to Boston for the British.

Second Continental Congress

On May 10, 1775, representatives from all 13 colonies arrived in Philadelphia for the Second Continental Congress. They moved step-by-step toward independence, writing and signing the Declaration of Independence in 1776. They managed the military effort in the Revolutionary War and wrote the Articles of Confederation.

Declaration of Independence

On July 2, Richard Henry Lee, a representative from Virginia, urged the Continental Convention to declare themselves free from Great Britain. On July 4, 1776, the colonists signed the Declaration of Independence, doing just what Richard Henry Lee urged. This was a firm declaration that the colonies were now a free country.

Our own Declaration of Independence

Galatians 5:1

It is for freedom we have been set free. This fourth of July, it’s time to sign your own Declaration of Independence.

Resources

American History TimelineAmerican History CookbookFamilies Learning Together: American History Art AppreciationAmerican Literature & Research


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